jodirae's Personal Name List

Amadeus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs(English) ahm-ə-DEE-əs(English)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 50% based on 126 votes
Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.
Amelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian) an-MEH-lya(Polish)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 67% based on 136 votes
Variant of Amalia, though it is sometimes confused with Emilia, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century — it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

Annelies
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: ah-nə-LEES
Rating: 54% based on 127 votes
Variant of Anneliese.
Aram 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Kurdish
Other Scripts: ئارام(Kurdish Sorani)
Rating: 34% based on 85 votes
Means "calm" in Kurdish.
Aspen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AS-pən
Rating: 42% based on 120 votes
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
Avery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 55% based on 115 votes
From an English surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names Alberich or Alfred.

As a given name, it was used on the American sitcom Murphy Brown (1988-1998) for both the mother and son of the main character. By 1998 it was more popular as a name for girls in the United States, perhaps further inspired by a character from the movie Jerry Maguire (1996).

Aviva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-VEE-vah
Rating: 41% based on 47 votes
Feminine variant of Aviv.
Bram
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: BRAM(English) BRAHM(Dutch)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 51% based on 108 votes
Short form of Abraham. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote Dracula.
Brynn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIN
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 41% based on 108 votes
Feminine variant of Bryn. It was brought to limited public attention in 1978 when the actress Brynn Thayer (1949-) began appearing on the American soap opera One Life to Live [1].
Cadell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Rare) [1]
Rating: 34% based on 32 votes
From Old Welsh Catell, derived from cat "battle" and a diminutive suffix. This was the name of two early kings of Powys in Wales.
Callahan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə-han
Rating: 47% based on 35 votes
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Ceallacháin, itself from the given name Cellachán.
Calloway
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
Means "pebble". From the Old French cail(ou) 'pebble'. Traditionally an English surname, which is a regional name of French Norman origin from Caillouet-Orgeville in Eure, France.
Callum
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-əm
Rating: 57% based on 105 votes
Variant of Calum.
Camilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: kə-MIL-ə(English) ka-MEEL-la(Italian) kah-MEEL-lah(Danish) KAH-meel-lah(Finnish) ka-MI-la(German)
Rating: 56% based on 45 votes
Feminine form of Camillus. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
Camille
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE(French) kə-MEEL(English)
Rating: 61% based on 37 votes
French feminine and masculine form of Camilla. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
Carmen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, French, Romanian, German
Pronounced: KAR-mehn(Spanish, Italian) KAHR-mən(English)
Rating: 57% based on 92 votes
Medieval Spanish form of Carmel influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
Cormac
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish
Rating: 51% based on 101 votes
From Old Irish Cormacc or Corbmac, of uncertain meaning, possibly from corb "chariot, wagon" or corbbad "defilement, corruption" combined with macc "son". This is the name of several characters from Irish legend, including the semi-legendary high king Cormac mac Airt who supposedly ruled in the 3rd century, during the adventures of the hero Fionn mac Cumhaill. This name was also borne by a few early saints.
Danica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даница(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DA-nee-tsa(Serbian, Croatian) DA-nyee-tsa(Slovak) DAN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 47% based on 106 votes
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
Declan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: DEHK-lən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 104 votes
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, Old Irish Declán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to the Déisi peoples of Ireland and the founder of the monastery at Ardmore.

In America, this name received boosts in popularity from main characters in the movies The Jackal (1997) and Leap Year (2010).

Dermot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 32% based on 33 votes
Anglicized form of Diarmaid.
Elam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֵילָם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-ləm(English)
Rating: 36% based on 67 votes
Possibly means either "hidden" or "eternity" in Hebrew. This is the name of several characters in the Old Testament, including a son of Shem who was the ancestor of the Elamite peoples.
Elise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: eh-LEE-zə(German) eh-LEE-seh(Norwegian, Danish, Swedish) i-LEES(English) EE-lees(English)
Rating: 65% based on 116 votes
Short form of Elizabeth.
Emerson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ər-sən
Rating: 43% based on 102 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Emery". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
Emery
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-ree
Rating: 38% based on 95 votes
Norman form of Emmerich. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, now typically feminine, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
Emmanuel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, French, English
Other Scripts: עִמָּנוּאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EH-MA-NWEHL(French) i-MAN-yoo-ehl(English)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 50% based on 100 votes
From the Hebrew name עִמָּנוּאֵל ('Immanu'el) meaning "God is with us", from the roots עִם ('im) meaning "with" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". This was the foretold name of the Messiah in the Old Testament. It has been used in England since the 16th century in the spellings Emmanuel and Immanuel, though it has not been widespread [1]. The name has been more common in continental Europe, especially in Spain and Portugal (in the spellings Manuel and Manoel).
Evander 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὔανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər(English) ə-VAN-dər(English)
Rating: 60% based on 39 votes
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὔανδρος (Euandros) meaning "good of man", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
Everett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Rating: 58% based on 100 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Everard.
Fern
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FURN
Rating: 57% based on 27 votes
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
Finley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIN-lee
Rating: 50% based on 100 votes
Variant of Finlay. This is by far the preferred spelling in the United States, where it has lately been more common as a feminine name.
Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1], Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 59% based on 103 votes
Old Irish form of Fionn, as well as the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Fiona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: fee-O-nə(English)
Rating: 64% based on 87 votes
Feminine form of Fionn. This name was (first?) used by the Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem Fingal (1761), in which it is spelled as Fióna.
Fiorenza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyo-REHN-tsa
Rating: 43% based on 71 votes
Italian feminine form of Florentius (see Florence).
Flynn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLIN
Rating: 56% based on 40 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn, which was derived from the given name or byname Flann. A famous bearer of the surname was American actor Errol Flynn (1909-1959). As a given name, it grew in popularity after it was featured as a character in the Disney movie Tangled in 2010.
Forest
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWR-ist
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 46% based on 72 votes
Variant of Forrest, or else directly from the English word forest.
Gabrielle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) gab-ree-EHL(English)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 50% based on 103 votes
French feminine form of Gabriel. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
Gallagher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GAL-ə-gər
Rating: 36% based on 33 votes
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Gallchobhair, derived from the given name Gallchobhar.
Gianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Γιάννα(Greek)
Pronounced: JAN-na(Italian) YA-na(Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 95 votes
Italian short form of Giovanna and a Modern Greek variant of Ioanna.
Giles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIELZ
Rating: 43% based on 80 votes
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αἰγίδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.
Hadley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAD-lee
Rating: 33% based on 97 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
Hosanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Pronounced: ho-ZAN-ə(English)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 30% based on 65 votes
From the Aramaic religious expression הושע נא (Hosha' na') meaning "deliver us" in Hebrew. In the New Testament this is exclaimed by those around Jesus when he first enters Jerusalem.
Hudson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUD-sən
Rating: 41% based on 66 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Hudde". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
Janae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 28% based on 98 votes
Elaborated form of Jane.
Jasper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Rating: 65% based on 103 votes
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the Biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
Joachim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Polish, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Pronounced: YO-a-khim(German) yo-A-khim(German) ZHAW-A-KEEM(French) yaw-A-kheem(Polish) JO-ə-kim(English)
Rating: 43% based on 63 votes
Contracted form of Jehoiachin or Jehoiakim. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
Joash
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאָשׁ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-ash(English)
Rating: 28% based on 84 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאָשׁ (Yo'ash), possibly meaning "fire of Yahweh". In the Old Testament this name was borne by several characters including the father of Gideon, a king of Judah, and a son of King Ahab of Israel.
JoBeth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JO-beth
Rating: 26% based on 30 votes
Combination of Jo and Beth.
Joelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-EHL
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 37% based on 97 votes
Feminine form of Joel.
Joetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 25% based on 27 votes
Elaborated form of Jo.
Josephine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: JO-sə-feen(English) yo-zeh-FEE-nə(German)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 68% based on 105 votes
English, German and Dutch form of Joséphine.
Josias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 40% based on 85 votes
Latinized form of Josiah used in some English versions of the Old Testament.
Junia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman
Rating: 52% based on 65 votes
Feminine form of Junius. This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament (there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman).
Juno
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: YOO-no(Latin) JOO-no(English)
Rating: 53% based on 97 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "young", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
Kai 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: KIE(German, Swedish, Finnish, English)
Rating: 52% based on 96 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of Gerhard, Nicolaas, Cornelis or Gaius. It is borne by a boy captured by the Snow Queen in an 1844 fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. Spreading from Germany and Scandinavia, this name became popular in the English-speaking world and other places in Western Europe around the end of the 20th century.
Kezia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 41% based on 92 votes
Variant of Keziah.
Lachlan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Rating: 58% based on 92 votes
Anglicized form of Lachlann, the Scottish Gaelic form of Lochlainn. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Lincoln
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LING-kən
Rating: 43% based on 89 votes
From an English surname that was originally from the name of an English city, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
Lise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: LEEZ(French, English) LEE-seh(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LEES(English)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 44% based on 66 votes
Short form of Elisabeth or Elizabeth.
Mack 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAK
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 30% based on 83 votes
From a surname, originally a shortened form of various Irish and Scottish surnames beginning with Mac or Mc (from Irish mac meaning "son"). It is also used as a generic slang term for a man.
Mackenzie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-KEHN-zee
Personal remark: or Mackinlay
Rating: 34% based on 93 votes
From a Scottish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coinnich, itself derived from the given name Coinneach. As a feminine given name it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-), especially after she began appearing on the television comedy One Day at a Time in 1975. In the United Kingdom it is more common as a masculine name.
Mae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 57% based on 87 votes
Variant of May. A famous bearer was the American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
Maëlle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: MA-EHL(French)
Rating: 51% based on 87 votes
Feminine form of Maël.
Makaio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Rating: 37% based on 82 votes
Hawaiian form of Matthew.
Matea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Personal remark: Mattea
Rating: 48% based on 89 votes
Croatian feminine form of Mateo.
Mateo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Croatian
Pronounced: ma-TEH-o(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 89 votes
Spanish form of Matthew. This form is also sometimes used in Croatia, from the Italian form Matteo.
Miles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
Rating: 62% based on 79 votes
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

In Scotland this name was historically used to Anglicize Maoilios.

Milo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: MIE-lo(English)
Rating: 59% based on 92 votes
Old Germanic form of Miles, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century [2].
Miriam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Rating: 64% based on 92 votes
Hebrew form of Mary. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
Monroe
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mən-RO
Rating: 37% based on 52 votes
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Northern Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).

As a given name it was mostly masculine in America until around 2009. It was already rising in popularity for girls when singer Mariah Carey gave it to her daughter born 2011 (though this probably helped accelerate it).

Montgomery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mənt-GUM-ə-ree, mənt-GUM-ree
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 46% based on 89 votes
From an English surname meaning "Gumarich's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
Morgan 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: MAWR-gən(English)
Rating: 42% based on 85 votes
Modern form of Morgen, which was used by Geoffrey of Monmouth [1] in the 12th century for the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was unnamed in earlier stories. Geoffrey probably did not derive it from the Welsh masculine name Morgan, which would have been spelled Morcant in his time. It is likely from Old Welsh mor "sea" and the suffix gen "born of" [2].
Morley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAWR-lee
Rating: 23% based on 62 votes
From a surname that was originally from an Old English place name meaning "marsh clearing".
Murdoch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 27% based on 15 votes
Anglicized form of Muireadhach.
Nadia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя(Russian, Bulgarian) Надія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA(French) NAD-ee-ə(English) NAHD-ee-ə(English) NA-dyə(Russian)
Rating: 56% based on 91 votes
Variant of Nadya 1 used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century [1]. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-) [2].
Nadine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: NA-DEEN(French) na-DEE-nə(German) na-DEEN(German) nay-DEEN(English)
Rating: 42% based on 89 votes
French diminutive of Nadia 1.
Naomi 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: nay-O-mee(English) nie-O-mee(English)
Rating: 56% based on 92 votes
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omi) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara because of her misfortune (see Ruth 1:20).

Though long common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer is the British model Naomi Campbell (1970-).

Narelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 30% based on 81 votes
Meaning unknown. It was borne by the wife of Umbarra, who was a 19th-century leader of the Yuin, an Australian Aboriginal people.
Natalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλία(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian, Bulgarian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Spanish) na-ta-LEE-a(Italian) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 91 votes
Latinate form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Niko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Croatian, Slovene, Georgian, German
Other Scripts: ნიკო(Georgian)
Pronounced: NEE-ko(Finnish)
Rating: 44% based on 78 votes
Finnish form of Nicholas, as well as a Croatian, Slovene, Georgian and German short form.
Odell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: o-DEHL
Rating: 24% based on 58 votes
From an English surname that was originally from a place name, itself derived from Old English wad "woad" (a plant that produces a blue dye) and hyll "hill".
Plum
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PLUM
Rating: 46% based on 30 votes
From Middle English ploume, from Old English plume "plum, plum tree," from an early Germanic borrowing (Middle Dutch prume, Dutch pruim, Old High German pfluma, pfruma, German Pflaume) from Vulgar Latin *pruna, from Latin prunum "plum," from Greek prounon, a later form of proumnon, a word of unknown origin, which is probably, like the tree itself, of Anatolian origin.
Quidel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche (Hispanicized)
Rating: 23% based on 25 votes
Possibly from Mapuche küde meaning "burning torch".
Quincy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KWIN-see
Rating: 39% based on 30 votes
From an English surname that was derived (via the place name Cuinchy) from the personal name Quintus. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts. Both the town and the president were named after his maternal great-grandfather John Quincy (1689-1767). Another notable bearer is the American musician Quincy Jones (1933-).
Rae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 38% based on 84 votes
Short form of Rachel. It can also be used as a feminine form of Ray.
Reid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REED
Rating: 47% based on 57 votes
From a surname, a Scots variant of Reed.
Roman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAWN-man(Polish) RO-man(Czech, German) RAW-man(Slovak) RO-mən(English)
Rating: 58% based on 35 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
Romilly
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare)
Rating: 49% based on 20 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the name of various Norman towns, themselves from the given name Romilius.
Romy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, French, English
Pronounced: RO-mee(German, English)
Rating: 50% based on 21 votes
Diminutive of Rosemarie or Rosemary.
Rónán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: RO-nahn(Irish)
Rating: 58% based on 65 votes
Means "little seal", derived from Old Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early Irish saints, including a pilgrim to Brittany who founded the hermitage at Locronan in the 6th century.
Rowan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 65% based on 41 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ruadhán. As an English name, it can also be derived from the surname Rowan, itself derived from the Irish given name. It could also be given in reference to the rowan tree, a word of Old Norse origin (coincidentally sharing the same Indo-European root meaning "red" with the Irish name).
Sabina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Сабина(Russian)
Pronounced: sa-BEE-na(Italian, Spanish) sa-BYEE-na(Polish) SA-bi-na(Czech)
Rating: 46% based on 88 votes
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "a Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
Sadie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Rating: 48% based on 93 votes
Diminutive of Sarah.
Simone 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese
Pronounced: SEE-MAWN(French) sə-MON(English) zee-MO-nə(German)
Rating: 45% based on 82 votes
French feminine form of Simon 1. A famous bearer was Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
Soraya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Spanish, French, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: ثریا(Persian)
Pronounced: so-ray-YAW(Persian) so-RA-ya(Spanish)
Rating: 45% based on 66 votes
Persian form of Thurayya. It became popular in some parts of Europe because of the fame of Princess Soraya (1932-2001), wife of the last Shah of Iran, who became a European socialite.
Stellan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 50% based on 34 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
Sterling
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
Rating: 50% based on 62 votes
From a Scots surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
Sullivan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: SUL-i-vən(English)
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 47% based on 84 votes
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Súileabháin, itself from the given name Súileabhán, which was derived from Irish súil "eye" and dubh "dark, black" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name has achieved a moderate level of popularity in France since the 1970s. In the United States it was rare before the 1990s, after which it began climbing steadily. A famous fictional bearer of the surname was James P. Sullivan from the animated movie Monsters, Inc. (2001).
Sunniva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 42% based on 34 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
Tadeo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ta-DHEH-o
Rating: 35% based on 82 votes
Spanish form of Thaddeus.
Tamsin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-zin
Personal remark: mn
Rating: 55% based on 69 votes
Contracted form of Thomasina. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.
Tate
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAYT
Rating: 39% based on 86 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
Tatum
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAY-təm
Rating: 30% based on 86 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English. It was brought to public attention by the child actress Tatum O'Neal (1963-) in the 1970s, though it did not catch on. It attained a modest level of popularity after 1996, when it was borne by a character in the movie Scream.
Tennyson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEHN-ə-sən
Rating: 34% based on 75 votes
From an English surname that meant "son of Tenney", Tenney being a medieval form of Denis. A notable bearer of the surname was the British poet Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892), commonly called Lord Tennyson after he became a baron in 1884.
Tiago
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: tee-A-goo(European Portuguese) chee-A-goo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 38% based on 82 votes
Portuguese form of James, derived from Santiago.
Titus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: TEE-toos(Latin) TIE-təs(English) TEE-tuws(German)
Rating: 41% based on 87 votes
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.

This name appears in the New Testament belonging to a companion of Saint Paul. He became the first bishop of Crete and was the recipient of one of Paul's epistles. This was also the praenomen of all three Roman emperors of the 1st-century Flavian dynasty, and it is the name by which the second of them is commonly known to history. Shakespeare later used it for the main character in his tragedy Titus Andronicus (1593). As an English name, Titus has been occasionally used since the Protestant Reformation.

Whitaker
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIT-ə-kər
Rating: 32% based on 51 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "white field" in Old English.
Yolanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: yo-LAN-da(Spanish) yo-LAHN-də(English)
Rating: 29% based on 33 votes
From the medieval French name Yolande, which was probably a form of the name Violante, which was itself a derivative of Latin viola "violet". Alternatively it could be of Germanic origin.

This name was borne by a 12th-century empress of the Latin Empire in Constantinople, who was originally from Flanders. It was also used by her descendants in the royal families of Hungary (spelled Jolánta) and Spain (sometimes spelled Violante). The Blessed Yolanda of Poland was a daughter of Béla IV of Hungary who married a Polish duke. It was also borne by Yolanda of Vianden, a 13th-century countess from Luxembourg who joined a convent against her parents' wishes, later becoming the subject of medieval legend. Another notable bearer was a 15th-century duchess of Lorraine, the subject of the opera Iolanta (1892) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

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