Ancient Names

These names were used in various ancient regions.
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EUSEBIOSmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ευσεβης (eusebes) meaning "pious", itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and σεβω (sebo) "to worship, to honour". This was the name of several saints.
EUSEBIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of EUSEBIOS. This was the name of a 4th-century historian of the Christian church.
EUSTACHYSmAncient Greek
Means "fruitful" in Greek. It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and σταχυς (stachus) "ear of corn".
EUSTATHIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ευσταθιος (Eustathios), derived from the Greek word ευσταθης (eustathes) meaning "well-built, stable". It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and ‘ιστημι (histemi) "to stand, to set up". This was the name of a few early saints, including the 2nd-century martyr also known as Eustachius (see Eustace).
EUSTORGIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eustorgios (see EUSTORGIO).
EUTHALIAfAncient Greek
Means "flower, bloom" from the Greek word ευθαλεια (euthaleia), itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and θαλλω (thallo) "to blossom".
EUTHYMIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευθυμιος (Euthymios) which meant "in good spirits", derived from the word ευθυμος (euthymos), which was composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and θυμος (thymos) "soul, spirit". This was the name of several early saints.
EUTROPIAfAncient Greek
Feminine form of Eutropios (see EUTROPIUS).
EUTROPIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευτροπιος (Eutropios), which was derived from the word ευτροπος (eutropos) "versatile", formed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and τροπος (tropos) "direction, manner, fashion".
EUTYCHIAfAncient Greek
Feminine form of Eutychios (see EUTYCHIUS).
EUTYCHIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευτυχιος (Eutychios), a variant of Eutychos (see EUTYCHUS). This was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
EVARISTUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευαριστος (Euaristos) meaning "well pleasing" from the Greek word ευαρεστος (euarestos), derived from ευ (eu) "good, well" and αρεστος (arestos) "pleasing". This was the name of the fifth pope, supposedly martyred under Emperor Hadrian.
EWALDmGerman, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ewa "law, custom" and wald "rule".
EYDÍSfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
EYSTEINNmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and steinn meaning "stone".
FABIAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FABIUS.
FABIANAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FABIANUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of FABIAN.
FABIOLAfItalian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Diminutive of FABIA. This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome.
FABIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin faba "bean". Quintus Fabius Maximus was the Roman general who used delaying tactics to halt the invasion of Hannibal in the 3rd century BC.
FABRICIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Fabricius (see FABRICE).
FABRICIUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of FABRICE.
FARAMUNDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and mund "protection". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century king of the Franks.
FARVALDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and wald "power, leader, ruler".
FAUSTINAfAncient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Faustinus (see FAUSTINO).
FAUSTUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "auspicious, lucky" in Latin. It was also occasionally used as a praenomen, or given name. This was the name of several early Christian saints.
FEIDLIMIDm & fAncient Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "beauty" or "ever good" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of three early kings of Munster.
FELIXmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FERDINANDmGerman, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FESTUSmAncient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman cognomen which possibly meant "festival, holiday" in Latin. This was the name of a Roman official in the New Testament.
FILIBERTmGerman (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "much brightness" from the Germanic elements filu "much" and beraht "bright".
FLAVIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which meant "golden" or "yellow-haired" from Latin flavus "yellow, golden". Flavius was the family name of the 1st-century Roman emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian. It was used as a personal name by several later emperors, notably by Constantine.
FLORIANAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Italian feminine form of FLORIAN.
FLORUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin flos meaning "flower".
FOLCHERmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of VOLKER.
FRANCO (1)mItalian, Ancient Germanic
Italian form of FRANK (1), as well as an older Germanic form.
FREDENANDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and nand "daring, brave".
FRIDAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
FRIDENOTmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and not "need".
FRIDUHELMmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of FRIEDHELM.
FRIDUMANmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of FRIEDEMANN.
FRIDUMARmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and mari "famous".
FRIDURICmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of FREDERICK.
FRIDWALDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of FRIEDHOLD.
FRÍÐAfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse cognate of FRIDA, also in part derived from Old Norse fríðr meaning "beautiful, beloved".
FRIÐUSWIÞfAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of FRIDESWIDE.
FULBERTmFrench, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements fulc "people" and beraht "bright". Saint Fulbert was an 11th-century bishop of Chartres.
FULCOmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of FULK.
FULVIAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
GAIANAfAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Γαιανη (Gaiane), a derivative of GAIA. This was the name of a (perhaps fictional) martyr who was killed in Armenia during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian in the late 3rd century.
GAIUSmAncient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman praenomen, or given name, of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This was a very common Roman praenomen, the most famous bearers being Gaius Julius Caesar, the great leader of the Roman Republic, and his adopted son Gaius Octavius (later known as Augustus), the first Roman emperor. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint.
GALCHOBHARmAncient Irish
Means "foreign help" in Irish.
GALENEfAncient Greek
Greek feminine form of GALEN.
GALENOSmAncient Greek
Original Greek form of GALEN.
GALLUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which meant "rooster" in Latin. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.
GASTOmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GASTON.
GAUFRIDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements gawia "territory" and frid "peace".
GAUTAMAmSanskrit
In the case of Siddhartha Gautama, a patronymic form of GOTAMA. Siddhartha Gautama, also known as Buddha, the founder of Buddhism, was a 6th-century BC nobleman who left his family in order to lead a life of meditation and poverty.
GAUTSTAFRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form (possibly) of GUSTAV. This form is only attested in the Old Norse period belonging to a horse.
GEBAHARDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GEBHARD.
GEBHARDmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element geb "gift" combined with hard "brave, hardy". Saint Gebhard was a 10th-century bishop of Constance.
GEIRRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GEIR.
GENNADIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Γενναδιος (Gennadios), which was derived from Greek γενναδας (gennadas) "noble, generous". Saint Gennadius was an early martyr from North Africa.
GERBERNmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GERBEN.
GERBOLDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger meaning "spear" and bald meaning "bold".
GERFRIDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GERFRIED.
GERHARDmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of GERARD.
GERHILDfGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
GERLACHmDutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with laic "play". Saint Gerlach was a 12th-century Dutch soldier who became a hermit.
GERMANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "brother" in Latin. This was the name of several early saints.
GERMUNDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and mund "protection".
GERNOTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hnod "crush".
GEROmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear".
GERULFmGerman (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GERVASIUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name with a first element deriving from ger "spear". Saint Gervasius was an early martyr from Milan whose remains were discovered in the 4th century.
GILBERTmEnglish, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILTBERTmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements gild "sacrifice, value" and beraht "bright".
GISBERTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GISELBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GILBERT.
GISELMUNDmAncient Germanic
From the Germanic elements gisil meaning "hostage, pledge" and mund meaning "protection".
GISILAfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GISELLE.
GISILBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GILBERT.
GISILFRIDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements gisil "hostage" and frid "peace".
GISLENUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Gislin (see GHISLAIN).
GISLINmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GHISLAIN.
GISMUNDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name, possibly a variant of GISELMUND or SIGISMUND using shortened forms of the initial element.
GLÆDWINEmAnglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GLAUCIAm & fAncient Roman
Latin form of GLÁUCIO.
GNAEUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown Etruscan meaning, though it may be related to Latin naevus "birthmark". A famous bearer was Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, also known as Pompey the Great, a Roman general of the 1st century BC.
GODAm & fAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element god meaning "good".
GODABERTmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and beraht "bright".
GODEHARDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and hard "hardy, brave". This was the name of an 11th-century saint who was a bishop of Hildesheim.
GODELIVAfAncient Germanic
Feminine form of GOTELEIB. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.
GODGIFUfAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of GODIVA.
GODIVAfAnglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
GODRICmAnglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman conquest.
GODWINEmAnglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend". This was the name of the powerful 11th-century Earl of Wessex, the father of King Harold II of England.
GOTELEIBmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and leub "dear, beloved".
GOZZOmAncient Germanic
Originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element Gaut meaning "Goth".
GRATIANAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Gratianus (see GRATIAN).
GRÍMHILDRfNorse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of KRIEMHILD. In the Norse 'Volsungasaga' Grímhildr is the mother of Gunnar and Gudrun, while in the later Germanic counterpart the 'Nibelungenlied' Kriemhild is the sister of Günther and she herself has a role equivalent to Gudrun.
GRIMWALDmAncient Germanic
From the Germanic elements grim "mask" and wald "power, leader, ruler".
GULLAfAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GULL.
GUMARICHmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements guma meaning "man" and ric meaning "power, rule".
GUNDAfGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNDHRAMmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GUNTRAM.
GUNDISALVUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Old Germanic (Latinized) form of GONZALO.
GUNNImAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of GUNNE.
GUÐLAUGfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements guð meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
GUÐRÍÐRfAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse name derived from the elements guð "god" and fríðr "beautiful".
GUÐRÚNfAncient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of GUDRUN, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
GWRTHEYRNmAncient Celtic
Means "supreme king" from Welsh gor meaning "over" and teyrn meaning "king, monarch". It is possible that this is not a name, but a title. Gwrtheyrn (also known as Vortigern) was a 5th-century king of the Britons. It was he who invited Horsa and Hengist to Britain, which eventually led to the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.
GYÐAfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of GYTHA.
HADEWIGfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HEDWIG.
HADRIANUSmAncient Roman
Original Roman form of HADRIAN.
HADUBERTmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu "battle" and beraht "bright".
HADUFUNSmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and funs "ready".
HAGNEfAncient Greek
Greek form of AGNES.
HAILWICfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HEILWIG.
HAIMOmAncient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element heim meaning "home".
HÁKONmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of HÅKON, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
HÁLFDANmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of HALFDAN.
HALLBJÖRNmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements hallr "rock" and björn "bear".
HALLRmAncient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse hallr meaning "rock".
HAMILCARmAncient Near Eastern (Latinized), History
Means "brother of Melqart" from Phoenician ha "brother" combined with the name of the god MELQART. Hamilcar was a 3rd-century BC Carthaginian general, the father of Hannibal.
HAMMURABImAncient Near Eastern, History
From the Akkadian name Hammu-rapi, possibly derived from Amorite meaning "uncle is a healer". This was the name of an 18th-century BC king of Babylon who conquered Sumer and Akkad. He is also known for devising a written code of laws.
HANNIBALmAncient Near Eastern (Latinized), History
Means "grace of Ba'al" from Phoenician hann "grace" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hannibal was the Carthaginian general who threatened Rome during the Second Punic War in the 3rd century BC.
HARDMANmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTMANN.
HARDMODmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTMUT.
HARDUWICHmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTWIG.
HARDWINmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTWIN.
HARIBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HERBERT.
HARIMANmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HERMAN.
HARIWALDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HAROLD.
HARIWINImAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERWIN.
HARSHAmIndian, Kannada, Telugu, Sanskrit
Means "happiness" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 7th-century emperor of northern India. He was also noted as an author.
HARTMUTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave mind", derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and muot "mind, spirit".
HARTWIGmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
HARTWINmGerman (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".
HASDRUBALmAncient Near Eastern (Latinized), History
Means "Ba'al helps" from Phoenician azru "help" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hasdrubal was a Carthaginian general, the brother of Hannibal.
HATSHEPSUTfAncient Egyptian
Means "foremost of noble women" in Egyptian. This was the name of a pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. She may have been the first woman to take the title of Pharaoh.
HÁVARÐRmAncient Scandinavian
From the Old Norse elements "high" and varðr "guardian, defender".
HEARDmAnglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEIDRICHmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements heid "kind, sort, type" and ric "power, ruler".
HEIMIRICHmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HENRY.
HEINRICHmGerman, Ancient Germanic
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HELENEfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELEWIDISfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ELOISE.
HELGImAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of HELGE.
HELMFRIDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HELMFRIED.
HELMOmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ELMO.
HELMOLDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements helm "helmet" and wald "rule".
HELMUTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element helm "helmet" or heil "healthy" combined with muot "spirit, mind".
HENGISTmAncient Germanic
Of Germanic origin, meaning "stallion". Hengist and his brother Horsa were the leaders of the first Germanic settlers in Britain. Hengist established a kingdom in Kent in the 5th century.
HERACLEITUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ηρακλειτος (Herakleitos) which meant "glory of Hera", derived from the name of the goddess HERA combined with κλειτος (kleitos) "glory". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher from Ephesus.
HERACLIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek personal name ‘Ηρακλειος (Herakleios) which was derived from the name of the Greek hero HERAKLES. This was the name of a 7th-century Byzantine emperor, known for his victories over the Sassanid Persian Empire. This name was also borne by two early saints.
HERAISfAncient Greek
Ancient Greek personal name which was probably derived from the name of the Greek goddess HERA.
HERAKLEIDESmAncient Greek
Means "son of Herakles" in Greek, derived from the name of the mythic hero HERAKLES combined with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides).
HEREWARDmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HEREWEALDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HERLEIFRmAncient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements herr "army" and leifr "son, descendant".
HERLEVAfAncient Germanic
Germanic name, possibly a derivative of hari "army", era "honour", or erla "noble" (or their Old Norse cognates). This was the name of the mother of William the Conqueror, who, according to tradition, was a commoner.
HERMAGORASmAncient Greek
From the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek αγορα (agora) meaning "assembly, marketplace". Saint Hermagoras (3rd century) was the first bishop of Aquileia in Italy.
HERMANmEnglish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
HERMESmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Probably from Greek ‘ερμα (herma) meaning "cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker". Hermes was a Greek god associated with speed and good luck, who served as a messenger to Zeus and the other gods. He was also the patron of travellers, writers, athletes, merchants, thieves and orators.... [more]
HERMINIUSmAncient Roman
Roman name which was possibly of unknown Etruscan origin, but could also be derived from the name of the god HERMES. In Roman legend this was the name of a companion of Aeneas.
HERMOGENESmAncient Greek
Means "born of Hermes" from the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek γενης (genes) "born".
HERMOKRATESmAncient Greek
Means "power of Hermes" from the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek κρατος (kratos) "power".
HERMOLAOSmAncient Greek
Means "the people of Hermes" from the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek λαος (laos) "people".
HERODOTUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ηροδοτος (Herodotos), derived from the name of the goddess HERA combined with δοτος (dotos) meaning "given, granted". Herodotus was a Greek historian of the 5th century BC who wrote about Persian and the Persian Wars. He is known as the Father of History.
HEROIDESmAncient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HERODES.
HEROIDIASfAncient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HERODIAS.
HEROIDIONmAncient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HERODION.
HERONmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HESIODmAncient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ησιοδος (Hesiodos), which probably means "to throw song" from ‘ιημι (hiemi) "to throw, to speak" and ωιδη (oide) "song, ode". This was the name of an 8th-century BC Greek poet.
HESPEROSmAncient Greek
Means "evening" in Greek. This was the name of the personification of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) in Greek mythology.
HIERONYMOSmAncient Greek
Original Greek form of JEROME.
HIERONYMUSmGerman, Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of JEROME used in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HILARIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of HILARIUS.
HILARIONmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ιλαρος (hilaros) meaning "cheerful". This was the name of a 4th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Anthony.
HILARIUSmAncient Roman
Roman name which was derived from Latin hilaris meaning "cheerful". Alternatively, it could be derived from the Greek name ‘Ιλαρος (Hilaros) also meaning "cheerful" (the Greek word ‘ιλαρος was the source of the Latin word hilaris). Saint Hilarius was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Poitiers. This was also the name of a 5th-century pope.
HILDfAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of HILDA.
HILDAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDEBRANDmGerman (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
HILDEFONSmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ILDEFONSO.
HILDEGARDfGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILDIMARmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HILMAR.
HILDITRUTfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HILTRUD.
HILDRfAncient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Old Norse cognate of HILDA. In Norse legend this was the name of a valkyrie.
HIPPOCRATESmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ιπποκρατης (Hippokrates) which meant "horse power", derived from the elements ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek doctor who is known as the Father of Medicine.
HIPPOLYTOSmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "freer of horses" from Greek ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" and λυω (luo) "to loosen". In Greek legend he was the son of Theseus who was tragically loved by his stepmother Phaedra. This was also the name of a 3rd-century theologian, saint and martyr.
HJÖRDÍSfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "sword goddess", derived from Old Norse hjörr "sword" and dís "goddess".
HLÍFfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of LIV (1).
HOMERmEnglish, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the 'Iliad', about the Trojan War, and the 'Odyssey', about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
HOMEROSmAncient Greek
Original Greek form of HOMER.
HORATIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of HORATIUS.
HORATIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin hora "hour, time, season", though the name may actually be of Etruscan origin. A famous bearer was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, a Roman lyric poet of the 1st century BC who is better known as Horace in the English-speaking world.
HORSAmAncient Germanic
From the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse". Horsa and his brother Hengist were the leaders of the first Germanic settlers to arrive in Britain.
HORTENSIAfAncient Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of the Roman family name Hortensius, possibly derived from Latin hortus "garden".
HRAFNmIcelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
HRÓARRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse name, derived from the element hróðr "fame" combined with either geirr "spear" (making it a relation of HRÓÐGEIRR), arr "warrior" or varr "vigilant, cautious". This is the name of a legendary Danish king, the same one who is featured in the Anglo-Saxon poem 'Beowulf' with the name Hroðgar.
HRODEBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROBERT.
HRODERICHmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RODERICK.
HRODGERmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROGER.
HRODLANDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROLAND.
HRODOHAIDISfAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type" (see ROSE).
HRODULFmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of RUDOLF.
HRŒREKRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of Hroderich (see RODERICK).
HROLFmAncient Germanic
Contracted form of HRODULF.
HROÐGARmAnglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion. In the Old English poem 'Beowulf' this is the name of the Danish king.
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