Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keywords war or battle or army.
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ÆLFWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
AGRONA   f   Celtic Mythology
Derived from the old Celtic element agro meaning "battle, slaughter". This was the name of the Brythonic goddess of war and death.
ALDEGUND   f   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and gund "war". Saint Algegund (or Aldegundis) was a 7th-century Frankish abbess.
ALFHER   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements alf "elf" and hari "army, warrior" (making it a cognate of ALVAR).
ALFHILD   f   Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Norse legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to king Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
ALFONSO   m   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of a Visigothic Germanic name, probably meaning "noble and ready", from the element adal "noble" combined with funs "ready". Other theories claim the first element is hadu or hild (see ILDEFONSO), both of which mean "battle". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. This was the name of six kings of Portugal and kings of several ancient regions of Spain.
ANDROMACHE   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek elements ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος) and μαχη (mache) meaning "battle". In Greek legend she was the wife of the Trojan hero Hector. After the fall of Troy Neoptolemus killed her son Astyanax and took her as a concubine.
ANIK   m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "army" or "splendour" in Sanskrit.
ARISTOMACHE   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from the Greek elements αριστος (aristos) "best" and μαχη (mache) "battle".
AUDHILD   f   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements auðr "wealth, fortune" and hildr "battle".
BADA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name probably derived from beadu meaning "battle".
BÅRD   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Bárðr, which was derived from the elements baðu "battle" and friðr "peace".
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BODIL   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Bóthildr, derived from bót "remedy" and hildr "battle".
BOJAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element boji meaning "battle". This was the name of a 9th-century Bulgarian saint.
BORGHILD   f   Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse elements borg "fortification" and hildr "battle". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Sigmund.
BORISLAV   m   Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element borti "battle" combined with slava "glory".
BOŘIVOJ   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements borti "battle" and voji "soldier". This name was borne by a 9th-century duke of Bohemia.
BORKO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
BORNA   m & f   Croatian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
BOYKO   m   Bulgarian
Originally a diminutive of names containing the Slavic element boji meaning "battle".
BRÜNHILD   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the Valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
CADELL   m   Welsh
From Welsh cad "battle" and a diminutive suffix.
CADEYRN   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CADFAEL   m   Welsh
Means "battle prince" from Welsh cad "battle" and mael "prince".
CADFAN   m   Welsh
Means "battle peak" from Welsh cad "battle" and ban "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
CADOC   m   Welsh
Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CADWALADER   m   Welsh
Means "leader of the battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a Welsh saint of the 7th century.
CADWGAN   m   Welsh
Means "glory in battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwogawn "glory, honour". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, this name is briefly mentioned as the son of Iddon.
CAEDMON   m   History
Meaning unknown, though the first element is likely connected to Brythonic caed meaning "battle". Saint Caedmon was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon poet who supposedly received his poetic inspiration from a dream. Our only knowledge of him is through the historian Bede.
CATHAIR   m   Irish
Means "battle man" from Gaelic cath "battle" and vir "man".
CATHAL   m   Irish
Derived from the Gaelic elements cath "battle" and val "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
CATHÁN   m   Irish
Derived from Gaelic cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CEALLACH   m   Irish
Irish name of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish ceallach "war, strife" or ceall "church".
CENK   m   Turkish
Means "battle, war" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
CHAD   m   English
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHARLES   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CLOTILDE   f   French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
CYNBEL   m   Ancient Celtic
Derived from Welsh cyn "chief" and bel "war".
CZCIBOR   m   Polish
Derived from the Slavic elements chisti "honour" and borti "battle".
DEMOSTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "army of the people", derived from the Greek elements δημος (demos) "the people" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
DIETER   m   German
Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and hari "army".
DUILIO   m   Italian, Spanish
From the Roman name Duilius, which is possibly derived from Latin duellum "war". This was the name of a Roman consul who defeated the Carthaginians in a naval battle.
EADWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
EALHHERE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
ELLANHER   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements aljan "strength, power" and hari "army, warrior".
EOFORHILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ERHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element era "honour, respect" or hari "army" combined with hard "brave, hardy". In some cases it may be a variant of EBERHARD.
ERWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrodinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
GERHILD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
GONZALO   m   Spanish
From the medieval name Gundisalvus, which was the Latin form of a Germanic name composed of the elements gund "war" and salv which is of unknown meaning.
GRISELDA   f   English, Scottish, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GUIOMAR   f & m   Portuguese, Spanish, Arthurian Romance
Possibly derived from the Germanic name Wigmar, which is formed of the elements wig "war, battle" and meri "famous". In the medieval 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle he plays a minor role as a cousin of Guinevere, who banishes him after he becomes a lover of Morgan le Fey. In modern Portugal and Spain it is a feminine name.
GUNBORG   f   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Gunnbjörg, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and björg "help, save, rescue".
GUNDA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNHILD   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
GUNNAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of GÜNTHER). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
GUNNE   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element gunnr "war".
GUNNR   f   Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gunnr meaning "war". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
GÜNTHER   m   German, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
GUNTRAM   m   German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
GUNVOR   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvör meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vor "vigilant, cautious".
HADUFUNS   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and funs "ready".
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HARTWIG   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
HARVEY   m   English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HEDWIG   f   German
From the Germanic name Hadewig, derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and wig "war". This was the name of a 13th-century German saint, the wife of the Polish duke Henry the Bearded. It was subsequently borne by a 14th-century Polish queen (usually known by her Polish name Jadwiga) who is now also regarded as a saint.
HEDY   f   German, Dutch
Diminutive of HEDWIG and other Germanic names beginning with the element hadu meaning "battle, combat".
HEILWIG   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements heil "happy, hearty, healthy" and wig "war".
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HEREWARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HERLEIFR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements herr "army" and leifr "son, descendant".
HERLEVA   f   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, possibly a derivative of hari "army", era "honour", or erla "noble" (or their Old Norse cognates). This was the name of the mother of William the Conqueror, who, according to tradition, was a commoner.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
HIDDE   m   Frisian
Frisian short form of names containing the Germanic element hild meaning "battle".
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDEBERT   m   German
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
HILDEBRAND   m   German (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
HILDEGARD   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HILTRAUD   f   German
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
ILDEFONSO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of the Visigothic name Hildefons, which meant "battle ready", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and funs "ready". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, an archbishop of Toledo.
INGVILD   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Yngvildr, derived from the name of the Norse god YNGVI combined with hildr "battle".
IRMHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and hild "battle".
ISOLDE   f   English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".... [more]
JUN   m & f   Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (jūn) meaning "king, ruler", (jùn) meaning "talented, handsome" (which is usually only masculine) or (jūn) meaning "army" (also usually only masculine). This is also a single-character Korean name, often from the hanja meaning "talented, handsome". This name can be formed by other characters besides those shown here.
JUNAYD   m   Arabic
Means "small army", derived from Arabic جند (jund) "army, soldiers".
KALLISTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "beautiful army" from the Greek elements καλλος (kallos) "beauty" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
KRIEMHILD   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
KUNIGUNDE   f   German
Derived from the Germanic element kuni "clan, family" combined with gund "war". Saint Kunigunde was the wife of Holy Roman Emperor Henry II.
LEUTHAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements leud "people" and hari "army".
LOTHAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
LUDWIG   m   German
From the Germanic name Chlodovech, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman Emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
LYSIMACHUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυσιμαχος (Lysimachos), derived from λυσις (lysis) "a release, loosening" and μαχη (mache) "battle". This was the name of one of the generals under Alexander the Great. After Alexander's death Lysimachus took control of Thrace.
LYSISTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Derived from λυσις (lysis) "a release, loosening" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
MAGNHILD   f   Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse magn "mighty, strong" and hildr "battle". This was the name of a novel by the Norwegian author Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson.
MATILDA   f   English, Swedish, Finnish
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.... [more]
MILDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements milde "gentle" and gyð "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the sister of Saint Mildred.
NEOPTOLEMUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νεοπτολεμος (Neoptolemos) meaning "new war", derived from νεος (neos) "new" and πολεμος (polemos) "war". In Greek legend this was the name of the son of Achilles, brought into the Trojan War because it was prophesied the Greeks could not win it unless he was present. After the war he was slain by Orestes fighting over Hermione.
NIKOMACHOS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "battle of victory" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and μαχη (mache) "battle".
NIKOSTRATOS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "army of victory" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and στρατος (stratos) "army". This was the name of a Roman saint martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian.
PRASENJIT   m   Bengali
Means "conqueror of an expert army" in Sanskrit.
PREBEN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Modern Danish form of the name Pridbjørn, which was a medieval Scandinavian form of the Slavic (Wendish) name Pridbor, which was derived from Slavic prid "first" and borti "battle". It was imported into Danish via the medieval Putbus family, who were Slavic nobles from Rügen in Pomerania.
QUÂN   m   Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (quân) meaning "army".
RAGNHILD   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ragnhildr, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and hildr "battle".
RATIMIR   m   Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rati meaning "war, battle" and miru meaning "peace, world".
RATKO   m   Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element rati meaning "war, battle".
RAYNER   m   English (Archaic)
From the Germanic name Raganhar, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hari "army". The Normans brought this name to England where it came into general use, though it was rare by the end of the Middle Ages.
REINHILD   f   German
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hild "battle".
ROMILDA   f & m   Italian, Ancient Germanic
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
SAVAŞ   m   Turkish
Means "war" in Turkish.
SIEGER   m   Dutch, German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hari "army".
SIEGHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hild "battle".
SOSTRATE   f   Ancient Greek
Means "safe army" from Greek σως (sos) "safe, whole, unwounded" and στρατος (stratos) "army".
STRATON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek στρατος (stratos) meaning "army". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek philosopher.
SVYATOPOLK   m   Russian
Means "blessed people" from the Slavic elements svetu "blessed, holy" and pulku "people, host, army".
SWANHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
TAISTO   m   Finnish
Means "battle" in Finnish.
TORHILD   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórhildr, which meant "Thor's battle" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with hildr "battle".
VELIBOR   m   Serbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic elements veli "great" and borti "battle".
VÍGDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements víg "war" and dís "goddess".
VIGGO   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".
VOLKER   m   German
Derived from the Germanic element fulc "people" combined with hari "army".
WALTER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WERNER   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army".
WERTHER   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements wert "worthy" and hari "army". Goethe used this name in his novel 'The Sorrows of Young Werther' (1774).
WIEBE   m   Frisian, Dutch, German
Medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element wig meaning "war".
WIGAND   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element wig meaning "war".
WIGBRAND   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and brand "sword".
WIGBURG   f   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and burg "fortress".
WYBERT   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
WYMOND   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
WYOT   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigheard, composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
WYSTAN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
YUDA   m   Indonesian
Means "war" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit युद्ध (yuddha).
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