Names Categorized "ocean"

This is a list of names in which the categories include ocean.
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AHTImFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Finnish god of the ocean, rivers and fishing.
ALDA (3)fIcelandic
Means "wave" in Icelandic.
ALON (2)mFilipino, Tagalog
Means "wave" in Tagalog.
APHRODITEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phoenician origin. Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty, identified with the Roman goddess Venus. She was the wife of Hephaestus and the mother of Eros, and she was often associated with the myrtle tree and doves. The Greeks connected her name with αφρος (aphros) "foam", resulting in the story that she was born from the foam of the sea. Many of her characteristics are based on the goddess known as Ashtoreth to the Phoenicians and Ishtar to the Mesopotamian Semitic peoples, and on the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
ASHERAHfSemitic Mythology
Perhaps derived from Semitic roots meaning "she who walks in the sea". This was the name of a Semitic mother goddess. She was worshipped by the Israelites before the advent of monotheism.
BO (2)m & fChinese
From Chinese () meaning "wave", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
CHAOm & fChinese
From Chinese (chāo) meaning "surpass, leap over" (which is usually only masculine), (cháo) meaning "tide, flow, damp", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
CORALfEnglish, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
DARYA (2)fPersian
Means "sea, ocean" in Persian.
DENİZf & mTurkish
Means "sea" in Turkish.
DERYAf & mTurkish
Means "sea, ocean" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
DORISfEnglish, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
ERASMUSmLate Greek (Latinized)
Derived from Greek ερασμιος (erasmios) meaning "beloved". Saint Erasmus, also known as Saint Elmo, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus was also the name of a Dutch scholar of the Renaissance period.
GAL (1)f & mHebrew
Means "wave" in Hebrew.
GYATSOmTibetan
From Tibetan རྒྱ་མཚོ (rgya-mtsho) meaning "ocean". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).
HADRIANmHistory
From the Roman cognomen Hadrianus, which meant "from Hadria" in Latin. Hadria was the name of two Roman settlements. The first (modern Adria) is in northern Italy and was an important Etruscan port town. The second (modern Atri) is in central Italy and was named after the northern town. The Adriatic Sea is also named after the northern town.... [more]
ITSASOfBasque
Means "ocean" in Basque.
JONAHmEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
KAI (3)m & fHawaiian
Means "sea" in Hawaiian.
KAIMANAm & fHawaiian
From Hawaiian kai "ocean, sea" and mana "power". It is also Hawaiian meaning "diamond", derived from the English word diamond.
KAITOmJapanese
From Japanese (kai) meaning "sea, ocean" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
KENTmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from Kent, the name of a county in England, which may be derived from a Brythonic word meaning "coastal district".
KLYTIËfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτος (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
KYLEmEnglish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
LLYRmWelsh Mythology
Means "the sea" in Welsh. This was the name of the Welsh god of the sea. He possibly forms the basis for the legendary King Lear of the Britons.
MALIK (2)mNative American, Greenlandic
Means "wave" in Greenlandic.
MANAMIfJapanese
From Japanese (mana) meaning "love, affection" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "sea, ocean". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MARAĴAfEsperanto
Means "made of the sea" in Esperanto.
MARINUSmAncient Roman, Dutch
From the Roman family name Marinus, which derives either from the name MARIUS or from the Latin word marinus "of the sea".
MARISfEnglish (Rare)
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
MARISOLfSpanish
Combination of MARÍA and SOL (1) or SOLEDAD. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".
MARYfEnglish, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".... [more]
MEERAfIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada
Variant transcription of MIRA (1).
MELTEMfTurkish
Means "sea wind" in Turkish.
MERLINmArthurian Romance, English
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".... [more]
MERRILLmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the given name MURIEL.
MERYLfEnglish
Variant of MURIEL, influenced by the spelling of the name CHERYL. A famous bearer is American actress Meryl Streep (1949-), whose real name is Mary Louise Streep.
MIRA (1)fIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada
Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.
MOANAf & mMaori, Hawaiian, Tahitian
Means "ocean, wide expanse of water, deep sea" in Maori and Hawaiian (as well as in other Polynesian languages).
MORGAN (1)m & fWelsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MORGAN (2)fArthurian Romance
Modern form of Morgen, which was used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century for the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was unnamed in earlier stories. Geoffrey probably did not derive it from the Welsh masculine name Morgan, which would have been spelled Morcant in his time. He may have based it on the Irish name MUIRGEN.
MUIRmScottish
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "moor, fen". It also means "sea" in Scottish Gaelic.
MUIREALLfScottish
Scottish form of MUIRGEL.
MUIRGELfIrish
Means "bright sea", derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and geal "bright".
MUIRGENfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "born of the sea" in Gaelic. In Irish legend this was the name of a woman (originally named Líban) who was transformed into a mermaid. After 300 years she was brought to shore, baptized, and transformed back into a woman.
MUIRGHEALfIrish
Modern form of MUIRGEL.
MURCHADHmIrish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and cadh "warrior".
MURIELfEnglish, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name which was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
MURIELLEfFrench
French variant of MURIEL.
NAIAfBasque
Means "wave, sea foam" in Basque.
NANAMIfJapanese
From Japanese (nana) meaning "seven" and (mi) meaning "sea". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
NEIFIONmWelsh
Welsh form of NEPTUNE.
NEPTUNEmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.
NEREUSmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Derived from Greek νηρος (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
NIAMHfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
NJORDmNorse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old Norse Njörðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigourous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
OCEANm & fEnglish (Rare)
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.
OCÉANEfFrench
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".
OKEANOSmGreek Mythology
From the name of the river or body of water thought by the ancient Greeks to surround the Earth. In Greek mythology Okeanos was the Titan who personified this body of water.
ONA (2)fCatalan
Short form of MARIONA. It also coincides with a Catalan word meaning "wave".
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PELAGIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Πελαγιος (Pelagios), which was derived from πελαγος (pelagos) "the sea". This was the name of several saints and two popes.
PONTIUSmAncient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman family name. The family had Samnite roots so the name probably originated from the Oscan language, likely meaning "fifth" (a cognate of Latin Quintus). Alternatively, it could be derived from the name of the ancient province of Pontus in Asia Minor, itself probably from Greek ποντος (pontos) "sea". A notable bearer of this name was Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea who appears in the New Testament.
POSEIDONmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek ποσις (posis) "husband, lord" and δα (da) "earth". The name first appears in Mycenaean Greek inscriptions as po-se-da-o. In Greek mythology Poseidon was the unruly god of the sea and earthquakes, the brother of Zeus. He was often depicted carrying a trident and riding in a chariot drawn by white horses.
ROSEMARYfEnglish
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
SALACIAfRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin sal meaning "salt". This was the name of the Roman goddess of salt water.
SEDNAfMythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.
SHELLfEnglish
Short form of MICHELLE or SHELLEY. It can also be simply from the English word shell (ultimately from Old English sciell).
TETHYSfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek τηθη (tethe) meaning "grandmother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan associated with the sea. She was the wife of Oceanus.
TIAMATfSemitic Mythology
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.
UNDINEfLiterature
Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.
VARUNAmHinduism
Probably from a Sanskrit word meaning "to surround". In Hindu mythology Varuna is a god of water and the celestial ocean surrounding the world. He is one of the chief gods in the Hindu text the Rigveda.
VELLAMOfFinnish Mythology
From Finnish velloa "to surge, to swell". This was the name of a Finnish goddess of the sea, the wife of Ahti.
YAMmSemitic Mythology
Means "sea" in Ugaritic. Yam was the Ugaritic god of the sea, also associated with chaos, storms and destruction. He was a son of the chief god El.
YANGm & fChinese
From Chinese (yáng) meaning "ocean" or (yáng) meaning "light, sun, male" (which is typically only masculine), as well as other Chinese characters pronounced similarly.
YOKOfJapanese
Variant transcription of YOUKO.
YOUKOfJapanese
From Japanese (you) meaning "light, sun, male" or (you) meaning "ocean" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.