Names Categorized "people"

This is a list of names in which the categories include people.
gender
usage
Amadi 1 m Western African, Igbo
Means "freeborn man" in Igbo.
Amadioha m Igbo Mythology
Derived from Igbo àmádí "freeborn man" and ọ̀hà "community, people". The is the name of the god of thunder and lightning in traditional Igbo belief.
Ami 4 m Hebrew
Means "my people" or "my nation" in Hebrew.
Archelaus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical Latin, Biblical
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀρχέλαος (Archelaos), which meant "master of the people" from ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". This was the name of a son of Herod the Great. He ruled over Judea, Samaria and Idumea.
Aristodemos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek elements ἄριστος (aristos) meaning "best" and δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people". This was the name of a descendant of Herakles in Greek legend.
Ashkii m Indigenous American, Navajo
Means "boy" in Navajo.
Babatunde m Western African, Yoruba
Means "father has come again" in Yoruba.
Beornræd m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and ræd "counsel, advice".
Cambria f Various
Latin form of the Welsh Cymru, the Welsh name for the country of Wales, derived from cymry meaning "the people". It is occasionally used as a given name in modern times.
Charilaos m Ancient Greek, Greek
Means "grace of the people", derived from Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness" and λαός (laos) meaning "people".
Damocles m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δαμοκλῆς (Damokles), which was derived from δᾶμος (damos) meaning "the people", a Doric Greek variant of δῆμος (demos), and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". In Greek legend Damocles was a member of the court of Dionysius the Elder, the king of Syracuse. Damocles expressed envy of the king's station so Dionysius offered to switch roles with him for a day. To illustrate to Damocles the peril of a man in his position he suspended a sword over the throne.
Dedrick m African American
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Diederik.
Democritus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Δημόκριτος (Demokritos), a Greek name meaning "judge of the people" from the elements δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people" and κριτής (krites) meaning "judge, critic". This was the name of a Greek philosopher, the creator of the atomic theory.
Demon m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people".
Demophon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people" and φωνή (phone) meaning "voice". In Greek mythology this was the name of the son of Theseus and Phaedra.
Demosthenes m Ancient Greek
Means "vigour of the people" from Greek δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people" and σθένος (sthenos) meaning "vigour, strength". This was the name of both an Athenian general of the 5th century and an Athenian orator of the 4th century.
Demostrate f Ancient Greek
Means "army of the people", derived from the Greek elements δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people" and στρατός (stratos) meaning "army".
Derek m English
From the older English name Dederick, which was in origin a Low German form of Theodoric. It was imported to England from the Low Countries in the 15th century.
Detlef m Low German, German
Derived from Old High German diota, Old Saxon thiod meaning "people" and Old High German leiba, Old Saxon leva meaning "remainder, remnant, legacy".
Diederich m German (Archaic)
German variant of Dietrich.
Diederik m Dutch
Dutch form of Theodoric.
Diedrich m German
German form of Theodoric.
Dieter m German
Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Old German elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and heri meaning "army". This name is also used as a short form of Dietrich.
Dietfried m German (Rare)
Means "peace of the people" from the Old German elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and fridu meaning "peace".
Diethard m German
German form of Theodard.
Diethelm m German
Derived from the Old German elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and helm meaning "helmet, protection".
Dietlinde f German
From the Germanic name Theodelinda, derived from the elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and lind meaning "soft, flexible, tender". Theodelinda was a 6th-century Bavarian princess who became queen of the Lombards.
Dietmar m German
German form of Theudemer.
Dietrich m German
German form of Theodoric. The character Dietrich von Bern, loosely based on Theodoric the Great, appears in medieval German literature such as the Hildebrandslied, the Nibelungenlied and the Eckenlied.
Dieuwe m Frisian
Frisian short form of Dieuwer or Dieuwert.
Dieuwer m Frisian
Frisian form of the Old German name Dietwar, a later form of Theodoar.
Dieuwke f Frisian, Dutch
Feminine form of Dieuwer or Dieuwert.
Dimosthenis m Greek
Modern Greek transcription of Demosthenes.
Elmira 2 f Tatar, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Azerbaijani
Possibly from Turkic el meaning "country, society" combined with Arabic أمير (amir) meaning "commander".
Elnur m Azerbaijani
Means "light of the people" in Azerbaijani, ultimately derived from Turkic el meaning "country, society" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Eniola f & m Western African, Yoruba
Means "person of wealth" in Yoruba.
Folcmar m Germanic
Old German form of Volkmar.
Fólki m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Folke.
Friduman m Germanic
Old German form of Friedemann.
Friedemann m German
Means "man of peace" from the Old German elements fridu "peace" and man "person, man".
Fulbert m French, Germanic
From the Old German elements folk "people" and beraht "bright". Saint Fulbert was an 11th-century bishop of Chartres.
Fulchard m Germanic
Old German form of Volkhard.
Fulco m Germanic
Old German form of Fulk.
Fulk m English (Archaic)
From the Germanic name Fulco, a short form of various names beginning with the Old Frankish element fulk, Old High German folk meaning "people" (Proto-Germanic *fulką). The Normans brought this name to England, though it is now very rare.
Gintautas m Lithuanian
From the Lithuanian root gin- "to defend" and tauta "people, nation".
Goronwy m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of Gronw. This form appears in the Book of Taliesin. It was borne by the Welsh poet Goronwy Owen (1723-1769).
Gronw m Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown, perhaps from Old Welsh gur "man". According to the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi he was the lover of Blodeuwedd. He attempted to murder her husband Lleu Llaw Gyffes with a special spear he crafted over the course of a year, but Lleu transformed into an eagle. After he was restored to human form he killed Gronw.
Gweneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenith f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth, influenced by the Welsh word gwenith meaning "wheat".
Gwenneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenyth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwynedd f & m Welsh
From the name of the kingdom of Gwynedd, which was located in northern Wales from the 5th century. It is now the name of a Welsh county. The name may be related to Old Irish Féni meaning "Irish people", itself possibly related to the Celtic root *wēnā meaning "band of warriors".
Gwyneth f Welsh, English
Probably a variant of Gwynedd. It has been common in Wales since the 19th century, perhaps after the Welsh novelist Gwyneth Vaughan (1852-1910), whose real name was Ann Harriet Hughes. A modern famous bearer is the American actress Gwyneth Paltrow (1972-).
Hirohito m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "abundant" and (hito) meaning "person" or (hito) meaning "compassionate". Hirohito (1901-1989), name written , was the emperor of Japan from 1926 to 1989. Different combinations of kanji can also form this name.
Illtyd m Welsh
From Old Welsh Eltut, derived from the intensive prefix el- combined with tut "people, country". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded the abbey of Llanilltud in Glamorgan.
Iyabo f Western African, Yoruba
Means "mother has returned" in Yoruba.
Katsuhito m Japanese
From Japanese (katsu) meaning "victory" or (katsu) meaning "overcome" combined with (hito) meaning "person" or (hito) meaning "compassionate". Other kanji characters can combine to form this name as well.
Laertes m Greek Mythology
Means "gatherer of the people" in Greek. This is the name of the father of Odysseus in Greek mythology. It was later utilized by Shakespeare for a character in his tragedy Hamlet (1600), in which he is the son of Polonius. His ultimate duel with Hamlet leads to both of their deaths.
Léopold m French
French form of Leopold.
Leopold m German, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Old German elements liut "people" and bald "bold, brave". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1922).
Léopoldine f French
French feminine form of Leopold.
Leopoldo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Leopold.
Leudbald m Germanic
Old German form of Leopold.
Leutgar m Germanic
Old German form of Ludger.
Leutgard f Germanic
Old German form of Luitgard.
Leuthar m Germanic
Old German name composed of the elements liut "people" and heri "army".
Leutwin m Germanic
Old German name derived from the elements liut "people" and wini "friend". Saint Leutwin (or Leudwinus) was an 8th-century bishop of Trier.
Liupold m Germanic
Old German form of Leopold.
Ljudevit m Croatian
Croatian cognate of Ľudovít.
Lubbert m Dutch
Dutch form of the Old German name Leutbert, derived from the elements liut "people" and beraht "bright". Liutbert (or Liutpert) was an 8th-century Lombard king.
Ludger m German
From the Old German name Leutgar, which was derived from the elements liut "people" and ger "spear". Saint Ludger was an 8th-century Frisian Benedictine bishop who founded a monastery at Munster.
Ludivine f French
Possibly from a feminine form of Leutwin. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the French miniseries Les Gens de Mogador.
Ludmila f Czech, Latvian, Russian
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.... [more]
Ludmilla f Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Людмила (see Lyudmila).
Ľudovít m Slovak
Means "master of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and vit "master, lord".
Luitgard f German
From the Old German name Leutgard, which was derived from the elements liut "people" and gart "enclosure, yard". It was borne by Charlemagne's fifth and last wife. This was also the name of a 13th-century Flemish nun, the patron saint of easy deliveries.
Luitpold m German (Archaic)
German variant of Leopold.
Lutgard f Flemish
Variant of Lutgarde.
Lutgarde f Flemish
Dutch (Flemish) form of Luitgard.
Lutgardis f Germanic (Latinized), Flemish
Latinized form of Leutgard (see Luitgard). In Flanders this form of the name is common on birth certificates, but it is usually rendered Lutgarde in daily life.
Luther m English
From a German surname, itself derived from the Old German given name Leuthar. The surname was borne by Martin Luther, a 16th-century monk and theologian, who started the Protestant Reformation by nailing his famous 95 theses to a church door. It has since been used as a given name in his honour, especially among Protestants. A notable bearer from the modern era was the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).
Lyudmila f Russian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Russian and Bulgarian form of Ludmila. This was the name of a character in Aleksandr Pushkin's poem Ruslan and Lyudmila (1820).
Menelaus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Μενέλαος (Menelaos), derived either from μένω (meno) meaning "to stay, to last" or μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force" combined with λαός (laos) meaning "people". In Greek legend he was a king of Sparta and the husband of Helen. When his wife was taken by Paris, the Greeks led by his brother Agamemnon besieged the city of Troy in an effort to get her back. After the war Menelaus and Helen settled down to a happy life.
Min 1 m & f Chinese, Korean
From (mǐn) meaning "quick, clever, sharp", (mín) meaning "people, citizens", or other Chinese/Sino-Korean characters that are pronounced similarly.
Min-Seo f Korean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "people, citizens" or (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" combined with (seo) meaning "slowly, calmly, composed, dignified" or (seo) meaning "series, sequence". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
Min-Su m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "people, citizens" or (min) meaning "gentle, affable" combined with (su) meaning "luxuriant, beautiful, elegant, outstanding" or (su), which refers to a river in China. Other hanja combinations are possible.
Nichola f English (British)
Chiefly British feminine form of Nicholas.
Nicholas m English
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.... [more]
Nicodemo m Italian, Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Nicodemus.
Nicodemus m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νικόδημος (Nikodemos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.
Nicola 2 f German, English
Feminine form of Nicholas. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
Nicolasa f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Nicholas.
Nicole f French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Nicholas, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
Nikodem m Polish
Polish form of Nicodemus.
Nikodim m Russian
Russian form of Nicodemus.
Okoro m Western African, Igbo
Means "boy, young man" in Igbo.
Siniša m Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Serbo-Croatian sin meaning "son".
Svatopluk m Czech
Means "blessed people", derived from the Slavic elements svetu "blessed, holy" and pulku "people, host, army". Svatopluk the Great was a 9th-century ruler of Great Moravia, a region centered around the modern Czech Republic and Slovakia.
Takuto m Japanese
From Japanese (taku) meaning "expand, open, support" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Teobaldo m Spanish, Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Theobald.
Teodomiro m Spanish
Spanish form of Theodemir.
Thelonius m Various
Latinized form of Tielo (see Till). A famous bearer was jazz musician Thelonious Monk (1917-1982).
Theobald m English (Rare), Germanic
Means "bold people", derived from the Old German elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and bald meaning "bold, brave". It was borne by a 6th-century Frankish king of Austrasia. The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
Theodard m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and hart meaning "hard, firm, brave, hardy". This name was borne by a 7th-century Frankish saint and martyr, a bishop of Maastricht.
Theodelinda f Germanic
Old German form of Dietlinde.
Theodemir m Gothic (Anglicized)
From the Gothic name *Þiudamers, derived from the elements þiuda "people" and mers "famous". This was the name of a 5th-century king of the Ostrogoths, the father of Theodoric the Great. It was also borne by a 6th-century king of the Suebi in Galicia. There was also a saint by this name, a 9th-century Benedictine monk who was martyed at Córdoba.
Theoderich m Germanic
Old German form of Theodoric.
Theodoar m Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and war meaning "aware, cautious".
Theodoard m Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Frankish þeoda) and wart meaning "guard, guardian".
Theodoric m Gothic (Anglicized)
From the Gothic name *Þiudareiks meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements þiuda "people" and reiks "ruler, king". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus.
Theothelm m Germanic
Old German form of Diethelm.
Theotleib m Germanic
Old German form of Detlef.
Theotman m Germanic
Old German form of Thijmen.
Theudebald m Germanic
Old German form of Theobald.
Theudelinda f Germanic
Variant of Theodelinda (see Dietlinde).
Theudemer m Germanic
Old German form of Theodemir. Theudemer (or Theodemer) was a 5th-century king of the Franks.
Theudhar m Germanic
Old German form of Dieter.
Theudofrid m Germanic
Old German form of Dietfried.
Thiemo m Germanic
Old German form of Timo 2.
Thijmen m Dutch
Dutch form of the Germanic name Theotman, derived from the elements theod meaning "people" (Old High German diota, Old Dutch thiad) and man meaning "person, man".
Tiedemann m German (Archaic)
German form of Theotman (see Thijmen).
Tielo m Medieval German
Earlier form of Till.
Tilo m German
Variant of Till.
Timo 2 m German, Dutch
From Thiemo, an old short form of Thietmar (see Dietmar).
Toal m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Túathal.
Túathal m Old Irish
Means "ruler of the people", from Old Irish túath "people, country" and fal "rule". This was the name of a few Irish kings, including the legendary Túathal Techtmar.
Tuathflaith f Old Irish
From Old Irish túath "people, country" and flaith "ruler, sovereign, princess".
Tudwal m Welsh (Rare)
From the Old Welsh and Breton name Tutgual, derived from tut "people, country" and gual "ruler, leader". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton saint.
Tutgual m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Tudwal.
Viltautas m Lithuanian (Rare)
From Lithuanian viltis "hope" and tauta "people, nation".
Volker m German
Derived from the Old German element folk "people" combined with heri "army".
Volkhard m German (Rare)
Derived from the Old German elements folk "people" and hart "hard, brave".
Volkmar m German
Derived from the Old German element folk "people" combined with mari "famous".
Vytautas m Lithuanian
From the Lithuanian root vyd- "to see" or vyti "to chase, to drive away" combined with tauta "people, nation". This was the name of a 15th-century Grand Duke of Lithuania, revered as a national hero in that country.
Vytautė f Lithuanian
Feminine form of Vytautas.
Witold m Polish
Polish form of Vytautas. Alternatively it could be derived from the Old German name Widald.