Names Categorized "gentleness"

This is a list of names in which the categories include gentleness.
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ADALLINDIS f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and lind "soft, tender, flexible".
BELINDA f English
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related to Italian bella "beautiful". The second element could be Germanic lind meaning "flexible, soft, tender" (and by extension "snake, serpent"). This name first arose in the 17th century, and was subsequently used by Alexander Pope in his poem 'The Rape of the Lock' (1712).
CAOIMHE f Irish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CLEMENT m English
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
DIETLINDE f German
From the Germanic name Theudelinda, derived from the elements theud "people" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Theudelinda was a 6th-century queen of the Lombards.
ERMELINDA f Italian
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and lind "soft, tender, flexible".
ERMINLINDA f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERMELINDA.
ETHELINDA f English (Archaic)
English form of the Germanic name ADALLINDIS. The name was very rare in medieval times, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
GERLINDE f German, Dutch
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible".
HELLÄ f Finnish
Means "gentle, tender" in Finnish.
JEONG f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (jeong) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" or (jeong) meaning "virtuous, chaste, loyal", as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
JEONG-HUI f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (jeong) meaning "right, proper, correct" or (jeong) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" combined with (hui) meaning "beauty" or (hui) meaning "bright, splendid, glorious". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
JI-MIN f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" or (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" combined with (min) meaning "gentle, affable", (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "jade, stone resembling jade". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
JING m & f Chinese
From Chinese (jìng) meaning "quiet, still, gentle", (jīng) meaning "essence, spirit", (jīng) meaning "clear, crystal" or (jīng) meaning "capital city". Other characters can also form this name.
JINGYI m & f Chinese
From Chinese (jìng) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" combined with () meaning "joy, harmony". Other character combinations are possible as well.
JONG f & m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see JEONG).
JUNG f & m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see JEONG).
JUNG-HEE f & m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 정희 (see JEONG-HUI).
KEEFE m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh meaning "descendant of CAOMH".
KEVIN m English, Irish, French (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
KYO m & f Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji or or or (see KYOU).
KYOU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (kyou) meaning "unite, cooperate", (kyou) meaning "capital city", (kyou) meaning "village", (kyou) meaning "apricot", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
KYUNG m & f Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see GYEONG).
LATIF m Arabic
Means "gentle, kind" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition اللطيف (al-Latif) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
LINDA f English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINDE f Dutch
Dutch variant of LINDA.
LINZA f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LINDA.
LYNDA f English
Variant of LINDA.
MAYUMI f Filipino, Tagalog
Means "tender, soft, modest" in Tagalog.
MILBURGA f History
Derived from the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress". Saint Milburga, the sister of Saint Mildred, was a daughter of a 7th-century Mercian king. She was supposedly in possession of magical powers.
MILDRED f English
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman Conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MIYU f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "evening". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MRIDULA f Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit मृदु (mridu) meaning "soft, delicate, gentle".
MUNGO m Scottish
Possibly derived from Welsh mwyn "gentle, kind". This was a nickname of the 6th-century Saint Kentigern.
NEASA f Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning uncertain. In Irish legend she was the mother of Conchobhar, king of Ulster. According to some versions of the legend she was originally named Assa meaning "gentle", but was renamed Ni-assa "not gentle" after she sought to avenge the murders of her foster fathers.
RAFIQ m Arabic, Urdu
Means either "friend" or "gentle" in Arabic.
ROSALEEN f English (Rare)
Variant of ROSALINE. James Clarence Mangan used it as a translation for RÓISÍN in his poem 'Dark Rosaleen' (1846).
ROSALIN f English (Rare)
Medieval variant of ROSALIND.
ROSALINA f Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of ROSALINE.
ROSALIND f English
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy 'As You Like It' (1599).
ROSALINDA f Spanish, Italian
Latinate form of ROSALIND.
ROSALINE f English
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's 'Love's Labour's Lost' (1594) and 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
ROSALYN f English
Variant of ROSALINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ROSELYN f English
Variant of ROSALYN.
ROSLINDIS f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSALIND.
ROSLYN f English
Variant of ROSALYN.
SÉGOLÈNE f French
Possibly a French form of SIEGLINDE.
SIEGLINDE f German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied'.
SIGILIND f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGLINDE.
THEUDELINDA f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of DIETLINDE.
YUI f Japanese
From Japanese (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" combined with (i) meaning "clothing, garment". It can also come from standalone (yui) using a different nanori reading. This name can be formed of other kanji or kanji combinations as well.
YUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other combinations of kanji.
YUUKA f Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" and (ka) meaning "flower, blossom". It can also be composed of different kanji that have the same pronunciations.
YUUKI m & f Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely" combined with (ki) meaning "hope", (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
YUUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness", (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely" or (yuu) meaning "abundant" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed of different kanji characters as well.
YUUNA f Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yuu) meaning "grapefruit, pomelo, citrus fruit" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" or (na), a phonetic character. Other combinations of kanji are also possible.