CloudsAreFluffie's Personal Name List

ABBEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AB-ee
Personal note: Abigail's nickname
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.

ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-ə-gayl (English), A-bee-giel (German)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy", derived from the roots אָב ('av) meaning "father" and גִּיל (gil) meaning "joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigil refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play 'The Scornful Lady' (1616) which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ADRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), A-dryan (Polish), A-dree-an (German), u-dryi-AN (Russian)
Personal note: "Another Everlasting"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

AFANASY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Афанасий (Russian)
Pronounced: u-fu-NA-syee
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Variant transcription of AFANASIY.

ALANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Feminine form of ALAN.

ALEX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Other Scripts: Αλεξ (Greek), Алекс (Russian)
Pronounced: A-liks (English), A-leks (Dutch), A-LEKS (French), AW-leks (Hungarian)
Personal note: Alexander's nickname
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: AL-is (English), A-LEES (French), a-LEE-che (Italian)
Personal note: "Another Everlasting"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Swedish
Pronounced: a-LEE-thya (European Spanish), a-LEE-sya (Latin American Spanish), ə-LEE-shə (English), ə-LEE-see-ə (English)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
Latinized form of ALICE.

AMAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, Spanish
Personal note: "Another Everlasting"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Variant of AMAIA.

AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), a-ME-lya (Spanish, Italian, Polish), ah-MAY-lee-ah (Dutch), a-ME-lee-a (German)
Personal note: "Everlasting"/"Another Everlasting"
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

ANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Ана (Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), ანა (Georgian)
Pronounced: A-na (Spanish)
Personal note: Anastasia's nickname
Form of ANNA.

ANASTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αναστασια (Greek), Анастасия (Russian), Анастасія (Ukrainian, Belarusian), ანასტასია (Georgian)
Pronounced: u-nu-stu-SYEE-yə (Russian), a-nə-STAY-zhə (English), a-nə-STAS-yə (English), a-nas-TA-sya (Spanish), a-nas-TA-zya (Italian), A-NA-STA-SEE-A (Classical Greek)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.

ANDREA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Андреа (Serbian)
Pronounced: AN-dree-ə (English), an-DRE-a (German), AWN-dre-aw (Hungarian)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.

ANNABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AN-ə-bel (English)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.

ANNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
Pronounced: A-NET (French), ə-NET (English), a-NE-tə (German)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).

ARATA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-RA-TA
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From Japanese (arata) meaning "fresh, new". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.

AUDREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-dree
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

BELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEL
Personal note: Annabelle's nickname
Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.

BIANCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka (Italian), BYAN-ka (Romanian)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).

BREE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: BREE
Personal note: "All the Small Things"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Anglicized form of BRÍGH.

BRIDGETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIJ-it
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Variant of BRIDGET.

CASEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: KAY-see (English)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.

CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: se-SEE-lee-ə (English), se-SEEL-yə (English), che-CHEE-lya (Italian), the-THEE-lya (European Spanish), se-SEE-lya (Latin American Spanish), se-SEEL-yah (Danish, Norwegian)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CHAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAD
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.

CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT (French), SHAHR-lət (English), shar-LAW-tə (German), shah-LOT (Swedish), shahr-LAWT-tə (Dutch)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.

CHRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: KRIS (English), KRHIS (Dutch)
Personal note: Christen's nickname
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.

CHRISTEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Variant of KRISTEN (1).

CLARENCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAR-əns
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
From the Latin title Clarensis which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.

CLARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: klə-RIS-ə (English)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.

COLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.

CRYSTAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-təl
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.

DAMIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DA-MYEN
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
French form of DAMIAN.

DANTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DAN-te
Personal note: "Another Everlasting"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the 'Divine Comedy'.

DEIDRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEE-drə
Personal note: "All the Small Things"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Variant of DEIRDRE.

DELILAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

DREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Personal note: Andrea's nickname
Short form of ANDREA (2).

DUNCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUN-kən (English)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).

EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EM-ə-lee
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), who wrote 'Wuthering Heights', and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EM-ee (English)
Personal note: Emily's nickname
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.

ESPEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish
Personal note: "All the Small Things"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Variant of ASBJØRN.

ESTEBAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: es-TE-ban
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
Spanish form of STEPHEN.

EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV (English)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century.

EVELYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EV-ə-lin (English), EEV-lin (British English), EEV-ə-lin (British English), E-və-leen (German)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.

FAYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Variant of FAY.

GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה (Hebrew), حنّة (Arabic)
Pronounced: HAN-ə (English), HA-na (German)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna, which is used in the New Testament, has traditionally been more common as a Christian name.

HAYLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.

HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HIDEAKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 英明, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KHEE-DE-A-KYEE
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" and (aki) meaning "bright", as well as other combinations of kanji.

JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JESS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JES
Personal note: Jessica's nickname
Short form of JESSE or JESSICA.

JESSICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: JES-i-kə (English), ZHE-SEE-KA (French), YE-see-ka (German)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).

KAITLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Variant of CAITLIN.

KIMBERLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIM-bər-lee
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.

KIMMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIM-ee
Personal note: Kimberly's nickname
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).

LAURENCE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAW-rəns
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England, partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury. Likewise it has been common in Ireland due to the 12th-century Saint Laurence O'Toole (whose real name was Lorcán). Since the 19th century the spelling Lawrence has been more common, especially in America. A famous bearer was the British actor Laurence Olivier (1907-1989).

LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)
Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian
Pronounced: LE-a (German), LE-ah (Finnish)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Form of LEAH.

LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LE-o (German, Danish, Finnish), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 理, 立, 黎, 力, 丽, etc. (Chinese)
Pronounced: LEE
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
From Chinese () meaning "reason, logic", () meaning "stand, establish", () meaning "black, dawn", () meaning "power, capability, influence" (which is usually only masculine) or () meaning "beautiful" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.

LOGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LO-gən (English)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.

LOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: LO-la (Spanish), LO-lə (English)
Personal note: "Le Cirque de Rouge"
Diminutive of DOLORES.

LOUIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: LWEE (French), LOO-is (English), LOO-ee (English), loo-EE (Dutch)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.

Apart from royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common.

The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde', and American jazz musician Louis Armstrong (1901-1971).

LUCIFER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LOO-si-fər (English)
Personal note: "Another Everlasting"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". In Latin this name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven (see Isaiah 14:12). In later literature, such as the 'Divine Comedy' (1321) by Dante and 'Paradise Lost' (1667) by John Milton, Lucifer became associated with Satan himself.

LYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN
Personal note: Evelyn's nickname
Variant of LYNN.

MARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρια (Greek), Мария (Russian, Bulgarian), Марія (Ukrainian), Маріа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a (Italian, German, Dutch, Greek), mu-REE-u (European Portuguese), ma-REE-u (Brazilian Portuguese), mə-REE-ə (Catalan, English), mah-REE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAR-ya (Polish), MAH-ree-ah (Finnish), mu-RYEE-yə (Russian), mu-RYEE-yu (Ukrainian)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
Other Scripts: Мартин (Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MAHR-tin (English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), MAR-TEN (French), MAR-teen (German, Slovak), MAWR-teen (Hungarian), mar-TIN (Bulgarian), MAHR-teen (Finnish)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.

An influential bearer of the name was Martin Luther (1483-1546), the theologian who began the Protestant Reformation. The name was also borne by five popes (two of them more commonly known as Marinus). Other more recent bearers include the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968), and the American filmmaker Martin Scorsese (1942-).

MAX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Russian
Other Scripts: Макс (Russian)
Pronounced: MAKS (German, English, Russian)
Personal note: Maxwell's nickname
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English). It is also a variant transcription of Russian MAKS.

MAXWELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAKS-wel
Personal note: "Another Everlasting"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.

MEI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 美, 梅, etc. (Chinese)
Pronounced: MAY
Personal note: Second part to 'Shun Mei'
From Chinese (měi) meaning "beautiful" or (méi) meaning "Chinese plum" (species Prunus mume), as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.

MITZI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: MIT-see
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
German diminutive of MARIA.

ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DET
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

RAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY
Personal note: Raven's nickname
Short form of RACHEL. It can also be used as a feminine form of RAY.

RAVEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-vən
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.

RODGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAH-jər
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Variant of ROGER.

RON (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHN
Personal note: Ronald's nickname
Short form of RONALD.

RONALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAHN-əld (English)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).

RŮŽENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".

SABRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə (English), sa-BREE-na (Italian), za-BREE-na (German), SA-BREE-NA (French)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque 'Comus' (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play 'Sabrina Fair' (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.

SAM (1)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAM
Personal note: Samuel and Samantha's nicknames
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.

SAMANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: sə-MAN-thə (English)
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show 'Bewitched'.

SAMUEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: שְׁמוּאֵל (Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAM-yoo-əl (English), SAM-yəl (English), SA-MWEL (French), ZA-mwel (German), sa-MWEL (Spanish), sa-MOO-el (Polish), SAH-moo-el (Swedish, Finnish)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.

As a Christian name, Samuel came into common use after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include American inventor Samuel Morse (1791-1872), Irish writer Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), and American author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), who wrote under the pen name Mark Twain.

SARAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂרָה (Hebrew), سارة (Arabic)
Pronounced: SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English), SA-RA (French), ZA-ra (German), SA:-ra (Arabic)
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).

In England, Sarah came into use after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Sarah Churchill (1660-1744), an influential British duchess and a close friend of Queen Anne.

SHUN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: , etc. (Chinese)
Pronounced: SHWUN
Personal note: First part of 'Shun Mei'; "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From Chinese (shùn) meaning "obey, submit" or other characters which are pronounced similarly.

SKYLER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.

STACEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAY-see
Personal note: "Checkmate!"
Variant of STACY.

STAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.

SYLVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEEL-VEE
Personal note: "Euthanasia Game"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
French form of SILVIA.

TAYLOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAY-lər
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).

TIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEE-ə
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
Short form of names ending with tia. It has been suggested that its use since the 1950s is the result of the brand name for the coffee liqueur Tia Maria. In the brand name, Tia is not a given name; rather, it means "aunt" in Spanish or Portuguese.

VAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAL
Personal note: Valerie's nickname
Short form of VALENTINE (1), VALERIE, and other names beginning with Val.

VALERIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: VAL-ə-ree (English), VA-lə-ree (German)
Personal note: "All the Small Things"
English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.

VERONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
From the name of the city in Italy, which is itself of unknown meaning.

VINCENC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovene
Personal note: "Checkmate!"/"Le Cirque de Rouge"
Czech and Slovene form of VINCENT.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.