Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Irish.
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ABBÁNmIrish
Means "little abbot", derived from Irish abb "abbot" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint, the son of King Cormac of Leinster.
ÁDHAMHmIrish
Irish form of ADAM.
AENGUSmIrish
Variant of AONGHUS.
AIDANmIrish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AILBHEf & mIrish
Possibly derived from the old Gaelic root albho meaning "white". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint.
AILILLmIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish Gaelic. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of Queen Medb.
AILÍNmIrish
Irish cognate of ALAN.
AINDRÉASmIrish
Irish form of ANDREW.
AINDRIÚmIrish
Irish form of ANDREW.
ALAOISmIrish
Irish form of ALOYSIUS.
ALASTARmIrish
Irish form of ALEXANDER.
ALBYmIrish
Anglicized masculine form of AILBHE.
AMHLAOIBHmIrish
Irish form of OLAF.
ANGUSmScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ANRAÍmIrish
Irish form of HENRY.
AODHmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
AODHAGÁNmIrish, Scottish
Diminutive of AODH.
AODHÁNmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century. It was also borne by several characters in Irish mythology.
AONGHUSmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly meaning "one strength" derived from Irish óen "one" and gus "force, strength, energy". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was the Irish god of love and youth. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king and several Irish kings.
ARAN (1)f & mIrish
From the name of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland.
ARDALmIrish
Anglicized form of ARDGHAL.
ARDGHALmIrish
Means "high valour", derived from the Irish elements ard "high" and gal "valour".
BARRAmIrish
Variant of BAIRRE.
BARRFHIONNmIrish
Means "fair hair", derived from Gaelic barr "head" and fionn "white, fair".
BARRFINDmIrish
Older form of BARRFHIONN.
BARRYmIrish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BEARACHmIrish
Variant of BERACH.
BERACHmIrish
Derived from Gaelic biorach meaning "sharp". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
BRÁDACHmIrish
Possibly derived from a Gaelic word meaning "large-chested".
BRADENmEnglish, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".
BRADYmEnglish, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRAN (1)mIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BREANDÁNmIrish
Irish Gaelic form of BRENDAN.
BRENDANmIrish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENDANUSmIrish (Latinized)
Latinized form of Bréanainn (see BRENDAN).
BRENNANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRIANmEnglish, Irish, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
BROGANm & fIrish
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
CADOGANmWelsh, Irish
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.
CAHALmIrish
Anglicized form of CATHAL.
CAHIRmIrish
Anglicized form of CATHAIR.
CAINNEACHmIrish
Irish form of COINNEACH.
CAIRBREmIrish, Scottish
Means "charioteer" in Gaelic.
CALBHACHmIrish
Means "bald" in Irish Gaelic.
CALVAGHmIrish
Anglicized form of CALBHACH.
CAOIMHÍNmIrish
Irish form of KEVIN.
CAOLÁNmIrish
From Gaelic caol "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.
CARBREYmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARBRYmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CAREYm & fIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARROLmIrish
Variant of CARROLL.
CARROLLmIrish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'.
CÁRTHACHmIrish
Means "loving" in Irish. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CASEYm & fEnglish, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CATHAIRmIrish
Means "battle man" from Gaelic cath "battle" and vir "man".
CATHALmIrish
Derived from the Gaelic elements cath "battle" and val "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
CATHÁNmIrish
Derived from Gaelic cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CEALLACHmIrish
Irish name of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish ceallach "war, strife" or ceall "church".
CEALLACHÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CEALLACH.
CEARBHALLmIrish
Probably from Gaelic cearbh "hacking with a weapon".
CENNÉTIGmIrish
Old Irish byname meaning "armoured head" or "misshapen head". This was the name of an Irish king, the father of Brian Boru.
CHRISTIE (2)mScottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish diminutive of CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTY (2)mScottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish diminutive of CHRISTOPHER.
CIANmIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "ancient" in Gaelic. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
CIANÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.
CIARmIrish
Derived from Irish ciar meaning "black".
CIARÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.
CIARDHAmIrish
Derived from Irish ciar "black".
CILLIANmIrish
Probably from Gaelic ceall "church" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who evangelized in Franconia. He was martyred in Würzburg.
CILLÍNmIrish
Variant of CILLIAN.
CINÁEDmScottish, Irish
Means "born of fire" in Gaelic. This was the name of the first king of the Scots and Picts (9th century). It is often Anglicized as Kenneth.
CIONAODHmIrish
Modern Irish form of CINÁED.
CLANCYmIrish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh which means "son of Flannchadh". The Gaelic name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
CODYmEnglish, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
CÓEMGEINmIrish
Original Irish form of KEVIN.
COILEANmIrish
Irish form of CAILEAN.
COLIN (1)mScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLMmIrish
Variant of COLUM.
COLMÁNmIrish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLUMmIrish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.
COLUMBANmIrish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COMGANmIrish
Anglicized form of COMHGHÁN.
COMHGHALLmIrish
Means "joint pledge" from Irish comh "together" and gall "pledge".
COMHGHÁNmIrish
Means "born together" from Irish comh "together" and gan "born".
CONALLmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Gaelic. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CONANmIrish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Gaelic "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was the author who wrote the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
CONCHOBHARmIrish, Irish Mythology
Original Irish form of CONOR.
CONLETHmIrish
Modern form of the old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "chaste fire" from Gaelic connla "chaste" and aodh "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.
CONLEYmIrish
Anglicized form of CONLETH.
CONNmIrish
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.
CONORmIrish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar, derived from Old Irish con "hound, dog, wolf" and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CONRÍmIrish
Means "wolf king" in Irish Gaelic.
CORMACmIrish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
COWALmIrish
Anglicized form of COMHGHALL.
CUÁNmIrish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from the Irish element meaning "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CUIMÍNmIrish
Possibly from Celtic cam meaning "bent, crooked". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
DÁIBHÍmIrish
Irish form of DAVID.
DÁIREmIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish Gaelic. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.
DÁITHÍmIrish
Possibly means "swift" in Irish Gaelic. It is sometimes used as an Irish form of David.
DÁLACHmIrish
Derived from Irish dál meaning "assembly".
DALEYmIrish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DALYmIrish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of DALEY.
DAMHÁNmIrish
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DARA (1)mIrish
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARACHmIrish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARAGHmIrish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARRAGHmIrish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DEASÚNmIrish
Irish form of DESMOND.
DECLANmIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.
DERMOTmIrish
Anglicized form of DIARMAID.
DERRYmIrish
Diminutive of DERMOT.
DESMONDmEnglish, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
DEVINm & fEnglish, Irish
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
DIARMAIDmIrish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.
DOMHNALLmScottish, Irish
Gaelic form of DONALD.
DOMNALLmScottish, Irish
Gaelic form of DONALD.
DONAGHmIrish
Anglicized form of Donnchadh (see DUNCAN).
DÓNALmIrish
Modern Irish form of Domhnall (see DONALD).
DONALmIrish
Anglicized form of Domhnall (see DONALD).
DONNCHADHmIrish, Scottish
Gaelic form of DUNCAN.
DONOVANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".
DORANmIrish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Deoráin meaning "descendant of Deoradhán". The name Deoradhán means "exile, wanderer" in Gaelic.
DOUGALmScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger".
DOYLEmIrish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall" (see DOUGAL). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
DRISCOLLmEnglish (Rare), Irish
From an Irish surname which was an Anglicized form of Ó Eidirsceóil meaning "descendant of the messenger".
DUANEmEnglish, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Dubhán meaning "descendant of DUBHÁN".
DUBHÁNmIrish
Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DUBHGHALLmIrish, Scottish
Original Gaelic form of DOUGAL.
EACHANNmScottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
EADBHÁRDmIrish
Irish form of EDWARD.
ÉAMONmIrish
Variant of ÉAMONN. This name was borne by American-born Irish president Éamon de Valera (1882-1975), whose birth name was Edward.
EAMONmIrish
Variant of ÉAMONN.
ÉAMONNmIrish
Irish form of EDMUND.
ÉANNAmIrish
Variant of ÉNNA.
EDANmIrish, Scottish
Variant of AIDAN.
ÉIBHEARmIrish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown. According to Irish legend this name belonged to two of the sons of Míl, Éibhear Dunn and Éibhear Finn, the first of the Gaels to conquer Ireland.
ÉIMHÍNmIrish
Possibly means "swift, prompt" in Irish Gaelic.
EINRÍmIrish
Irish form of HENRY.
ENDAmIrish
Anglicized form of ÉNNA.
ÉNNAmIrish
Possibly means "bird-like" in Irish. This was the name of several Irish kings and heroes. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint who built the monastery of Killeany.
EOGHANmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "born from the yew tree" in Irish, though it is possibly derived from EUGENE. It was borne by several legendary or semi-legendary Irish figures, including a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages.
EOINmIrish, Scottish
Gaelic form of JOHN.
ERSKINEmScottish, Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of a Scottish town meaning "projecting height" in Gaelic. A famous bearer of the name was the Irish novelist and nationalist Erskine Childers (1870-1922).
FACHTNAmIrish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "hostile" in Irish Gaelic. He was the husband of Neasa in Irish legend. Some versions of the legends also have him as the father of Conchobhar.
FAOLÁNmIrish
Means "little wolf", derived from Gaelic fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.
FARQUHARmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FEARCHAR.
FEARCHARmIrish, Scottish
Means "dear man" from Gaelic fear "man" and char "dear".
FEARDORCHAmIrish
Means "dark man" from Gaelic fear "man" and dorcha "dark".
FEARGHALmIrish
Means "man of valour", derived from the Gaelic elements fear "man" and gal "valour". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Ireland.
FEARGHASmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Gaelic elements fear "man" and gus "vigour". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including the Ulster hero Fearghas mac Róich.
FECHÍNmIrish
Means "little raven" from Irish fiach "raven" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint of the 7th century who died of the yellow plague.
FELIMmIrish
Anglicized form of FEIDHLIM.
FERGALmIrish
Anglicized form of FEARGHAL.
FIACHNAmIrish
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". This was the name of a king in Irish legend.
FIACHRAmIrish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners, a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France.
FILLINmIrish
Anglicized form of FAOLÁN.
FINLAYmIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINLEYm & fIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINN (1)mIrish Mythology, Irish
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
FINNAGÁNmIrish
Diminutive of FIONN.
FINNÁNmIrish
Older form of FIONNÁN.
FINNBARRmIrish
Old Irish form of FIONNBHARR.
FINNEGANmIrish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of a character in James Joyce's novel 'Finnegans Wake' (1939), the title of which was based on a 19th-century Irish ballad called 'Finnegan's Wake'.
FINNÉNmIrish
Older form of FINNIAN.
FINNIANmIrish
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
FINTANmIrish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FIONmIrish
Variant of FIONN.
FIONNmIrish, Irish Mythology
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.
FIONNÁNmIrish
Diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
FIONNBHARRmIrish
Means "fair hair", derived from Irish fionn "white, fair" and barr "head". Saint Fionnbharr of Cork was a 6th-century bishop who supposedly performed miraculous cures. The Barry Islands off Wales were named for him.
FIONNLAGHmIrish, Scottish
Means "white warrior" from Gaelic fionn "white, fair" and laogh "warrior".
FIONNTANmIrish, Scottish
Modern Irish form of FINTAN.
FLAITHRÍmIrish
Means "king of princes" from Gaelic flaith "prince" and "king".
FLANNm & fIrish
Means "red" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of a 9th-century king of Tara in Ireland.
FLANNÁNm & fIrish
Diminutive of FLANN.
FLORRYmIrish
Anglicized form of FLAITHRÍ.
FLURRYmIrish
Anglicized form of FLAITHRÍ.
GALLAGHERmIrish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of GALLCHOBHAR".
GALLCHOBHARmIrish (Rare)
Irish name derived from gall "stranger" and cabhair "help".
GARBHÁNmIrish
Means "little rough one" from Irish garbh "rough" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint.
GARVANmIrish
Anglicized form of GARBHÁN.
GEARALTmIrish
Irish form of GERALD.
GEARÓIDmIrish
Irish form of GERARD or GERALD.
GILROYmIrish, Scottish
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
GOBÁNmIrish
Either means "little smith" from Irish gobha "smith" combined with a diminutive suffix, or else derived from the name of the Irish god GOIBNIU (which is also a derivative of gobha).
GOFRAIDHmIrish
Irish form of GODFREY.
GRADYmIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.
GRÉAGÓIRmIrish
Irish form of GREGORY.
HEBER (1)mIrish
Anglicized form of ÉIBHEAR.
IARFHLAITHmIrish
Composed of the Irish elements ior, of unknown meaning, and flaith "lord". Saint Iarfhlaith was a 6th-century bishop from Galway, Ireland.
ÍOMHARmIrish
Irish form of IVOR.
IONATÁNmIrish
Irish form of JONATHAN.
IVORmIrish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
JARLATHmIrish
Anglicized form of IARFHLAITH.
KANEmIrish
Anglicized form of CATHÁN.
KEANmIrish
Anglicized form of CIAN.
KEANEmIrish
Variant of KEAN.
KEEFEmIrish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh meaning "descendant of CAOMH".
KEEGANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
KEELANf & mIrish
Anglicized form of CAOILFHIONN, sometimes used as a masculine name.
KEENANmIrish
Anglicized form of CIANÁN.
KELANmIrish
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN.
KELLYm & fIrish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KENNEDYf & mEnglish, Irish
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).
KEVANmIrish
Variant of KEVIN.
KEVINmEnglish, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KIERANmIrish, English
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KIERONmIrish, English
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KILIANmGerman, Irish, French
German form and Irish and French variant of CILLIAN.
KILLIANmIrish, French
Anglicized variant of CILLIAN, also used in France.
KYRANmIrish
Variant of KIERAN.
LACHTNAmIrish
Means "milk-coloured" in Irish Gaelic. According to legend this was the name of an ancestor of the Irish king Brian Boru.
LAOGHAIREmIrish
Modern Irish form of LÓEGAIRE.
LEARYmIrish
Anglicized form of LAOGHAIRE.
LIAMmIrish, English
Irish short form of WILLIAM.
LOCHLAINNmIrish
Irish form of LACHLAN.
LOCHLANNmIrish
Irish form of LACHLAN.
LOMÁNmIrish
Variant of LOMMÁN.
LOMMÁNmIrish
Means "little bare one", derived from Irish Gaelic lomm "bare" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a nephew of Saint Patrick.
LONÁNmIrish
Means "little blackbird", derived from Irish Gaelic lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix.
LORCÁNmIrish
Means "little fierce one", derived from Irish Gaelic lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.
LÚCÁSmIrish
Irish form of LUCAS.
LUGHAIDHmIrish, Irish Mythology
Derived from the name of the Irish god LUGH. This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including the king Lughaidh mac Con.
MÁGHNUSmIrish
Irish form of MAGNUS.
MAHONmIrish
Anglicized form of MATHGHAMHAIN.
MAINCHÍNmIrish
Means "little monk", derived from Irish manach "monk" combined with a diminutive suffix.
MÁIRTÍNmIrish
Irish form of MARTIN.
MAITIÚmIrish
Irish form of MATTHEW.
MALACHYmIrish
Anglicized form of MÁEL SECHNAILL or MÁEL MÁEDÓC, influenced by the spelling of MALACHI. Saint Malachy (in Irish, Máel Máedóc) was a 12th-century archbishop of Armagh renowned for his miracles.
MANNIXmIrish
Anglicized form of MAINCHÍN.
MANUSmIrish
Irish form of MAGNUS.
MAOLSHEACHLANNmIrish
Modern Irish form of MÁEL SECHLAINN.
MARCASmIrish, Scottish
Irish and Scottish form of MARK.
MATHÚINmIrish
Modern Irish form of MATHGHAMHAIN.
MEALLÁNmIrish
Possibly means "lightning" in Irish Gaelic.
MELLANmIrish
Anglicized form of MEALLÁN.
MÍCHEÁLmIrish
Irish form of MICHAEL.
MUIRCHERTACHmIrish
Means "mariner" in Gaelic. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish high king.
MUIREDACHmIrish
Means "lord" in Irish. This was the name of several legendary and historical kings of Ireland.
MUIRISmIrish
Irish form of MAURICE.
MURCHADHmIrish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and cadh "warrior".
MURDOCHmIrish
Anglicized form of MUIREDACH.
MURPHYm & fIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
MURROUGHmIrish
Anglicized form of MURCHADH.
MURTAGHmIrish
Anglicized form of MUIRCHERTACH or MUIREDACH.
NAOISEmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.
NAOMHÁNmIrish, Scottish
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.
NEILmIrish, Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.... [more]
NEVANmIrish
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.
NIALLmIrish, Scottish
Original Gaelic spelling of NEIL.
NINIANmScottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.
NIOCLÁSmIrish
Irish form of NICHOLAS.
NOLANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NOLLAIGm & fIrish
Means "Christmas" in Irish.
ODHRÁNmIrish
Means "little pale green one", derived from Irish odhra "pale green, sallow" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a saint who travelled with Saint Columba through Scotland.
ODRANmIrish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
OISÍNmIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.
ORANmIrish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
ORRINmIrish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
OSCARmEnglish, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSHEENmIrish
Anglicized form of OISÍN.
OWEN (2)mIrish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
PADDYmIrish
Irish diminutive of PATRICK.
PÁDRAICmIrish
Irish form of PATRICK.
PÁDRAIGmIrish
Irish form of PATRICK.
PATRICKmIrish, English, French, German
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.... [more]
PATSYf & mEnglish, Irish
Variant of PATTY, also used as a diminutive of PATRICK.
PEADARmIrish, Scottish
Irish and Scottish form of PETER.
PHELANmIrish
Anglicized form of FAOLÁN.
PHELIMmIrish
Anglicized form of FEIDHLIM.
PIARASmIrish
Irish form of PIERS.
PILIBmIrish
Irish form of PHILIP.
PÓLmIrish
Irish form of PAUL.
PROINSIASmIrish
Irish form of FRANCIS.
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