Names Categorized "ends in -ita"

This is a list of names in which the categories include ends in -ita.
gender
usage
ADELITA f Spanish (Latin American)
Spanish diminutive of ADELA. It is used especially in Mexico, where it is the name of a folk song about a female soldier.
AELITA f Literature, Russian, Latvian
Created by Russian author Aleksey Tolstoy for his science fiction novel Aelita (1923), where it belongs to a Martian princess. In the book, the name is said to mean "starlight seen for the last time" in the Martian language.
AFËRDITA f Albanian
Means "daybreak, morning" in Albanian, from afër "nearby, close" and ditë "day".
ALITA f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of ALETHEA.
AMITA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Feminine form of AMIT (1).
AMRITA f Indian, Hindi, Punjabi, Bengali
Feminine form of AMRIT.
ANAHITA f Persian, Persian Mythology
Means "immaculate, undefiled" from Avestan a "not" and ahit "unclean". This was the name of the Persian goddess of fertility and water. She was sometimes identified with Artemis, Aphrodite and Athena.
ANGELITA f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of ANGELA.
ANITA (1) f Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
BONITA f English
Means "pretty" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin bonus "good". It has been used as a name in the English-speaking world since the beginning of the 20th century.
GHIȚĂ m Romanian
Diminutive of GHEORGHE.
IOVITA m & f Ancient Roman
Latin masculine and feminine form of JOVITA.
MIHĂIȚĂ m Romanian
Romanian diminutive of MICHAEL.
MIKITA m Belarusian
Belarusian form of NIKETAS.
NIKITA (1) m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian form of NIKETAS. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.
TERESITA f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of TERESA.
VITA (2) f Ukrainian, Belarusian
Ukrainian and Belarusian short form of VIKTORIYA.
ZITA (1) f Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, Latvian
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
ZITA (2) f Hungarian
Diminutive of FELICITÁS.