Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is unisex; and the usage is English.
There are 270 names matching your criteria.

AAREN   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of AARON.
ADDISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help"... [more]
ALPHA   f & m   English
From the name of the first letter in the Greek alphabet, Α.
ANDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of ANDREW or ANDREA (2).
ANDY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ANDREW or sometimes ANDREA (2). American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
ANGEL   m & f   English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger")... [more]
ARDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".
ARIEL   m & f   Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour... [more]
ARLIE   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "eagle wood" in Old English. This name can also be a diminutive of ARLENE.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah... [more]
ASHTON   m & f   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
AUBREY   m & f   English
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century... [more]
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BERNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of BERNARD, BERNADETTE, BERNICE, and other names beginning with Bern.
BERNY   m & f   English
Variant of BERNIE.
BERTIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of ALBERT, HERBERT, and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BILLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of BILL. It is also used as a feminine form of WILLIAM.
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BLYTHE   f & m   English (Rare)
From a surname which meant "cheerful" in Old English.
BOBBIE   f & m   English
Variant of BOBBY. As a feminine name it can be a diminutive of ROBERTA or BARBARA.
BRAIDY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of BRADY.
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRIAR   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRONTE   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic... [more]
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
CAELAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAM (2)   m & f   English
Short form of CAMERON.
CAMERON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAREY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CAROL (1)   f & m   English
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS... [more]
CARSON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CARY   m & f   English
Variant of CAREY.
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers... [more]
CASS   f & m   English
Short form of CASSANDRA, CASSIDY, and other names beginning with Cass.
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CEDAR   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).
CELESTE   f & m   Italian, English
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CELESTINE   f & m   English
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CHANNING   m & f   English (Modern)
From an English surname of uncertain origin.
CHARLEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHEROKEE   f & m   English (Rare)
Probably derived from the Creek word tciloki meaning "people of a different speech". This is the name of a Native American people who live in the east of North America.
CHEYENNE   f & m   English
Derived from the Dakota word shahiyena meaning "red speakers". This is the name of a Native American people of the Great Plains. The name was supposedly given to the Cheyenne by the Dakota because their language was unrelated to their own... [more]
CHRIS   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CHRISTMAS   m & f   English (Rare)
From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".
CLAUDE   m & f   French, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon... [more]
COBY   m & f   English
Masculine or feminine diminutive of JACOB.
CONNIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of CONSTANCE and other names beginning with Con. It is occasionally a masculine name, a diminutive of CORNELIUS or CONRAD.
CORTNEY   f & m   English
Variant of COURTNEY.
COURTNEY   f & m   English
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose"... [more]
DAKOTA   m & f   English (Modern)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DALE   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
DANA (2)   m & f   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of 'Two Years Before the Mast'.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DARCY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
DARIAN   m & f   English
Probably an elaborated form of DARREN.
DEE   f & m   English
Short form of names beginning with D. It may also be given in reference to the Dee River in Scotland.
DELL   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who lived in a dell or valley.
DEVAN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of DEVIN.
DEVIN   m & f   English, Irish
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
DEVON   m & f   English
Variant of DEVIN. It may also be partly inspired by the name of the county of Devon in England, which got its name from the Dumnonii, a Celtic tribe.
DEVYN   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of DEVIN.
DUSTY   m & f   English
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDEN   f & m   Hebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden is the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, live before they are expelled.
EMERSON   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EMERY   m & f   English
Norman form of EMMERICH. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages... [more]
ESME   m & f   English
Variant of ESMÉ.
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
FINLEY   m & f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FLANNERY   f & m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour"... [more]
FLORENCE   f & m   English, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages... [more]
FRAN   m & f   Spanish, English, Croatian, Slovene
Short form of FRANCIS, FRANCES or related names.
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used... [more]
FRANKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.
FRANNY   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANCIS or FRANCES.
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
GABBY   m & f   English
Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE.
GARNET (2)   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname which referred either to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or who sold pomegranates (Old French pome grenate).
GARNETT   m & f   English
Variant of GARNET (2).
GAYLE   f & m   English
Variant of GAIL or GALE (2).
GEORGIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of GEORGIA or GEORGE.
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GRAY   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GREER   f & m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GREY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of GRAY.
HADLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HAPPY   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HAVEN   f & m   English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HILARY   f & m   English
Medieval English form of HILARIUS or HILARIA. During the Middle Ages it was primarily a masculine name... [more]
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel"... [more]
HOLLIS   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
INDIANA   f & m   English
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the 'Indiana Jones' series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
INDIGO   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".
ISSY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ISIDORE, ISABELLA and other names beginning with Is.
IZZY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ISIDORE, ISABEL, ISRAEL, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
JACKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JADEN   m & f   English (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan... [more]
JADYN   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAIDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAMIE   m & f   Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYLEN   m & f   African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JAYLIN   m & f   African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JERRY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JEREMY, JEROME, GERALD, GERALDINE, and other names beginning with the same sound.
JESS   m & f   English
Short form of JESSE or JESSICA.
JEWEL   f & m   English
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel... [more]
JEWELL   f & m   English
Variant of JEWEL.
JIMMIE   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of JAMES.
JO   f & m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo... [more]
JOCELYN   f & m   English, French
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Gauts, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix... [more]
JODY   f & m   English
Probably either a variant of JUDY or a diminutive of JOSEPH. It was popularized by the young hero in Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' novel 'The Yearling' (1938) and the subsequent film adaptation (1946).
JOEY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JOHNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOHN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
JOHNNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOHN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
JOJO   m & f   English
Diminutive of JOSEPH, JOLENE, and other names that begin with Jo.
JOOLS   m & f   English
Diminutive of JULIAN or JULIA.
JORDAN   m & f   English, Macedonian
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down"... [more]
JOSS   f & m   English
Short form of JOCELYN.
JOYCE   f & m   English
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord"... [more]
JULES (2)   f & m   English
Diminutive of JULIA or JULIAN.
JUSTICE   m & f   English
From an occupational surname which meant "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
JUSTY   m & f   English
Diminutive of JUSTIN or JUSTINE.
KASEY   m & f   English
Variant of CASEY.
KAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KELCEY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of KELSEY.
KELLEY   f & m   English
Variant of KELLY.
KELLY   m & f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KELSEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KENDAL   m & f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of KENDALL.
KENDALL   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENNEDY   f & m   English, Irish
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG"... [more]
KENZIE   m & f   English
Short form of MACKENZIE.
KERRY   m & f   English
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "CIAR's people".
KEVYN   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of KEVIN.
KIM (1)   f & m   English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL... [more]
KIT   m & f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
KRIS   m & f   English, Danish
Short form of KRISTIAN, KRISTOFFER, and other names beginning with Kris.
LACEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LACY.
LACY   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name which was Latinized as Lascius.
LAKE   m & f   English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
LAUREN   f & m   English
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LAURIE   f & m   English, Dutch
Diminutive of LAURA or LAURENCE (1).
LAVERN   m & f   English
Variant of LAVERNE.
LAVERNE   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder". It is sometimes associated with the Roman goddess Laverna or the Latin word vernus "of spring".
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War... [more]
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LEITH   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname, originally from the name of a Scottish town (now a district of Edinburgh), which is derived from Gaelic lìte "wet, damp". It is also the name of the river that flows though Edinburgh.
LESLEY   f & m   English
Variant of LESLIE.
LESLIE   f & m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century... [more]
LILIAN   f & m   English, French
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.
LINDSAY   f & m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English... [more]
LINDSEY   f & m   English, Scottish
Variant of LINDSAY.
LINDY   m & f   English
Originally this was a masculine name, coming into use in America in 1927 when the dance called the Lindy Hop became popular. The dance was probably named for aviator Charles Lindbergh... [more]
LOGAN   m & f   Scottish, English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
LONDON   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LOREN   m & f   English
Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).
LOU   f & m   English, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941).
LYNN   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Welsh llyn "lake". Before the start of the 20th century it was primarily used for boys, but it has since come to be more common for girls... [more]
MACKENZIE   f & m   English
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel... [more]
MADISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City... [more]
MARTIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of MARTIN, MARTINA or MARTHA.
MATTIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of MATILDA or MATTHEW.
MEADE   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which indicated one who lived on a meadow (from Middle English mede) or one who sold or made mead (an alcoholic drink made from fermented honey; from Old English meodu).
MEL   m & f   English
Short form of MELVIN, MELANIE, MELISSA, and other names beginning with Mel.
MEREDITH   m & f   Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales... [more]
MERLE   f & m   English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERLYN   m & f   English
Variant of MERLIN, sometimes used as a feminine form. It has perhaps been influenced by the Welsh word merlyn meaning "pony".
MICKEY   m & f   English
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse... [more]
MO   f & m   English
Short form of MAUREEN, MAURICE, MORRIS, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MONTANA   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the American state, which is derived from Latin montanus "mountainous".
MORGAN (1)   m & f   Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MURPHY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
NAT   m & f   English
Short form of NATHAN, NATHANIEL, NATALIE, or other names beginning with Nat.
NICKY   m & f   English
Diminutive of NICHOLAS or NICOLE.
OCEAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.
ODELL   m & f   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "woad hill" in Old English. A woad is a herb used for dying.
OLLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
ORA (1)   f & m   English
Perhaps based on Latin oro "to pray". It was first used in America in the 19th century.
PARKER   m & f   English
From an English occupational surname which meant "keeper of the park".
PARRIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris (see PARIS (2)).
PAT   m & f   English
Short form of PATRICK or PATRICIA. A famous bearer of this name was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
PATSY   f & m   English, Irish
Variant of PATTY, also used as a diminutive of PATRICK.
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress... [more]
PHOENIX   m & f   English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years... [more]
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRUDENCE   f & m   English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form... [more]
PURDIE   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Norman French expression pur die "by God". It was perhaps originally a nickname for a person who used the oath frequently.
QUINN   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
RAIN (1)   f & m   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
RAINE   f & m   English (Rare)
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana... [more]
RANDY   m & f   English
Diminutive of RANDALL, RANDOLF or MIRANDA.
RAVEN   f & m   English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
REAGAN   f & m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN"... [more]
REILLY   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RENE   m & f   English
English form of RENÉ or RENÉE.
RICKI   m & f   English
Masculine and feminine diminutive of RICHARD.
RILEY   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROBBIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of ROBERT or ROBERTA.
ROBIN   m & f   English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor... [more]
RONNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
SAGE   f & m   English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SAL   f & m   English
Short form of SALLY, SALVADOR, and other names beginning with Sal.
SAM (1)   m & f   English
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMMIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMMY   m & f   English
Diminutive of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SANDY   m & f   English
Originally a diminutive of ALEXANDER. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of ALEXANDRA or SANDRA... [more]
SATCHEL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Old English sacc meaning "sack, bag", referring to a person who was a bag maker.
SELBY   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SEPTEMBER   f & m   English (Rare)
From the name of the ninth month (though it means "seventh month" in Latin, since it was originally the seventh month of the Roman year), which is sometimes used as a given name for someone born in September.
SEQUOIA   f & m   English (Rare)
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the Cherokee scholar Sequoya (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet.
SHANNON   f & m   English
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha na tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her... [more]
SHANON   f & m   English
Variant of SHANNON.
SHELBY   m & f   English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935)... [more]
SHELLEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "clearing on a bank" in Old English. Two famous bearers of the surname were Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), a romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias', and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), his wife, the author of the horror story 'Frankenstein'... [more]
SHELLY   f & m   English
Variant of SHELLEY.
SHERIDAN   m & f   English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The name Sirideán means "searcher" in Gaelic.
SHIRLEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Bronte's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849)... [more]
SIDNEY   m & f   English
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683)... [more]
SKYLAR   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SKYLER.
SKYLER   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
SPARROW   m & f   English (Rare)
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
STACEY   f & m   English
Variant of STACY.
STACY   f & m   English
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname which was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE... [more]
STEPH   f & m   English
Short form of STEPHEN or STEPHANIE.
STEVIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of STEPHEN or STEPHANIE. A famous bearer is the American musician Stevie Wonder (1950-).
STORM   m & f   English (Modern)
From the English word storm, ultimately from Old English.
SYDNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788... [more]
TAEGAN   f & m   English (Rare)
Variant of TEAGAN.
TAYLER   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of TAYLOR.
TAYLOR   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEAGAN   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
TEMPLE   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who was associated with the Knights Templar, a medieval religious military order.
TERRY (1)   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
TERRY (2)   m & f   English
Diminutive of TERENCE or THERESA. A famous bearer was Terry Fox (1958-1981), a young man with an artificial leg who attempted to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research... [more]
TIBBY   f & m   English
Diminutive of TABITHA or THEOBALD.
TIERNEY   m & f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
TOBY   m & f   English
Medieval form of TOBIAS. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
TOMMIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of THOMAS, sometimes used as a feminine form.
TRACEY   f & m   English
Variant of TRACY.
TRACY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman French place name meaning "domain belonging to THRACIUS". Charles Dickens used it for a male character in his novel 'The Pickwick Papers' (1837)... [more]
TRISTEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of TRISTAN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
TRISTIN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of TRISTAN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
VAL   m & f   English
Short form of VALENTINE (1), VALERIE, and other names beginning with Val.
VIC   m & f   English
Short form of VICTOR or VICTORIA.
VIVIAN   m & f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century... [more]
WALLIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne.
WHITNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIL   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILLIE   m & f   English
Masculine or feminine diminutive of WILLIAM. A notable bearer is the retired American baseball player Willie Mays (1931-).
WILLY   m & f   English, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WISDOM   f & m   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word, a derivative of Old English wis "wise".
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