mairinn's Personal Name List

AEMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
AITHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Possibly a variant of EITHNE.
ALASDAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Scottish form of ALEXANDER.
ALEC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-ik
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Short form of ALEXANDER.
ALEJANDRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-leh-KHAN-dro
Spanish form of ALEXANDER. This was the most popular name for boys in Spain from the 1990s until 2006 (and again in 2011).
ALEKS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Slovene, Polish
Other Scripts: Алекс(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: A-lyiks(Russian) A-lehks(Polish)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Short form of ALEKSEY, ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
ALEKSANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Slovene, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: a-leh-KSAN-dehr(Polish)
Form of ALEXANDER in several languages.
ALEKSANDRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Александрина(Russian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of ALEKSANDRA.
ALEKSANTERI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AH-lehk-sahn-teh-ree
Finnish form of ALEXANDER.
ALEX
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Other Scripts: Αλεξ(Greek) Алекс(Russian)
Pronounced: AL-iks(English) A-lehks(Dutch, Italian, Romanian, Czech) A-LEHKS(French) A-lekhs(Icelandic) AW-lehks(Hungarian)
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Hungarian
Pronounced: ə-LEHK-sə(English) AW-lehk-saw(Hungarian)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Short form of ALEXANDRA.
ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα(Greek) Александра(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-drə(English) a-leh-KSAN-dra(German, Romanian) ah-lək-SAHN-drah(Dutch) A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA(French) a-leh-KSAN-dhra(Greek) u-li-SHUNN-dru(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dru(Brazilian Portuguese) A-lehk-san-dra(Czech, Slovak) a-lehk-SAN-dra(Spanish, Italian) A-LEH-KSAN-DRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Pronounced: A-LUG-ZAHNDR(French) u-li-SHUNN-dri(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dree(Brazilian Portuguese) a-leh-SHAN-dreh(Galician) ə-lək-SAN-drə(Catalan)
Form of ALEXANDER in several languages. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote The Three Musketeers.
ALEXANDRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SAHN-DREE
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
French variant of ALEXANDRA.
ALEXANDRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-ig-zan-DREE-nə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the first name of Queen Victoria; her middle name was Victoria.
ALEXANDRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SAHN-DREEN
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of ALEXANDRA. This was the name of a Danish queen, the wife of King Christian X.
ALEXANDROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος(Greek)
Pronounced: a-LEH-ksan-dhraws(Greek) A-LEH-KSAN-DROS(Classical Greek)
Greek form of ALEXANDER.
ALEXINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ik-SEE-nə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of ALEX, or a diminutive of ALEXIS.
ALLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-ee
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA and other names beginning with the same sound.
ALYX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AL-iks
Feminine variant of ALEX.
AMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Variant of either AMALIA or EMILIA.
ANETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Scandinavian variant of ANNETTE.
ANGLIA
Usage: Late Roman, Polish, Hungarian, Romanian
Late Latin form of ENGLAND (and also of ANGEL).
ANGLIYA
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Англия(Russian, Bulgarian)
Russian and Bulgarian form of ENGLAND.
ANKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Анка(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: ANG-ka(Polish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of ANNA.
ANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Αννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-nah(Norwegian, Finnish) AN-nah(Danish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

ANNE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
Pronounced: AN(French, English) A-neh(Swedish) A-nə(Danish, German) AHN-neh(Finnish) AH-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
French form of ANNA. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.

The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in Anne of Green Gables (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.

ANNEKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: AH-nə-kə
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Dutch diminutive of ANNA.
ANNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
Pronounced: A-NEHT(French) ə-NEHT(English) a-NEH-tə(German)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: AN-ee(English) A-NEE(French)
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
BABETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: BA-BEHT(French)
French diminutive of ELIZABETH or BARBARA.
BETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BETH
Short form of ELIZABETH, or sometimes BETHANY.
BILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIL
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Short form of WILLIAM. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name. Famous bearers include basketball player Bill Russell (1934-), comedian Bill Cosby (1937-), American president Bill Clinton (1946-), and Microsoft founder Bill Gates (1955-).
BILLIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIL-ee
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of BILL. It is also used as a feminine form of WILLIAM.
BILLY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIL-ee
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of BILL. A notable bearer was the American outlaw Billy the Kid (1859-1881), whose real name was William H. Bonney.
BOWEN
Usage: Welsh
From Welsh ap Owain meaning "son of OWAIN".
BOWEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Transferred use of the surname BOWEN.
BRENNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREHN-ən(English)
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRENNAN
Usage: Irish
From Irish Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán", a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRITAIN
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRI-tən
From Britannia, the Latin name for the island of Great Britain, the land of the Britons. It derives from the name of the Britons, recorded in Greek in the 4th century BC as Πρεττανικη (Prettanike), and reconstructed as Proto-Brythonic *Priteni, possibly meaning "tattooed people".
BRITANNIEN
Usage: German, Swedish, Danish
German, Swedish and Danish form of BRITAIN.
CAELESTIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "of the sky, heavenly".
CEES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: KEHS
Variant of KEES.
CÉLESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-LEST
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.
CELESTE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: cheh-LEH-steh(Italian) sə-LEST(English)
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CHELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL
Diminutive of MICHELLE.
CHIARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: kya-REE-na
Diminutive of CHIARA.
CLAIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
French form of CLARA.
CLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Spanish, Italian) KLA-ru(Portuguese) KLA-RA(French) KLEHR-ə(American English) KLAR-ə(American English) KLAH-rə(British English)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Diminutive of CLARA.
CLARETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Diminutive of CLARA.
CLARIBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHR-ə-behl, KLAR-ə-behl
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix bel. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene (in the form Claribell) and by Shakespeare in his play The Tempest (1611). Alfred Lord Tennyson also wrote a poem entitled Claribel (1830).
CLARINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: klə-RIN-də
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix inda. It was first used by Edmund Spenser in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
DAGMAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: DAK-mar(German) DAG-mar(Czech)
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.
DEC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Short form of DECLAN.
DECLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: DEHK-lən(English)
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.
DRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Diminutive of ADRIANA or ALEXANDRINA.
EEMI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EH-mee
Finnish variant form of EMIL.
EEMIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EH-meel
Finnish form of EMIL.
ÉIRE
Usage: Irish
Possibly means "abundant land" in Old Irish. This is the Irish name of the country and island of Ireland. According to legend the island was named for the goddess ÉRIU, though in fact it was she who was named for the island.
EIREANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Irish (Rare)
Pronounced: EHR-ən
From Éireann, the genitive case of Gaelic Éire, meaning "Ireland". It is commonly Anglicized as Erin.
EITHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: EH-nyə
Means "kernel, grain" in Irish. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint, sister of Saint Fidelma and follower of Saint Patrick.
ELAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-LAYN(English) ee-LAYN(English)
From an Old French form of HELEN. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation Le Morte d'Arthur Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the appearance of Tennyson's Arthurian epic Idylls of the King (1859).
ELEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Short form of ELEANOR. This was also the name of an ancient Italian town (modern Velia) that is well known for being the home of the philosopher Parmenides and his student Zeno of Elea, who was famous for his paradoxes.
ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELEANORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehl-ə-NAWR-ə
Latinate form of ELEANOR.
ELEANORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Variant of ELEANOR.
ELENORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehl-ə-NAWR-ə
Variant of ELEANOR.
ELIINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EH-lee-nah
Finnish form of HELEN.
ELIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Pronounced: EH-lin(Swedish, Norwegian, Welsh)
Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN.
ELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian, Swedish
Pronounced: EH-lee-nah(Finnish) eh-LEE-nah(Swedish)
Finnish, Estonian and Swedish form of HELEN.
ELINOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Variant of ELEANOR.
ELISABET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, Spanish, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ελισαβετ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: eh-LEE-sa-beht(Swedish, Norwegian) eh-LEE-sa-behd(Danish) EH-lee-sah-beht(Finnish) eh-lee-sa-BEHT(Spanish)
Scandinavian and Finnish form of ELIZABETH. It is also used in Spain alongside the traditional form Isabel.
ELISABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: eh-LEE-za-beht(German) eh-LEE-sa-beht(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian) eh-LEE-sa-behd(Danish) i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELIXABETE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of ELIZABETH.
ELIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: i-LIE-zə(English) eh-LYEE-za(Polish)
Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation My Fair Lady (1956).
ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: EHL-ə(English) EHL-lah(Finnish)
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El. It can also be a short form of names ending in ella.
ELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHL
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
ELLEN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ən
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 19th century, when the form Helen also became common.
ELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El.
ELNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Contracted form of ELEANORA.
ELSABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of ELIZABETH.
ELYZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth
Variant of ELIZABETH.
EMIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
Other Scripts: Емил(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) Эмиль(Russian)
Pronounced: EH-mil(Swedish, Czech) EH-meel(German, Slovak, Hungarian) eh-MEEL(Romanian) EH-myeel(Polish) eh-MYEEL(Russian) ə-MEEL(English) EHM-il(English)
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
ÉMILE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MEEL
French form of Aemilius (see EMIL). This name was borne by French author Émile Zola (1840-1902).
EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) eh-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
ÉMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MEE-LEE
French feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMÍLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: EH-mee-li-yeh
Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lyə(German) eh-MEE-lee-eh(Norwegian) EHM-i-lee(Swedish)
German, Scandinavian and Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMĪLIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Latvian
Latvian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Емилија(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: EH-mee-lee-ya(Serbian, Croatian)
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Bulgarian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMĪLS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Latvian
Latvian form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-lee
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

This name was moderately popular through most of the 20th century, and became very popular around the turn of the 21st century. It was the highest ranked name for girls in the United States from 1996 to 2007, attaining similar levels in other English-speaking countries around the same time.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), known for the novel Wuthering Heights, and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EHM-mee
Short form of names beginning with Em.
EMMIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ee
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.
EMMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Dutch, German
Pronounced: EHM-ee(English)
Diminutive of EMMA or EMILY.
ENGLALAND
Usage: Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ENGLAND.
ENGLAND
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: ING-glənd(English) ENG-lant(German)
From Old English Englaland meaning "land of the Angles", the Angles being one of the Germanic tribes that settled in the area in the post-Roman period.
ENYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EHN-yə
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ÉRIU
Usage: Ancient Irish
Old Irish form of ÉIRE.
ÉRIU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
From the name of an Irish goddess, who according to legend gave her name to Ireland (which is called Éire in Irish). In reality, the goddess probably got her name from that of the island, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
FRIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FREE-dah(Swedish)
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
GALBRAITH
Usage: Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Ethnic name for someone descended from a tribe of Britons living in Scotland, from Gaelic gall ‘stranger’ + Breathnach ‘Briton’ (i.e. ‘British foreigner’). These were either survivors of the British peoples who lived in Scotland before the Gaelic invasions from Ireland in the 5th century (in particular the Welsh-speaking Strathclyde Britons, who survived as a distinctive ethnic group until about the 14th century), or others who had perhaps migrated northwestwards at the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasions.
GIACINTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ja-CHEEN-to
Italian form of HYACINTHUS.
GWIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Welsh short form of GWILYM.
GWILYM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Welsh form of WILLIAM.
HANNE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: HA-nə(German) HAHN-neh(Swedish) HA-neh(Norwegian) HAN-neh(Danish)
Variant of HANNA (1).
HELEENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HEH-leh-nah
Finnish variant of HELENA.
HELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHL-ən(English)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.

The name was originally used among early Christians in honour of the saint, as opposed to the classical character. In England it was commonly spelled Ellen during the Middle Ages, and the spelling Helen was not regularly used until after the Renaissance. A famous bearer was Helen Keller (1880-1968), an American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.

HELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Portuguese, Catalan, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene, Croatian, Sorbian, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEH-leh-na(German, Czech) heh-LEH-na(German) heh-LEH-nah(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) i-LEH-nu(European Portuguese) eh-LEH-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) ə-LEH-nə(Catalan) kheh-LEH-na(Polish) HEH-leh-nah(Finnish) HEHL-ə-nə(English) hə-LEEN-ə(English)
Latinate form of HELEN.
HELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: heh-LEHN(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) heh-LEH-nə(German) HEH-LEH-NEH(Classical Greek)
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HEH-lee
Diminutive of HELENA.
HOLANDIA
Usage: Polish
Polish form of HOLLAND (1), referring to the entire country of the Netherlands.
HOLANDIJA
Usage: Serbian
Other Scripts: Холандија(Serbian)
Serbian form of HOLLAND (1), referring to the entire country of the Netherlands.
HOLANDIYA
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Холандия(Bulgarian)
Bulgarian form of HOLLAND (1), referring to the provinces and sometimes the entire country.
HOLLAND (1)
Usage: Dutch, English, German
Pronounced: HAW-lahnt(Dutch) HAHL-ənd(English)
From Old Dutch holt "forest" and lant "land". This is the name of two provinces (North and South Holland) in the Netherlands. It is sometimes used to refer to the entire country of the Netherlands.
HOLLANDE
Usage: French
French form of HOLLAND (1), referring to the provinces and sometimes the entire country.
HYACINTH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: ‘Υακινθος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth(English)
English form of HYACINTHUS.
HYACINTH (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see HYACINTHUS).
HYACINTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Latinate feminine form of HYACINTHUS, used to refer to the 17th-century Italian saint Hyacintha Mariscotti (real name Giacinta).
HYACINTHE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: YA-SEHNT
French masculine and feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
HYACINTHUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Υακινθος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Υακινθος (Hyakinthos), which was derived from the name of the hyacinth flower. In Greek legend Hyakinthos was accidentally killed by the god Apollo, who mournfully caused this flower to arise from his blood. The name was also borne by several early saints, notably a 3rd-century martyr who was killed with his brother Protus.
HYAKINTHOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: ‘Υακινθος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HUY-A-KEEN-TOS(Classical Greek)
Greek form of HYACINTHUS.
IERLAND
Usage: Dutch
Dutch form of IRELAND.
ILSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: IL-za
Variant of ILSE.
ILSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: IL-zə(German)
German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH.
IRLAND
Usage: German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German, Danish, Norwegian and Swedish form of IRELAND.
IRLANDIA
Usage: Polish
Polish form of IRELAND.
IRLANDIYA
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ирландия(Russian, Bulgarian)
Russian and Bulgarian form of IRELAND.
ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEHL(Spanish) IZ-ə-behl(English) EE-ZA-BEHL(French) ee-za-BEHL(German)
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISABELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEH-la(Spanish)
Latinate form of ISABEL.
JACEK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: YA-tsehk
Modern form of JACENTY.
JACENTY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: ya-TSEHN-ti
Polish form of HYACINTHUS. Saint Jacenty was a 13th-century Dominican monk from Krakow who was said to have taken missionary journeys throughout northern Europe and Asia.
JACI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JACINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of JACINTA.
JACINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: kha-THEEN-ta(European Spanish) kha-SEEN-ta(Latin American Spanish)
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
JACINTH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAY-sinth, JAS-inth
From the English word for the orange precious stone, originating from the same source as Hyacinth.
JACINTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: yah-SIN-tah
Latinate form of JACINTHE.
JACINTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHA-SEHNT
French cognate of HYACINTH (2).
JACINTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: kha-THEEN-to(European Spanish) kha-SEEN-to(Latin American Spanish)
Spanish and Portuguese form of HYACINTHUS.
JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

JACKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-ee
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JACKIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-ee
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JACKIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Variant of JANKIN.
JACKY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHA-KEE
Diminutive of JACQUES.
JACQUES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHAHK
French form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JACQUETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Feminine diminutive of JACQUES.
JACQUETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Feminine diminutive of JACQUES.
JACQUI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: JAK-ee
Short form of JACQUELINE.
JOCK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: JAHK
Scottish form of JACK.
JOCKIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Scottish diminutive of JACK.
JOCKY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Scottish diminutive of JACK.
JOHN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: JAHN(American English) JAWN(British English, Dutch) YAWN(Swedish, Norwegian)
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular, typically being the most common male name from the 13th to the 20th century (but sometimes outpaced by William). During the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys. In the United States it was the most common name for boys until 1923.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

The forms Ian (Scottish), Sean (Irish) and Evan (Welsh) have also been frequently used in the English-speaking world, as has the medieval diminutive Jack.

KEES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: KEHS
Dutch diminutive of CORNELIS. A notable bearer was the Dutch painter Kees van Dongen (1877-1968).
KENT
Usage: English
Pronounced: KENT
Possibly from a Brythonic element meaning "border, edge, coast". This is the name of a historic kingdom and modern county in southeastern England, called Cent in Old English, Cantium in Latin. It is also the name of a river in Cumbria, northwestern England.
KLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian
Other Scripts: Клара(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: KLA-ra(German, Polish) KLA-rə(Russian)
Form of CLARA in various languages.
LANCELOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: LAN-sə-laht(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly an Old French diminutive of Lanzo (see LANCE). In Arthurian legend Lancelot was the bravest of the Knights of the Round Table. He became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere, ultimately causing the destruction of Arthur's kingdom. His earliest appearance is in the works of the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes.
LEXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHK-sə
Short form of ALEXANDRA or ALEXA.
LEXIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHK-see
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LEXINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHK-seen
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LILI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French, Hungarian
Pronounced: LI-lee(German) LEE-LEE(French)
German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.
LILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LEE-lya(Spanish) LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Spanish and Italian form of LILY, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Лилия or Ukrainian Лілія (see LILIYA).
LILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, English
Pronounced: lee-LYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Latinate form of LILLIAN.
LILIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: lee-LYAN-na(Polish) lil-ee-AN-ə(English)
Variant of LILIANA.
LILIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Лилия(Russian, Bulgarian) Лілія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: LYEE-lyi-yə(Russian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian cognate of LILY.
LILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən
Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.
LILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: LIL-ee(English)
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINNÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: lin-NEH-a
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.
LINNEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish
Pronounced: lin-NEH-a(Swedish)
Variant of LINNÉA.
LISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Pronounced: LEE-sə(English) LEE-za(German, Italian) LEE-sah(Dutch)
Short form of ELIZABETH and its cognates in other languages. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the Mona Lisa, the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.

In the United States this form was more popular than the full form Elizabeth from 1958 to 1978, and was in fact the top ranked American name between 1962 and 1969.

LISETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: LEE-ZEHT(French)
Diminutive of ÉLISABETH.
LIVIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIV-ee-ə
Short form of OLIVIA.
LIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian
Other Scripts: Лиза(Russian)
Pronounced: LIE-zə(English) LEE-zə(English)
Short form of ELIZABETH or YELIZAVETA.
LIZETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LIZZIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIZ-ee
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LYSETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of LISETTE.
MAIKEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MIE-kəl
Dutch variant form of MICHAEL.
MAJA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Polish, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Маја(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: MA-ya(German, Polish)
Diminutive of MARIA.
MAREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: MAH-rehn(Danish)
Danish form of MARINA.
MARIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρια(Greek) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

MARIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: MA-REE(French) MA-ri-yeh(Czech) ma-REE(German) mə-REE(English)
French and Czech form of MARIA. It has been very common in France since the 13th century. At the opening of the 20th century it was given to approximately 20 percent of French girls. This percentage has declined steadily over the course of the century, and it dropped from the top rank in 1958.

A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

In France it is occasionally used as a masculine name in pairings such as Jean-Marie.

MARIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian
Other Scripts: Марија(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-ya(Slovene)
Form of MARIA in several languages.
MARION (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: MA-RYAWN(French) MEHR-ee-ən(English) MAR-ee-ən(English)
Medieval French diminutive of MARIE.
MARIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of MARIA.
MARYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ma-RI-la
Polish diminutive of MARIA.
MARYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Марина(Ukrainian) Марына(Belarusian)
Ukrainian and Belarusian form of MARINA.
MARYSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ma-RI-sha
Polish diminutive of MARIA.
MERLE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MURL
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERYL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-əl
Variant of MURIEL, influenced by the spelling of the name CHERYL. A famous bearer is American actress Meryl Streep (1949-), whose real name is Mary Louise Streep.
MICAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Portuguese
Pronounced: MEE-ka-ehl(Swedish)
Swedish and Portuguese variant form of MICHAEL.
MICHA (2)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Short form of MICHAEL or MICHAELA.
MICHAËL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, French
Pronounced: MEE-KA-EHL(French)
Dutch and French form of MICHAEL.
MICHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Μιχαηλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MIE-kəl(English) MI-kha-ehl(German, Czech) MEE-ka-ehl(Swedish) MEE-kah-ehl(Norwegian) MEE-kal(Danish) mee-KA-ehl(Classical Latin)
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel).

In the United States, this name rapidly gained popularity beginning in the 1930s, eventually becoming the most popular male name from 1954 to 1998. However, it was not as overwhelmingly common in the United Kingdom, where it never reached the top spot.

Famous bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MICHAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak, Greek
Other Scripts: Μιχαελα(Greek)
Pronounced: mi-kha-EH-la(German) mi-KAY-lə(English) MI-kha-eh-la(Czech) MEE-kha-eh-la(Slovak)
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHAŁ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: MYEE-khow
Polish form of MICHAEL.
MICHALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: myee-kha-LYEE-na
Polish feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEE-SHEHL(French) MI-khəl(German) MEE-shehl(Dutch)
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICHELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-KEH-la
Italian feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHELE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-KEH-leh
Italian form of MICHAEL.
MICHELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-keh-LEE-na
Feminine diminutive of MICHELE (1).
MICHELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: MEE-SHEHL(French) mi-SHEHL(English)
French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.
MICHI (2)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German
German diminutive of MICHAEL or MICHAELA.
MICHIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: mi-KHEEL
Dutch form of MICHAEL.
MICKAËL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-KA-EHL
French variant form of MICHAEL.
MIEP
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MEEP
Dutch diminutive of MARIA.
MIHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Pronounced: MEE-kha-ehl(Slovene)
Slovene and Croatian form of MICHAEL.
MIHAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Slovene, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Михаела(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: mee-ha-YEH-la(Romanian) MEE-kha-eh-la(Slovene) mee-HA-ehl-a(Croatian)
Feminine form of MIHAIL or MIHAEL.
MIĤAELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: mee-kha-EH-lo
Original Esperanto form of MICHAEL.
MIHKEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian
Estonian form of MICHAEL.
MIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene
Short form of MARIJA.
MIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Croatian variant of MIA.
MIKAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Breton
Pronounced: MEE-ka-ehl(Swedish, Norwegian) MEE-kal(Danish) MEE-kah-ehl(Finnish)
Scandinavian, Finnish and Breton form of MICHAEL.
MIKAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: MEE-kah-eh-lah(Finnish)
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MIKEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of MICHAEL.
MIKELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: mee-KEH-lo
Modern Esperanto form of MICHAEL.
MIKHA'EL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Biblical Hebrew form of MICHAEL.
MIKHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל(Hebrew) Μιχαηλ(Ancient Greek)
Modern Hebrew form of MICHAEL, as well as an alternate Greek transcription.
MIKKEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: MEEG-gehl(Danish) MEEK-kehl(Norwegian)
Danish form of MICHAEL. It can also derive from the Scandinavian root mikill meaning "enormous".
MIKKELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish
Danish feminine form of MIKKEL.
MIKKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MEEK-ko
Finnish form of MICHAEL.
MILJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MEE-lyah
Short form of EMILIA.
MILLE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Danish and Norwegian short form of EMILIE (feminine) and Swedish short form of EMIL (masculine).
MILLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-ee
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: MIL-ee(English)
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MIQUEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: mee-KEHL
Catalan form of MICHAEL.
MÍŠA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: MEE-sha
Diminutive of MICHAELA.
MIŠA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Миша(Serbian)
Serbian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound. In Slovenia it is typically feminine.
MISHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Миша(Russian)
Pronounced: MYEE-shə
Russian diminutive of MIKHAIL.
MISHO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: მიშო(Georgian) Мишо(Bulgarian)
Georgian diminutive of MIKHEIL and a Bulgarian diminutive of MIHAIL.
MISI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Diminutive of MIHÁLY.
MIŚKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Diminutive of MICHALINA.
MISKA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian, Finnish
Pronounced: MEES-kah(Finnish)
Diminutive of MIHÁLY or MIKAEL.
MIŠKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Мишко(Serbian)
Serbian and Croatian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIHAEL, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MITXEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of MICHAEL.
NANETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: nə-NEHT
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NEDERLAND
Usage: Dutch, Norwegian
Pronounced: NEH-dər-lahnt(Dutch)
Dutch and Norwegian cognate of NETHERLANDS.
NEDERLÄNDERNA
Usage: Swedish
Swedish cognate of NETHERLANDS.
NETHERLANDS
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEDH-ər-ləndz
From English nether meaning "lower" and land, referring to the low-lying position of the country. This is the name of a country in northwestern Europe. It is sometimes called Holland in English, though this is properly one of its subregions. In English it is usually referred to using the definite article, the.
NIDERLANDIYA
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Нидерландия(Bulgarian)
Bulgarian form of NETHERLANDS.
NIDERLANDY
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Нидерланды(Russian)
Russian form of NETHERLANDS.
Ó BRAONÁIN
Usage: Irish
Irish Gaelic form of BRENNAN.
OLA (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: OO-la
Norwegian and Swedish short form of OLAF.
OLA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: AW-la
Polish short form of ALEKSANDRA.
OLAF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
Pronounced: O-laf(German) O-lahf(Dutch) AW-laf(Polish)
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
OLANDA
Usage: Italian
Italian form of HOLLAND (1), referring to the provinces and sometimes the entire country.
OLAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish
Variant of OLAF.
OLEK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: AW-lehk
Short form of ALEKSANDER.
OLI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHL-ee
Short form of OLIVER.
OLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish
Feminine form of OLE.
OLIVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AHL-iv(English) AW-LEEV(French)
From the English and French word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLIVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

OLIVERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Оливера(Serbian, Macedonian)
Feminine form of OLIVER.
OLIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and was ranked second in the United States by 2014. Its rise in popularity was ultimately precipitated by a character on the 1970s television series The Waltons, later reinforced by characters on other television shows [2].

OLLIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHL-ee
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
OLUF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish
Danish variant of OLAF.
OWAIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: O-wien(Welsh)
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though other theories connect it to Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in(English)
Anglicized form of OWAIN.
OWENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Feminine form of OWEN (1).
PATRICIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Pronounced: pə-TRISH-ə(English) pa-TREE-thya(European Spanish) pa-TREE-sya(Latin American Spanish) pa-TREE-tsya(German)
Feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland [1].
PATRĪCIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Latvian
Latvian form of PATRICIA.
PATRICIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: PIM
Diminutive of WILLEM.
RHYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: REES
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
SACHA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SA-SHA
French form of SASHA.
SANDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAN-dee
Variant of SANDY.
SANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Romanian
Other Scripts: Сандра(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: SAN-dra(Italian, Spanish, Polish, Czech, Romanian) SAN-drə(English) SAHN-DRA(French) ZAN-dra(German) SAHN-drah(Dutch)
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel Emilia in England (1864) and the reissued version Sandra Belloni (1887). A famous bearer is the American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SANDRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAHN-DREEN
French diminutive of SANDRA.
SANDY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAN-dee
Originally a diminutive of ALEXANDER. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of ALEXANDRA or SANDRA. It can also be given in reference to the colour.
SAŠA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Саша(Serbian)
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene diminutive of ALEKSANDER or ALEKSANDRA.
SASCHA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ZA-sha
German form of SASHA.
SASHA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Other Scripts: Саша(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: SASH-ə(English) SAH-shə(English) SA-SHA(French)
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SASHKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Сашка(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian diminutive of ALEKSANDRA, as well as an alternate transcription of Macedonian Сашка (see SAŠKA).
SASHO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Сашо(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian diminutive of ALEXANDER, as well as an alternate transcription of Macedonian Сашо (see SAŠO).
SAŠKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Сашко(Macedonian)
Macedonian diminutive of ALEXANDER.
SAŠO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Сашо(Macedonian)
Slovene and Macedonian diminutive of ALEXANDER.
SCOTLAND
Usage: English
Means "land of the Scots", from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker". This is the name of a country (part of the United Kingdom) in the north of the island of Great Britain.
SEOC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of JACK.
SHELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Probably a combination of the prefix She and LENA.
SHELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL
Short form of MICHELLE or SHELLEY. It can also be simply from the English word shell (ultimately from Old English sciell).
SHELLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL-ee
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "clearing on a bank" in Old English. Two famous bearers of the surname were Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), a romantic poet whose works include Adonais and Ozymandias, and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), his wife, the author of the horror story Frankenstein. As a feminine given name, it came into general use after the 1940s.
SHELLY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL-ee
Variant of SHELLEY.
SHELLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שלי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHEH-lee
Means "mine" in Hebrew.
SKOTLANTI
Usage: Finnish
Finnish form of SCOTLAND.
SKOTTLAND
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of SCOTLAND.
SOFIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Slovak, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Σοφια(Greek) София(Russian, Bulgarian) Софія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: zo-FEE-a(German) so-FEE-a(Italian) soo-FEE-u(European Portuguese) so-FEE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) soo-FEE-ə(Catalan) saw-FEE-a(Greek) SO-fee-ah(Finnish)
Form of SOPHIA used in various languages.
SOFIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Dutch, Czech
Pronounced: zo-FEE(German) so-FEE-ə(Danish) so-FEE(Dutch) SO-fi-yeh(Czech)
Form of SOPHIE in several languages.
SOFIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Lithuanian, Latvian
Other Scripts: Софија(Serbian, Macedonian)
Form of SOPHIA in several languages.
SOFIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: София(Russian, Bulgarian) Софія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: su-FYEE-yə(Russian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of SOPHIA.
SOHVI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SOKH-vee
Finnish form of SOPHIA.
SOPHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σοφια(Greek)
Pronounced: so-FEE-ə(English) sə-FIE-ə(British English) zo-FEE-a(German)
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels Tom Jones (1749) by Henry Fielding and The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

In the United States this name was only moderately common until the 1990s when it began rising in popularity, eventually becoming the most popular for girls from 2011 to 2013. A famous bearer is the Italian actress Sophia Loren (1934-).

SOPHIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SAW-FEE(French) SO-fee(English) zo-FEE(German)
French form of SOPHIA.
SOPHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SO-fee
Variant of SOPHIE or a diminutive of SOPHIA.
STOCKHOLM
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, German, Dutch, French
Pronounced: stawk-HAWLM(Swedish) STAW-KAWLM(French)
From Swedish stock "log" and holme "islet". The islet probably referred to Helgeandsholmen in central Stockholm. This is the name of the capital city of Sweden. The first written mention of the name occurs in 1252.
STORBRITANNIEN
Usage: Swedish, Danish
Swedish and Danish form of Great BRITAIN, also used when referring to United Kingdom.
SVERIGE
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: SVEHR-yeh(Swedish) SVAR-yə(Norwegian)
From Swedish svear "Swede" and rike "realm, kingdom". This is the Swedish, Norwegian and Danish name for Sweden.
SWEDEN
Usage: English, Medieval Dutch
Pronounced: SWEE-dən(English)
From Middle Dutch, ultimately from the Old Norse ethnic name Svíar "Swede", itself possibly from Proto-Norse Swihoniz meaning "one's own tribe". This is the name of a country in northern Europe.
SZKOCJA
Usage: Polish
Polish form of SCOTLAND.
VIVI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian diminutive of names beginning with Vi, as well as OLIVIA and SOFIA.
VREESWIJK
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: VREHS-veek(Swedish)
Possibly a habitational name from a former village and municipality in the province Utrecht, Netherlands. A notable bearer was Dutch-Swedish singer-songwriter and poet CORNELIS Vreeswijk (1937-1987).
WALES
Usage: English
A country in Europe and a part of the United Kingdom. Its name derives from the Old English Wælisc, meaning 'foreigner, Welshman'.

Its Welsh name Cymru and sometimes Gymru is derived from the Brythonic Celtic combrogi, meaning 'fellow-countrymen'. It is cognate with Modern Welsh gymrawd, meaning 'comrade, fellow'.

WILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLEM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: VI-ləm
Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.
WILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).

This name was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia. Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero (called Wilhelm in German, Guillaume in French and Guglielmo in Italian). In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

In the American rankings (since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it one of the most consistently popular names (although it has never reached the top rank). In modern times its short form, Liam, has periodically been more popular than William itself, in the United Kingdom in the 1990s and the United States in the 2010s.

WILLIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-ee
Masculine or feminine diminutive of WILLIAM. A notable bearer is the retired American baseball player Willie Mays (1931-).
WILLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: WIL-ee(English) VI-lee(German, Dutch)
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: VIM
Dutch and German short form of WILLEM or WILHELM.
XANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAN-dər(Dutch) KSAN-dər(Dutch) ZAN-dər(English)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003).
YSABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Archaic)
Medieval Spanish form of ISABEL.
ZABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Զաբել(Armenian)
Armenian form of ISABEL. A 13th-century ruling queen of Cilician Armenia bore this name.
ŻAKLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: zhak-LYEE-na
Polish form of JACQUELINE.
ZOFIJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (East Prussian), Slovene, Polish (Archaic), Lithuanian
East Prussian German variant of SOPHIA, Slovene variant of SOFIJA as well as an archaic Polish variant of ZOFIA.
ZOFIJKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kashubian
Pronounced: zaw-FEEY-kah
Diminutive of ZOFIÔ, influenced by the older form ZOFIJA.
ZWEDEN
Usage: Dutch
Dutch form of SWEDEN.
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