Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the usage is norse.
gender
usage
Ægir m Norse Mythology
Means "sea, ocean" in Old Norse. According to Norse mythology Ægir was a god or giant (jǫtunn) who lived under the ocean. His wife was Rán.
Aghi m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ove.
Agmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Amund.
Agnarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Agnar.
Áki m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse diminutive of names containing the element anu "ancestor".
Áleifr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Olaf.
Alf 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse alfr meaning "elf". In Norse legend this was the name of king, the suitor of a reluctant maiden named Alfhild. She avoided marrying him by disguising herself as a warrior, but when they fought she was so impressed by his strength that she changed her mind.
Alfarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Alvar.
Alfhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Alfhild.
Alfr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Alf 1.
Alfríkr m Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and ríkr "ruler, king" (making it a cognate of Alberich).
Alfvin m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and vinr "friend". It is a cognate of Ælfwine.
Algautr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements alfr meaning "elf" and gautr meaning "Geat" (a North Germanic tribe).
Álǫf f Old Norse
Feminine form of Áleifr.
Alvis m Norse Mythology, Latvian
From the Old Norse Alvíss meaning "all wise". In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf who was to marry Thor's daughter Thrud. Thor was not pleased with this so he tricked Alvis by asking him questions until the sun rose, at which time the dwarf was turned into stone.
Alvíss m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Alvis.
Angrboða f Norse Mythology
Means "she who brings grief" in Old Norse, derived from angr "grief" and boða "to forebode, to proclaim". According to Norse mythology Angrboða was a giantess (jǫtunn) and the mother of three of Loki's children: Fenrir, Jörmungandr and Hel.
Anundr m Old Norse
Possibly from the Old Norse elements *anu "ancestor" and *vindr "victor".
Ari 2 m Old Norse, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
Arnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements ǫrn meaning "eagle" and bjǫrg meaning "help, save, rescue".
Arnfinnr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Arnfinn.
Árni m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Arne 1.
Arnsteinn m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse ǫrn meaning "eagle" and steinn meaning "stone".
Arnþórr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Andor 1.
Arnviðr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Arvid.
Ása f Old Norse, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse, Icelandic and Faroese form of Åsa.
Ásbjǫrn m Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and bjǫrn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of Osborn.
Ásdís f Icelandic, Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and dís "goddess".
Ásgeirr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Asger.
Áshildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åshild.
Ask m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse askr "ash tree". In Norse mythology Ask and his wife Embla were the first humans created by the gods.
Ásketill m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse áss "god" and ketill "cauldron, helmet".
Askr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Ask.
Áslaug f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Aslaug.
Ásmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åsmund.
Ásný f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åsne.
Ásta f Old Norse, Icelandic
Short form of Ástríðr. It nearly coincides with Icelandic ást meaning "love".
Ástríðr f Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and fríðr "beautiful, beloved".
Ásvaldr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements áss "god" and valdr "ruler" (a cognate of Oswald).
Aðalsteinn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements aðal "noble" and steinn "stone".
Atli m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Attila, used in the Norse Völsungasaga to refer to a fictional version of Attila the Hun.
Auðr f & m Old Norse
Means "wealth, fortune" in Old Norse.
Auðrhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Audhild.
Auðun m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse auðr "wealth, fortune" and vinr "friend".
Baggi m Old Norse
Byname derived from Old Norse baggi meaning "bag, pack".
Balder m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Baldr meaning "hero, lord, prince", derived from baldr meaning "brave, bold". In Norse mythology Balder was the handsome son of Odin and Frigg. Because of the disturbing dreams he had when he was young, his mother extracted an oath from every thing in the world that it would not harm him. However the devious god Loki learned that she had overlooked mistletoe. Being jealous, he tricked the blind god Hoder into throwing a branch of mistletoe at Balder, which killed him.
Baldr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Balder.
Bárðr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bård.
Bergljót f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Bergljot.
Birgir m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Birger.
Bjarni m Old Norse, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse diminutive of Bjǫrn and other names containing the element bjǫrn meaning "bear".
Bjartr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bjarte.
Bjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bjørg.
Bjǫrn m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Björn.
Borghild f Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse elements borg "fortress" and hildr "battle". In the Norse Völsungasaga she is the wife of Sigmund.
Bóthildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bodil.
Brage m Norse Mythology, Norwegian
Modern Scandinavian form of Bragi.
Bragi m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse bragr meaning "first, foremost" or "poetry". In Norse mythology Bragi is the god of poetry and the husband of Iðunn.
Brandr m Old Norse
Old Norse byname meaning "fire, torch, sword".
Brokkr m Norse Mythology
Means "badger" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf, the brother and assistant of Sindri.
Bróðir m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bror.
Brynhildr f Norse Mythology, Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Brunhild. In the Norse epic the Völsungasaga Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
Brynja f Icelandic, Old Norse
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
Brynjarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Brynjar.
Búi m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Bo 1.
Dagfinnr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Dagfinn.
Dagmær f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Dagmar.
Dagný f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Dagny.
Dagr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Dag.
Dagrún f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Dagrun.
Danr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Dan 3.
Edda 2 f Icelandic, Old Norse
Possibly from Old Norse meaning "great-grandmother". This was the name of two 13th-century Icelandic literary works: the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. This is also the name of a character in the Poetic Edda, though it is unclear if her name is connected to the name of the collection.
Egill m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Egil.
Eileifr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Elof.
Einarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Einar.
Eindriði m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Eindride.
Eir f Norse Mythology, Icelandic (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Means "mercy" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse goddess of healing and medicine.
Eiríkr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Eric.
Elli 3 f Norse Mythology
Means "old age" in Old Norse. In the Prose Edda this is the name of an old woman (old age personified) who wrestles with and defeats the god Thor.
Embla f Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Old Norse almr "elm". In Norse mythology Embla and her husband Ask were the first humans. They were created by three of the gods from two trees.
Erlendr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Erland.
Erlingr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Erling.
Erna 2 f Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means "brisk, vigorous, hale" in Old Norse. This was the name of the wife of Jarl in Norse legend.
Eydís f Old Norse, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
Eysteinn m Old Norse, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and steinn meaning "stone".
Eyvindr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Øyvind.
Eyvǫr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Eivor.
Fastúlfr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements fastr "firm, solid" and ulfr "wolf".
Félagi m Old Norse
Means "fellow, partner" in Old Norse.
Fenrir m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse fen meaning "marsh, fen". In Norse mythology Fenrir was a ferocious wolf, one of the offspring of Loki and the giantess Angrboða. Because it was foretold he would bring about disaster, the gods bound him with a magical fetter, though in the process Tyr's hand was bitten off. At the time of Ragnarök, the end of the world, it is told that he will break free and kill Odin.
Finnr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Finn 2.
Flæmingr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Flemming.
Fólki m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Folke.
Freya f Norse Mythology, English (Modern), German
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of a goddess associated with love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claims half of the heroes who are slain in battle and brings them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she is one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.... [more]
Freyja f Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Icelandic and Old Norse form of Freya.
Freyr m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "lord" in Old Norse, derived from the Germanic root *fraujô. This is the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr is associated with fertility, sunlight and rain, and is the husband of the giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he is one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
Frigg f Norse Mythology
Means "beloved", from Proto-Germanic *Frijjō, derived from the root *frijōną meaning "to love". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Odin and the mother of Balder. Some scholars believe that she and the goddess Freya share a common origin (though their names are not linguistically related).
Fríða f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Frida 2.
Friðþjófr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Fritjof.
Fróði m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Frode.
Gandalf m Norse Mythology, Literature
Means "wand elf" in Old Norse, from the elements gandr "wand, staff, magic, monster" and alfr "elf". This name belongs to a dwarf (Gandálfr) in the Völuspá, a 13th-century Scandinavian manuscript that forms part of the Poetic Edda. The author J. R. R. Tolkien borrowed the name for a wizard in his novels The Hobbit (1937) and The Lord of the Rings (1954).
Gandálfr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Gandalf.
Gauti m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Göte.
Gautstafr m Old Norse
Old Norse form (possibly) of Gustav. This form is only attested in the Old Norse period belonging to a horse.
Gefjon f Norse Mythology
Probably means "the giving one", from Old Norse gefa "to give". Gefjon or Gefion was a Norse goddess associated with ploughing and fertility.
Geirmundr m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse geirr "spear" and mundr "protection".
Geirr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Geir.
Gerd 2 f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Gerðr, derived from garðr meaning "enclosure, yard". In Norse myth Gerd is a beautiful giantess (jǫtunn). Freyr falls in love with her, and has his servant Skírnir convince her to marry him.
Gerðr f Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Gerd 2.
Grid f Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Gríðr, probably derived from either gríð "zeal, vehemence" or grið "peace". In Norse myth she was a giantess (jǫtunn), the mother of Vidar by Odin. She aided Thor in his fight against the giant Geirrod.
Grímhildr f Norse Mythology, Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Kriemhild. In the Norse Völsungasaga Grímhildr is the mother of Gunnar and Gudrun, while in the German counterpart the Nibelungenlied Kriemhild is the sister of Gunther and she herself has a role equivalent to Gudrun.
Gríðr f Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Grid.
Gróa f Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse gróa meaning "to grow". This is the name of a seeress in Norse mythology.
Gudrun f Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore, rune". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him. Her story appears in Norse literature such as the Eddas and the Völsungasaga. She is called Kriemhild in German versions of the tale. This is also an unrelated character in the medieval German epic Kudrun.
Gulbrandr m Old Norse
Old Norse variant of Guðbrandr.
Gulla f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gull.
Gunna f Danish, Old Norse
Feminine form of Gunne.
Gunnar m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr, which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and herr "army, warrior" (making it a cognate of Gunther). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
Gunnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunborg.
Gunnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunhild.
Gunni m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunne.
Gunnr f Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gunnr meaning "war". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Gunnvaldr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunvald.
Gunnvǫr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunvor.
Guðbrandr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gudbrand.
Guðfrøðr m Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Godefrid, or perhaps a borrowing of the continental Germanic form.
Guðini m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Godwine.
Guðlaug f Old Norse, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements guð meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "vowed, promised, bound in oath".
Guðleif f Old Norse
Feminine form of Guðleifr.
Guðleifr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gleb.
Guðmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gudmund.
Guðríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements guð "god" and fríðr "beautiful, beloved".
Guðrún f Old Norse, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Gudrun, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Gyða f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Gytha.
Hákon m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Håkon, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Hálfdan m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Halfdan.
Hallbjǫrg f Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements hallr "rock" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Hallbjǫrn m Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements hallr "rock" and bjǫrn "bear".
Halli m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Halle 1.
Hallr m Old Norse
Derived from Old Norse hallr meaning "rock".
Hallsteinn m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Hallstein.
Hallþóra f Old Norse
Feminine form of Hallþórr.
Hallþórr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Haldor.
Hallvarðr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Halvard.
Hámundr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse element hár "high" or hǫð "battle, combat" combined with mundr "protection".
Haraldr m Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Harold.
Hávarðr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse element hár "high" or hǫð "battle, combat" combined with vǫrðr "guard, guardian".
Heidrun f Norse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret lore, rune". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
Heimdall m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Heimdallr, derived from Old Norse heimr "home, house" and dallr, possibly meaning "glowing, shining". In Norse mythology he is the god who guards the Bifröst, the bridge that connects Asgard to the other worlds. It is foretold that he will blow the Gjallarhorn to wake the gods for the final battle at the end of the world, Ragnarök. During this battle, he will fight Loki and they will slay one another.
Heimdallr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Heimdall.
Heimir m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
From Old Norse heimr meaning "home" (a cognate of Hama). In the Völsungasaga he is a king of Hlymdalir.
Heiðrún f Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Heidrun.
Hel f Norse Mythology
In Norse mythology this was the name of the daughter of Loki. She got her name from the underworld, also called Hel, where she ruled, which meant "to conceal, to cover" in Old Norse (related to the English word hell).
Helgi m Icelandic, Old Norse
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Helge.
Hemingr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Hemming.
Herleif f & m Old Norse, Norwegian (Rare)
Old Norse feminine form and modern Scandinavian masculine form of Herleifr.
Herleifr m Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements herr "army, warrior" and leif "inheritance, legacy".
Hildigunnr f Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements hildr "battle" and gunnr "battle, war". It is a cognate of Hildegund.
Hildingr m Old Norse, Norse Mythology
Means "chief, warrior", a derivative of Old Norse hildr "battle". This is the name of a character in the Norse tale Frithiof's Saga.
Hildr f Old Norse, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse hildr meaning "battle", making it a cognate of Hilda. In Norse legend this was the name of a valkyrie.
Hjálmarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Hjalmar.
Hjǫrdís f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Hjördis.
Hlíf f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Liv 1.
Hoder m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Hǫðr, derived from hǫð meaning "battle". In Norse mythology he was a blind god, tricked by Loki into killing his brother Balder.
Hólmfríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements holmr "small island" and fríðr "beautiful, beloved".
Hólmgeirr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Holger.
Hǫðr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Hoder.
Hrafn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
Hrafnhildr f Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements hrafn "raven" and hildr "battle".
Hreiðarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Reidar.
Hreiðunn f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Reidun.
Hróaldr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Roald.
Hróarr m Old Norse
Old Norse name, derived from the element hróðr "praise, fame" combined with either geirr "spear" (making it a relation of Hróðgeirr), herr "army, warrior" or varr "aware, cautious". This is the name of a legendary Danish king, the same one who is featured in the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf with the name Hroðgar.
Hrœrekr m Old Norse
Old West Norse form of Hrǿríkr.
Hrólfr m Old Norse
Contracted form of Hróðulfr.
Hrǫnn f Norse Mythology
Means "wave" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology she was one of the nine daughters of Ægir and Rán.
Hrǿríkr m Old Norse (Hypothetical)
From Old Norse hróðr "praise, fame, glory" and ríkr "ruler, king" (a cognate of Roderick).
Hróðgeirr m Old Norse
From Old Norse hróðr "praise, fame" and geirr "spear", making it a cognate of Hrodger (see Roger).
Hróðulfr m Old Norse
From Old Norse hróðr "praise, fame" and ulfr "wolf", making it an Old Norse cognate of Hrodulf (see Rudolf).
Hróðvaldr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Roald.
Hugleikr m Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from hugr "mind, thought, mood" and leikr "play".
Huld f Norse Mythology
Old Norse variant of Hulda 1.
Hulda 1 f Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "gracious, sweet, lovable".
Idun f Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian
Modern Scandinavian form of Iðunn.
Idunn f Norse Mythology, Norwegian
Norwegian variant form of Iðunn.
Ingi m Icelandic, Old Norse
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Inge.
Ingibjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingeborg.
Ingigerðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingegerd.
Ingimárr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingemar.
Ingólfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingolf.
Ingríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingrid.
Ingunn f Norwegian, Icelandic, Old Norse
From the name of the Germanic god Ing combined with Old Norse unna meaning "to love".
Iðunn f Norse Mythology, Old Norse, Icelandic
Probably derived from the Old Norse prefix ið- "again, repeated" and unna "to love". In Norse mythology Iðunn was the goddess of spring and immortality whose responsibility it was to guard the gods' apples of youth.
Ívarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ivor.
Jarl m Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Norse Mythology, Old Norse
Means "chieftain, nobleman" in Old Norse (a cognate of the English word earl). In the Norse poem Rígsþula Jarl is the son of the god Ríg and the founder of the race of warriors.
Jóarr m Old Norse
From Old Norse jór "horse" and herr "army, warrior". This name appears on runestones as ioar and iuar, though the latter form could also represent Ívarr.
Jörmungandr m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Jǫrmungandr, derived from jǫrmun "great, immense" and gandr "monster, magic, wand". In Norse mythology Jörmungandr was an enormous sea serpent, also known as the World Serpent because he was said to encircle the world. He was one of the offspring of Loki and Angrboða. During Ragnarök, the battle at end of the world, it is said that he will fight his old enemy Thor and both of them will die.
Jórunnr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Jorunn.
Jósteinn m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Jostein.
Kálfr m Old Norse
Means "calf" in Old Norse.
Kára f Norse Mythology
Probably from Old Norse kárr meaning "curly, curved". In Norse legend this was the name of a valkyrie.
Kári m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Kåre.
Karl m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, English, Finnish, Estonian, Germanic, Old Norse
German and Scandinavian form of Charles. This was the name of seven rulers of the Franks and the Holy Roman Empire. It was also borne by a beatified emperor of Austria (1887-1922), as well as ten kings of Sweden. Other famous bearers include the German philosophers Karl Marx (1818-1883), one of the developers of communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), an existentialist and psychiatrist.
Katla f Icelandic, Old Norse
Feminine form of Ketil.
Ketill m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ketil.
Ketillaug f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Kjellaug.
Ketilríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Kjellfrid.
Knútr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Knut.
Kóri m Old Norse
Old Norse name of unknown meaning.
Leifr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Leif.
Loke m Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of Loki.
Loki m Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from the Germanic root *luką meaning "lock". In Norse mythology Loki was a trickster god associated with magic and shape shifting. Loki's children include the wolf Fenrir, the sea serpent Jörmungandr, and the queen of the dead Hel. After he orchestrated the death of Balder, the other gods tied him to a rock below a snake that dripped venom onto his face. It is told that he will break free during Ragnarök, the final battle, and slay and be slain by Heimdall.
Magnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Magnhild.
Magni m Old Norse, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse element magn meaning "power, strength". In Norse mythology this name is borne by a son of Thor and the giant Járnsaxa.
Málmfríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Målfrid.
Mundi m Old Norse
Short form of Old Norse names ending with the element mundr "protection".
Myrgjǫl f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Muirgel.
Nanna 1 f Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Norse nanþ meaning "daring, brave". In Norse mythology she was a goddess who died of grief when her husband Balder was killed.
Njáll m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Niall (see Neil). This is the name of the hero of a 13th century Icelandic saga, based on the life of a 10th-century Icelandic chieftain.
Njord m Norse Mythology, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare)
From Old Norse Njǫrðr, derived from Proto-Germanic *Nerþuz. It might derive from the Indo-European root *hnerto- meaning "strong, vigorous". Njord was the Norse god associated with the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir gods.
Njǫrðr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Njord.
Oddbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Oddbjørg.
Oddbjǫrn m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Oddbjørn.
Oddný f Old Norse, Icelandic
From Old Norse oddr "point of a sword" and nýr "new".
Oddr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Odd.
Oddrún f Old Norse, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse oddr "point of a sword" and rún "secret lore, rune". This is the name of a woman in the Old Norse poem Oddrúnargrátr in the Poetic Edda.
Oddvarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Oddvar.
Oden m Norse Mythology
Swedish form of Odin.
Odin m Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr meaning "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from Proto-Germanic *Wōdanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wuotan, Wotan or Wodan in continental Europe, though he is best known from Norse sources.... [more]
Ólaug f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Olaug.
Ǫlvir m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Olve.
Ǫrvar m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Orvar.
Orvar m Swedish (Rare), Norse Mythology
Means "arrow" in Old Norse. Orvar Odd is a legendary Norse hero who is the subject of a 13th-century Icelandic saga.
Óðinn m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Odin.
Óttarr m Old Norse, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse ótti "terror, fear" and herr "army, warrior". In the Old Norse poem Hyndluljóð in the Poetic Edda, the goddess Freya helps Óttar learn about his ancestry.
Ragna f Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Old Norse
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element regin "advice, counsel".
Ragnarr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements regin "advice, counsel" and herr "army, warrior". It is a cognate of Rayner.
Ragnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Ragnfríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Randi 2.
Ragnheiðr f Old Norse
Old Norse name meaning "bright advice", derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and heiðr "bright, clear".
Ragnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ragnhild.
Ragnvaldr m Old Norse
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "ruler" (making it a cognate of Reynold).
Rán f Norse Mythology
Means "robbery, theft" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology Rán was a sea goddess who captured and drowned sailors. She was wife to Ægir and the mother of nine daughters by him.
Randúlfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Randolf.
Ráðúlfr m Old Norse
Derived from the Norse elements ráð meaning "counsel, advice" and ulfr meaning "wolf".
Rúna f Old Norse, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse, Icelandic and Faroese feminine form of Rune.
Rúni m Old Norse, Faroese
Old Norse and Faroese form of Rune.
Sága f Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Saga.
Saga f Norse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
From Old Norse Sága, possibly meaning "seeing one", derived from sjá "to see". This is the name of a Norse goddess, possibly connected to Frigg. As a Swedish and Icelandic name, it is also derived from the unrelated word saga "story, fairy tale, saga".
Salbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Solbjørg.
Saldís f Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements salr "room, hall" and dís "goddess".
Sif f Norse Mythology, Danish, Icelandic
Old Norse, Danish and Icelandic form of Siv.
Sigfrøðr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and friðr "peace, love". It is a cognate of Siegfried.
Sigmund m German, Norwegian, English, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old German elements sigu "victory" and munt "protection" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from Old Norse sigr and mundr). An early variant of this name was Sigismund, borne by a 6th-century saint and king of the Burgundians. In the Norse Völsungasaga Sigmund is the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
Signý f Old Norse, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name that was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and nýr "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
Sigríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Sigrid.
Sigrún f Old Norse, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret lore, rune". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Sigsteinn m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Sixten.
Sigurd m Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and vǫrðr "guard, guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse epic the Völsungasaga, which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
Sindri m Norse Mythology, Old Norse, Icelandic
Means "sparkle" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf, also named Eitri. With his brother Brokkr he made several magical items for the gods, including Odin's ring Draupnir and Thor's hammer Mjölnir.
Siv f Swedish, Norwegian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Sif, which meant "bride, kinswoman". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Thor. After the trickster Loki cut off her golden hair, an angry Thor forced him to create a replacement.
Skaði f Norse Mythology
Means "damage, harm" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology she was a giantess (jǫtunn) associated with the winter, skiing and mountains. After the gods killed her father, they offered her a husband from among them as compensation. She ended up marrying Njord.
Skuld f Norse Mythology
Means "debt, obligation" in Old Norse. She was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny, in Norse mythology. She was also one of the valkyries.
Snorri m Old Norse, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
Sólveig f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Solveig.
Somerled m Old Norse (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Sumarliði meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Norse-Gaelic king of Mann and the Scottish Isles.
Stáli m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ståle.
Steinarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Steinar.
Steingrímr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Steingrímur.
Steinn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Sten.
Steinunn f Icelandic, Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements steinn "stone" and unnr "wave".
Stígandr m Old Norse
Means "wanderer" in Old Norse.
Stigr m Old Norse
Means "path" in Old Norse.
Sumarliði m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Somerled.
Sundri m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Sondre.
Suni m Old Norse
From Old Norse sunr meaning "son".
Svanhild f Norwegian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse svanr "swan" and hildr "battle", a Scandinavian cognate of Swanhild. In the Norse epic the Völsungasaga she is the daughter of Sigurd and Gudrun.
Svantepolk m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Svatopluk. It was borne by the prominent 13th-century Swedish nobleman Svantepolk Knutsson. He may have been named after a relative of his Pomeranian mother.
Sveinn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Sven.
Sverrir m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Sverre, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Þone f Old Norse
Variant of Þórný.
Thor m Norse Mythology, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from Proto-Germanic *Þunraz. In Norse mythology Thor is a god of storms, thunder, war and strength, a son of Odin. He is portrayed as red-bearded, short-tempered, armed with a powerful hammer called Mjölnir, and wearing an enchanted belt called Megingjörð that doubles his strength. During Ragnarök, the final battle at the end of the world, it is foretold that Thor will slay the monstrous sea serpent Jörmungandr but be fatally poisoned by its venom.
Þóra f Old Norse, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see Thor) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
Þórarinn m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with ǫrn "eagle".