Names Categorized "top 10 in Kazakhstan"

This is a list of names in which the categories include top 10 in Kazakhstan.
gender
usage
Aleksandr m Russian, Armenian, Ukrainian
Russian and Armenian form of Alexander. This name was borne by the 19th-century Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin.
Alexander m English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
Alikhan m Kazakh
Combination of the name Ali 1 and the Turkic title khan, which means "ruler, leader".
Alina f Romanian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovene, German, Italian, Spanish
Short form of Adelina, Albina and names that end in alina.
Amina f Arabic, Bosnian, Tatar, Kazakh, Eastern African, Western African, Swahili, Hausa
Alternate transcription of Arabic Aminah 1 or Aminah 2, as well as the form in several other languages.
Amir 1 m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay, Indonesian, Bosnian
Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.
Andrey m Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Bulgarian and Belarusian form of Andrew.
Arsen m Armenian
Armenian form of Arsenios.
Artyom m Russian
Russian form of Artemios.
Aruzhan f Kazakh
Means "beautiful soul" in Kazakh.
Ayaulym f Kazakh
Means "beloved" in Kazakh.
Aygerim f Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kazakh Әйгерім (see Aigerim).
Azamat m Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Uzbek, Bashkir
Derived from Arabic عظمة ('azamah) meaning "majesty, glory".
Ekaterina f Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Katherine, and an alternate transcription of Russian Екатерина (see Yekaterina).
Elena f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Estonian, Finnish, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Form of Helen used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see Yelena).
Galina f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian feminine form of Galenos (see Galen).
Inkar f Kazakh
Means "desire, passion" in Kazakh.
Inzhu f Kazakh
Means "pearl" in Kazakh.
Irina f Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Georgian, Finnish, Estonian
Form of Irene in several languages.
Madina f Kazakh, Avar, Chechen
From the name of the city of Medina, Arabic المدينة (al-Madinah), which means "the city". The Saudi city is considered an Islamic holy site because the Prophet Muhammad was based there for a period.
Marina f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Marinus. This name was borne by a few early saints. This is also the name by which Saint Margaret of Antioch is known in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Nadezhda f Russian, Bulgarian
Means "hope" in Russian and Bulgarian.
Natalya f Russian
Russian form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Nurasyl m Kazakh (Rare)
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) and асыл (asyl) meaning "precious, noble".
Nurislam m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) combined with Islam, the name of the religion (ultimately from Arabic إسلام).
Olga f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of the Old Norse name Helga. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, the ruler of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Like her husband she was probably a Varangian, who were Norse people who settled in eastern Europe beginning in the 9th century. Following Igor's death she ruled as regent for her son Svyatoslav for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity, though this goal was only achieved by her grandson Vladimir.
Ruslan m Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Turkmen, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar, Circassian, Indonesian, Malay
Form of Yeruslan used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem Ruslan and Ludmila (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.
Sergey m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Sergius.
Sezim f Kazakh
Means "sensitive" in Kazakh.
Svetlana f Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Armenian, Georgian
Derived from Russian svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
Talgat m Kazakh
Kazakh form of Tal'at.
Tatyana f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Tatiana.
Vladimir m Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of a 9th-century ruler of Bulgaria. It was also borne by an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev, Vladimir the Great, who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm. Other notable bearers include the revolutionary and first leader of the Soviet state Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924), and the Russian president and prime minister Vladimir Putin (1952-).