PurpleKorat's Personal Name List

ABSALOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אַבְשָׁלוֹם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-sə-ləm(English)
From the Hebrew name אַבְשָׁלוֹם ('Avshalom) meaning "my father is peace", derived from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". In the Old Testament he is a son of King David. He avenged his sister Tamar by arranging the murder of her rapist, their half-brother Amnon. He later led a revolt against his father. While fleeing on the back of a mule he got his head caught in a tree and was killed by Joab.
ADHARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.
AKIVA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲקִיבָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-KEE-vah
From an Aramaic form of YAAKOV. Akiva (or Akiba) ben Joseph was a prominent 1st-century Jewish rabbi.
ANAT (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Possibly derived from a Semitic root meaning "water spring". Anat was a goddess of fertility, hunting and war worshipped by the Semitic peoples of the Levant. She was the sister and consort of the god Hadad.
ANDREV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton
Breton form of ANDRÉ.
ANEMONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-NEHM-ə-nee
From the name of the anemone flower, which is derived from Greek ἄνεμος (anemos) meaning "wind".
ANZHELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Анжела(Russian, Ukrainian)
Russian and Ukrainian form of ANGELA.
APOLLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-PAW-LEEN
French form of APOLLONIA.
ASHERAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Perhaps derived from Semitic roots meaning "she who walks in the sea". This was the name of a Semitic mother goddess. She was worshipped by the Israelites before the advent of monotheism.
ASHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשִׁירָה, עֲשִׁירָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-shee-rah
Means "I will sing", directly from the Hebrew word in the Old Testament.
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Means "rich" in Hebrew.
ASTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-trə
Means "star", ultimately from Greek ἀστήρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
ASYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ася(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: A-syə(Russian)
Diminutive of ANASTASIYA or ALEKSANDRA.
ATARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲטָרָה(Hebrew)
Alternate transcription of Hebrew עֲטָרָה (see ATARAH).
AYAME
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 菖蒲, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-YA-MEH
From Japanese 菖蒲 (ayame) meaning "iris (flower)". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
AZENOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton, Breton Legend, Theatre
Pronounced: ah-ZAY-nor(Breton)
Breton name of uncertain origin and meaning.
It is sometimes linked to Breton enor "honor", a theory which goes back to the fact that Saint Azénore is occasionally rendered as HONORA in Latin texts. Another theory, however, links this name to ELEANOR (via AENOR, which is occasionally considered a contracted form of AZENOR. Compare also AANOR), while yet another theory was put forth that Azenor might in fact represent an unknown Celtic name, possibly one containing the theonym Esus.

In Breton legend it is borne by the mother of Saint Budoc, a 6th-century princess of Brest (however, the name Eleanor was not coined until the 12th century). It was used for a character in Paul Le Flem's opera Le Rossignol de Saint-Malo (1938) and also occurred briefly in the French TV series Kaamelott (as Azénor).

AZILIZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Pronounced: ah-ZEE-leez
Breton form of CECILIA.
BAHAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Turkish
Other Scripts: بهار(Persian)
Pronounced: ba-HAR(Turkish)
Means "spring" in Persian and Turkish.
BELÉN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: beh-LEHN
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is from Hebrew בֵּית־לֶחֶם (Beit-lechem) meaning "house of bread".
CASSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAS-ee
Variant of CASSIE and diminutive of DORCAS.
CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-ən-deen, SEHL-ən-dien
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
CHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χλόη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLO-ee(English)
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CLOVER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLO-vər
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, French
Pronounced: KAW-RAHN-TEHN(French)
Possibly means "hurricane" in Breton. This was the name of a 5th-century bishop of Quimper in Brittany.
COSMAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κοσμᾶς(Ancient Greek)
From the Greek name Κοσμᾶς (Kosmas), which was derived from κόσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
DAFNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: דַּפְנָה(Hebrew)
Means "laurel" in Hebrew, of Greek origin.
DANIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Bosnian form of DEÏANIRA.
DARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Polish, Romanian, English, Croatian, Russian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Дарья(Russian) Δαρεία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-rya(Italian, Polish) DAR-ya(Romanian) DAHR-ee-ə(English) DAR-ee-ə(English)
Feminine form of DARIUS. Saint Daria was a 3rd-century Greek woman who was martyred with her husband Chrysanthus under the Roman emperor Numerian. It has never been a particularly common English given name. As a Russian name, it is more commonly transcribed Darya.
DARIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Дарія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: DAH-ree-yah
Ukrainian form of DARIA.
DIELLZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Derived from Albanian diell meaning "sun" (compare DIELL).
DIHYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Berber, Northern African, History
Other Scripts: ⴷⵉⵀⵢⴰ(Berber Tifinagh)
Meaning unknown. This was the real name of KAHINA, an Amazigh warrior queen who resisted Arab expansion into North Africa (d. 700 AD).
DRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Diminutive of ADRIANA or ALEXANDRINA.
DUMISANI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu, Ndebele
Means "praise" in Zulu and Ndebele.
DUSK
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare), English (Australian, Rare)
From the English word, ultimately from the Old English dox "dark, swarthy".
EARTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: UR-thə
Combination of the English word earth with the feminine name suffix a. It has been used in honour of African-American philanthropist Eartha M. M. White (1876-1974). Another famous bearer was American singer and actress Eartha Kitt (1927-2008).
EEVI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian
Pronounced: EH-vee(Finnish)
Finnish and Estonian form of EVA.
EGLANTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHG-lən-tien, EHG-lən-teen
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It is derived via Old French from Vulgar Latin *aquilentum meaning "prickly". It was early used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story The Prioress's Tale.
EINAV
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֵנָב, עינב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ei-nav
Variant transcription of ENAV.
ELISHEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִישֶׁבַע(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of ELIZABETH.
ELOWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Variant of ELOWEN.
ELVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-vee
Diminutive of ELVIRA, ELVINA, Elva, and other names beginning with Elv.
ELVIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Russian
Other Scripts: Эльвира(Russian)
Pronounced: ehl-BEE-ra(Spanish) ehl-VEE-ra(Italian)
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera Don Giovanni (1787).
ERROL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHR-əl
From a surname that was originally derived from a Scottish place name. It was popularized as a given name by the Australian actor Errol Flynn (1909-1959).
ESELD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Cornish form of ISOLDE.
ETNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EE-vee, EHV-ee
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
FALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pronounced: fə-LEEN(English) fah-LEE-nə(German)
Used by Disney and Austrian author Felix Salten for a female roe deer in his novel 'Bambi' (1923).
FORREST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWR-ist
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie Forrest Gump (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.
FOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FAHKS
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
GALENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Галена(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian and Macedonian feminine form of Galenos (see GALEN).
GALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: גַּלְיָה(Hebrew)
Elaboration of GAL (1). It could also be considered a compound meaning "wave from God", using the element יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God.
GAVRAIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Гавраил(Bulgarian)
Bulgarian form of GABRIEL.
GHISLAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHEES-LEHN, GEE-LEHN
Feminine form of GHISLAIN.
HALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: هالة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HA-lah
Means "halo around the moon" in Arabic. This was the name of a sister-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad.
HALLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAL-ee
Diminutive of HARRIET.
HAVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: חַוָּה(Hebrew)
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַוָּה (see CHAVA).
HERVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Feminine form of HERVÉ.
HILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: הִילָה(Hebrew)
Means "halo, aura" in Hebrew, from the root הָלַל (halal) meaning "to praise, to shine".
ILARION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Иларион(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of HILARION.
INEZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-NEHZ, ee-NEHZ, ie-NEHZ
English form of INÉS.
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ee-SOW-ra(Spanish)
Late Latin name meaning "from Isauria". Isauria was the name of a region in Asia Minor.
ISKRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Искра(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
From a South Slavic word meaning "spark".
IVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
IZAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-SAR
Means "star" in Basque.
IZET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bosnian, Albanian
Pronounced: EE-zet(Bosnian)
JANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAY-nee
Diminutive of JANE.
JENOVEFA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton, Czech
Czech variant of JENOVÉFA and Breton form of GENEVIÈVE (via Celtic GENOVEFA).
JETON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
Pronounced: yetton
From the Albanian verb: jeton (is alive, lives on)
JUNIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
KAHINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Northern African, Berber
Derived from Arabic الكاهِنة (al-Kahinah) meaning "the diviner, the fortuneteller". This was a title applied to the 7th-century Berber queen Dihya, who resisted the Arab expansion into North Africa.
KATELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Breton form of KATHERINE.
KATTALIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ka-KYA-leen
Basque form of KATHERINE.
KESTREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KEHS-trəl
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
KETURAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə(English) ki-TYOOR-ə(English)
Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.
KILLIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Anglicized variant of CILLIAN, also used in France.
KITTEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KIT-TEN
Derived from the name Katherine, or Katrina, meaning a small Cat, like the small meaning of it's longer names
KITTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIT-ee
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KLERVI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Breton form of CREIRWY. This was the name of an early Breton saint from Wales, a sister of Saint GUÉNOLÉ.
KOSOVARE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Pronounced: kosovare
From the region called Kosovo (Kosova in Albanian) that declared independence in 2008.

Kosovare Asilani plays for the Swedish national women's football team.

KRENARE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Pronounced: kre-NA-re
Possibly derived from Albanian krenar, krenare "proud".
KVETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovak
Pronounced: KVEH-ta
Slovak form of KVĚTA.
LARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Other Scripts: Лара(Russian)
Pronounced: LAHR-ə(English) LA-ra(German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch) LA-RA(French) LA-ru(Portuguese) LAW-raw(Hungarian)
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel Doctor Zhivago (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LESLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Elaborated form of LESLIE.
LETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHT-ee
Diminutive of LETTICE.
LOREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-een
Elaboration of LORA.
LORELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of LAUREL.
LOREN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ən
Either a short form of LAURENCE (1) (masculine) or a variant of LAUREN (feminine).
LORENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-een
Elaboration of LORA.
LORINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, American (Archaic), Arabic (Modern, Rare)
Other Scripts: لورين(Arabic)
Pronounced: LO-REEN(French)
French form of LAURA.
LORN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAWRN
Variant of LORNE.
LUSINEH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Լուսինե(Armenian)
Pronounced: loo-see-NEH
Alternate transcription of Armenian Լուսինե (see LUSINE).
MAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton
Breton form of MAËL.
MAEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
MARC'HARIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton (Rare)
Variant of MARC'HARID.
MARISHKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
MATAR
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Arabic
Other Scripts: مطر(Arabic) מטר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: mah-TAHR(Hebrew)
Means "rain" in Hebrew and Arabic.
MAXENCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAK-SAHNS
French form of the Roman name Maxentius, a derivative of Latin maximus "greatest". This was the agnomen of an early 4th-century Roman emperor, a rival of Constantine. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint from Agde in France.
MAXFIELD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Transferred use of the surname MAXFIELD.
MAZHEV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton
Breton form of MATTHEW.
MEDIHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Arabic (Egyptian), Bosnian, Albanian
Other Scripts: مديحة(Egyptian Arabic)
Pronounced: Mədee:hah(Egyptian Arabic)
Derived from MIDHA.
MEGUMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 恵, 愛, etc.(Japanese Kanji) めぐみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: MEH-GOO-MEE
From Japanese (megumi) meaning "favour, benefit" or (megumi) meaning "love, affection", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that have the same reading. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
MEHEITAV'EL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מְהֵיטַבְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Hebrew form of MEHETABEL.
MEHETABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מְהֵיטַבְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mi-HEHT-ə-behl(English)
From the Hebrew name מְהֵיטַבְאֵל (Meheitav'el) meaning "God makes happy". This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
MEIRAV
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Jewish
Other Scripts: מירב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: meirav
This name is an alternative spelling of the English name Merab, with a modernized and none-contested meaning.

In Biblical Hebrew, then name מרב was given to one of the daughters of Saul. Note the lack of the letter י. The meaning of the name is the subject of some contention, mostly centering on the lack or presence of the letter י as the Hebrew word for water מים, if part of the name's root, would require the י.

Some modern parents give the name מירב to their daughters. Note the presence of the letter י. In this form, the name means "Much water". Also in this form, the only correct way to pronounce the name is as Meirav, thus this is considered a modern form of spelling the name in English. The pronunciation of the name without the י is as contentious as the meaning.

MERAB (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מֵרַב(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "abundant" in Hebrew. This is the name of a daughter of Saul in the Old Testament.
MERRY (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-ee
From the English word merry, ultimately from Old English myrige. This name appears in Charles Dickens' novel Martin Chuzzlewit (1844), where it is a diminutive of MERCY.
MIDIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מִדְיָן(Hebrew) مدين(Arabic)
Pronounced: Mid-ee-in(Biblical English)
Means "strife" or "judgment" in Hebrew. In the Hebrew Bible, Midian was a son of ABRAHAM and KETURAH.
MIRALEM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bosnian
From Arabic أَمِير (ʾamīr) meaning "prince, commander" combined with عَلِيم (ʿalīm) meaning "knowing, learned".
MIRDZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Latvian, Theatre
Derived from Latvian mirdzēt "to shine; to glitter". This name was used on a character in the play Vaidelote (1894) by the Latvian poet and playwright Aspazija.
MIREILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-RAY
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem Mirèio (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".
MIRELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Albanian
Romanian, Croatian and Albanian form of MIREILLE.
MIRELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: מירעלע(Yiddish)
Yiddish diminutive of MIRIAM.
MIREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: MEE-rehn
Basque form of MARIA.
NAARAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
HELAH was the first wife of ASHUR and NAARAH was his second wife. The name means "girl" or "maiden" in Hebrew. NAARAH was of the tribe of JUDAH and gave birth to AHUZAM, HEPHER, TEMENI, and HAAHASHTARI (1 Chr. 4:5, 6). This name may have given rise to the Basque name NAIARA.
NADÈGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NA-DEZH
French form of NADEZHDA.
NADEZHDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надежда(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də(Russian)
Means "hope" in Slavic.
NARELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Meaning unknown. It was borne by the wife of Umbarra, who was a 19th-century leader of the Yuin, an Australian Aboriginal people.
NASIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ناصرة, نصيرة(Arabic)
Pronounced: NA-see-rah, na-SEE-rah
Feminine form of NASIR.
NASTASYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Настасья(Russian)
Short form of ANASTASIYA.
NAVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: נָאוָה(Hebrew)
Means "beautiful" in Hebrew.
NAZARIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Назарій(Ukrainian) Назарий(Russian)
Ukrainian and Russian form of NAZARIUS.
NEDELEG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton (Rare)
Pronounced: nay-DE-lek
Directly taken from Breton nedeleg "Christmas", this name is considered a Breton cognate of NOËL.
NELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Slovak, Portuguese, Czech
Pronounced: NEH-la(Czech)
Short form of names ending in nela, such as ANTONELA.
NETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEHT-ee
Diminutive of names ending in nette, such as ANNETTE or JEANETTE.
NEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of NIAMH.
NEVENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Невена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".
NOLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Elaborated form of NOLA.
NOLWENN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
From the Breton phrase Noyal Gwenn meaning "holy one from Noyal". This was the epithet of a 6th-century saint and martyr from Brittany.
NOOR (1)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: نور(Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: NOOR(Arabic)
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Urdu نور (see NUR).
OANEZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Derived from Breton oan "lamb" (ultimately from Latin agnus) and used as a Breton form of AGNES.
ODED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֹדֵד(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "to restore" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet from Samaria.
OFRA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֹפְרָה, עוֹפְרָה(Hebrew)
Modern Hebrew form of OPHRAH. Originally it was a masculine name, but it is now used for females too.
ORIEL
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Probably a form of AURIEL or ORIOLE, the spelling influenced in Britain, perhaps, by Oriel College, Oxford. The college takes its name from Latin oriolum "gallery, porch", but there was a medieval personal name, Orieldis or Aurildis, which came from Old German and meant "fire-strife". It was that name in the Middle Ages which led to the surname Oriel. Auriel and Oriel were revived at roughly the same time, at the beginning of the 20th century, and were clearly heard by parents as the same name. The Au- spelling was the first to appear in official records, but one cannot be sure which name was a variant of the other. Oriole is an occasional variant. (Source: Dunkling & Gosling, 1983)

In French, refers to the birds known as orioles. In Latin, refers to the birds' golden color.

ORIOL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: oo-ree-AWL
From a Catalan surname meaning "golden". It has been used in honour of Joseph Oriol, a 17th-century saint.
OZIRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bosnian, Croatian
Bosnian and Croatian form of OSIRIS.
PERENELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Literature, Medieval French
Pronounced: PER-UN-EL(French) per-ən-EL(English, Literature, Old French)
Old French form of PETRONILLA borne by Perenelle Flamel (1320-1402), wife and fellow alchemist of Nicolas Flamel. They are known for their quest to discover the philosopher's stone, a legendary substance said to turn any metal into gold and to make its owner immortal.

Today, Perenelle is most commonly known for her mention in J.K. Rowling's fantasy novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, in which she and her husband have succeeded in creating the stone and have lived to be in their mid 600s.

RADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Рада(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".
RAHELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Рахела(Serbian)
Romanian, Croatian and Serbian form of RACHEL.
RAIN (1)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RAYN
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
RAZIËL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Dutch form of RAZIEL.
RAZIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: רָזִיאֵלָה(Hebrew)
Feminine form of RAZIEL.
REDD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REHD
Variant of RED.
ROMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RO-mee(German, English)
Diminutive of ROSEMARIE or ROSEMARY.
ROPARZH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton
Breton form of ROBERT.
ROSMERTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology
Pronounced: roz-MER-tə(English)
Probably means "great provider" from Gaulish ro, an intensive prefix (hence "very, most, great"), combined with smert "purveyor, carer" and the feminine name suffix a. This was the name of an obscure Gallo-Roman goddess of fertility, abundance and prosperity. The author J. K. Rowling borrowed the name for a witch in her 'Harry Potter' series.
ROWLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Variant of ROLY.
RUBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUZHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ружа(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Means "hollyhock" in Bulgarian and Macedonian (referring to flowering plants from the genera Alcea and Althaea).
SAMZUN
Usage: French
SEDNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.
ŠEHERZADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Bosnian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Шехерзада(Serbian)
Pronounced: she-kherr-ZAH-dah
Variant of ŠEHEREZADA.
SELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEE-lə
From the name of a city, the capital of Edom, which appears in the Old Testament. It means "rock" in Hebrew.
SHALHEVET
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: שַׁלְהֶבֶת(Hebrew)
Means "flame" in Hebrew. This word appears briefly in the Old Testament books of Job and Ezekiel.
SHOHREH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: شهره(Persian)
Means "famous" in Persian.
SOLÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LEHN
Variant of SOLANGE.
SORSHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: SOR-shə
The name of a character in Ron Howard's movie "Willow" (1988). In it, she is a princess, the daughter of the evil Queen Bavmorda. She ends up betraying her mother to serve the cause of good. George Lucas, who wrote the story for the movie, may have based Sorsha's name on either SORCHA or SAOIRSE.
STERENN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Directly taken from Breton sterenn "star" (cf. STEREN), this name is occasionally considered the Breton equivalent of Saint ASTERIA.
TALLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English
Pronounced: TA - LEE(Hebrew) TAL-ee(English) Ta-lee(English)
Diminutive of TALLULAH, Talia and other names that begin with or contain the element "Tal-".
TANSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAN-zee
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
TEAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEEL
From the English word for the type of duck or the greenish-blue colour.
THOMASIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic), Cornish (Archaic)
Feminine form of THOMAS. Thomasin was one of the most popular girls names in the Middle Ages.
TIPPI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TOVAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טוֹבָה(Hebrew)
Alternate transcription of Hebrew טוֹבָה (see TOVA (1)).
TZAHALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Modern)
Other Scripts: צהלה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: tza ha la
Means "happiness, revelry, merriment" in Hebrew.
TZION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִיוֹן(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of ZION.
TZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of ZIPPORAH.
VARFOLOMEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Варфоломей(Russian)
Russian form of BARTHOLOMEW.
VELVELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: װעלװעלע(Yiddish)
Feminine form of VELVEL.
VENYAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Вениамин(Russian)
Pronounced: vyi-nyi-u-MYEEN
Alternate transcription of Russian Вениамин (see VENIAMIN).
VESELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Весела(Bulgarian)
Derived from South Slavic vesel meaning "cheerful".
WARD (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWRD
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
YEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Ева(Russian) Եվա(Armenian)
Pronounced: YEH-və(Russian) yeh-VAH(Armenian)
Russian and Armenian form of EVE.
YEVGENIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Евгения(Russian)
Pronounced: yiv-GYEH-nyi-yə, iv-GYEH-nyi-yə
Russian form of EUGENIA.
YISHAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of JESSE.
YLVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".
YOCHEVED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יוֹכֶבֶד(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of JOCHEBED.
ZAHARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Захарина(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian and Macedonian feminine form of ZECHARIAH.
ZAREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: زرین(Urdu)
Variant of ZARINA.
ZEMFIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tatar, Bashkir, Literature
Other Scripts: Земфира(Tatar, Bashkir)
Meaning unknown, possibly of Romani origin. This name was (first?) used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem The Gypsies (1827).
ZEPHON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Other Scripts: צפון(Hebrew)
Variant of ZIPHION. Means "hidden" in Hebrew. In the apocryphal Book of Enoch this was the name of an angel sent by the archangel Gabriel, along with the angel ITHURIEL, to find the location of Satan after his fall.
ZHANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Жанна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: ZHAN-nə(Russian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian form of JEANNE.
ZINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
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