Mythology Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
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PRYDERImWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "care" in Welsh. According to Welsh legend this was the name of the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. A central character in the Mabinogion, he succeeds his father as king of Dyfed, but is ultimately killed in single combat with Gwydion.
PSYCHEfGreek Mythology
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψυχω (psycho) "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem 'Ode to Psyche' (1819).
PTAHmEgyptian Mythology
Possibly means "opener" in Egyptian. Ptah was an Egyptian god associated with creation and the arts.
PUCKm & fAnglo-Saxon Mythology, Dutch
Meaning unknown, from Old English puca. It could ultimately be of either Germanic or Celtic origin. In English legend this was the name of a mischievous spirit, also known as Robin Goodfellow. He appears in Shakespeare's play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1600).
PURUSHOTTAMAmHinduism
Means "the best man" from Sanskrit पुरुष (purusha) meaning "man" and उत्तम (uttama) meaning "highest". This is another name of either of the Hindu gods Vishnu or Krishna.
PWYLLmWelsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh mythology, Pwyll is a king of Dyfed who pursues and finally marries Rhiannon.
PYRRHUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Πυρρος (Pyrros) which meant "flame-coloured, red", related to πυρ (pyr) "fire". This was another name of Neoptolemus the son of Achilles. This was also the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Epirus.
PYTHIOSmGreek Mythology
From the Greek place name Πυθω (Pytho), an older name of the city of Delphi, which was probably derived from Greek πυθω (pytho) meaning "to rot". This was an epithet of Apollo.
QUETZALCOATLmAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
QUIRINUSmRoman Mythology, Late Roman
Possibly derived from the Sabine word quiris meaning "spear". Quirinus was a Sabine and Roman god who was later identified with Mars. The name was also borne by several early saints.
RAmEgyptian Mythology
Possibly means "sun" in Egyptian. Ra was an important Egyptian sun god originally worshipped in Heliopolis in Lower Egypt. He was usually depicted as a man with the head of a falcon crowned with a solar disc. In later times his attributes were often merged with those of other deities, such as Amon, Atum and Horus.
RADHAf & mHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi
Means "success" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the favourite consort of the Hindu god Krishna.
RAGHUmHinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam
Means "swift" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a heroic king in Hindu epics, the great-grandfather of Rama. It is also mentioned as the name of a son of Buddha in Buddhist texts.
RAGUELmJudeo-Christian Legend
Means "friend of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels.
RAIDENmFar Eastern Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (den) meaning "lightning". This is a regional epithet of the Japanese god Raijin.
RAIJINmFar Eastern Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (jin) meaning "god, spirit". This is the name of the god (or gods) of thunder and storms in the mythology of Japan.
RAJANIf & mHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali
Means "the dark one" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Kali or Durga.
RAMA (1)mHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam
Means "pleasing, beautiful" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He is the hero of the 'Ramayana', a Hindu epic, which tells of the abduction of his wife Sita by the demon king Ravana, and his efforts to recapture her.
RAMA (2)fHinduism
Means "wife" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the goddess Lakshmi.
RAMACHANDRAmHinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu
Derived from the name of the Hindu god RAMA (1) combined with Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon". This is another name of Rama.
RAMESHAmHinduism
Means "husband of Lakshmi", derived from RAMA (2), a name of Lakshmi, combined with ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, husband". This is one of the names of the Hindu god Vishnu.
RAMESHVARAmHinduism
Means "lord of Rama", derived from the name of the Hindu god RAMA (1) combined with Sanskrit ईश्वर (ishvara) meaning "lord, god". This is another name for the Hindu god Shiva.
RANGImMaori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "sky" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology Rangi or Ranginui was a god of the sky, husband of the earth goddess Papa. They were locked in a crushing embrace but were eventually separated by their children, the other gods.
RASHNmPersian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Rashnu meaning "justice". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata who judged the souls of the dead.
RASHNUmPersian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of RASHN.
RATIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "rest, pleasure" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the wife of the Hindu god of love Kama.
RAVImHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Odia, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "sun" in Sanskrit. Ravi is a Hindu god of the sun, sometimes equated with Surya. A famous bearer was the musician Ravi Shankar (1920-2012).
RAVINDRAmHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Kannada
Means "lord of the sun" from Sanskrit रवि (ravi) meaning "sun" combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This is another name for the Hindu god Surya.
REmEgyptian Mythology
Variant spelling of RA.
REMIELmJudeo-Christian Legend
Possibly means "God exalts" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels. He is also named Jeremiel.
REMUSmRoman Mythology, Romanian
Meaning unknown. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of Rome. Remus was later slain by Romulus.
REVAfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "one that moves" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Rati.
RHEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ρεια (Rheia), meaning unknown, perhaps related to ‘ρεω (rheo) "to flow" or ερα (era) "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RHEIAfGreek Mythology
Greek form of RHEA.
RHIANNONfWelsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RIGANTONAfCeltic Mythology
Reconstructed old Celtic form of RHIANNON.
RÍOGHNACHfIrish Mythology
Derived from Irish ríoghan meaning "queen". In Irish legend this was a wife of the Irish king Niall.
ROMULUSmRoman Mythology
Means "of Rome" in Latin. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of the city of Rome.
ROSTAMmPersian, Persian Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly from Avestan raodha "to grow" and takhma "strong, brave, valiant". Rostam was a warrior hero in Persian legend. The 11th-century Persian poet Firdausi recorded his tale in the 'Shahnameh'.
RUKMINIfHinduism
Means "adorned with gold" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of a princess who became the wife of Krishna.
SAAMmPersian, Persian Mythology
Variant transcription of SAM (2).
SABIAfIrish Mythology
Latinized form of SADB.
SADBfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "sweet, goodly" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish mythology Sadb was the mother of Oisín.
SADHBHfIrish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of SADB.
SAGAfNorse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".
SALACIAfRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin sal meaning "salt". This was the name of the Roman goddess of salt water.
SAM (2)mPersian, Persian Mythology
Means "dark" in Avestan. This is the name of a hero in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SAMAELmJudeo-Christian Legend
Means "severity of God" in Hebrew. This is the name of an archangel in Jewish tradition, described as a destructive angel of death.
SAMPOmFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Finnish mythology this is the name of a magical artifact (perhaps a mill) created by the smith god Ilmarinen.
SANDHYAfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam
Means "twilight" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu god Brahma.
SANJAYAmHinduism
Means "completely victorious, triumphant" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a royal official in the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata'.
SARASWATIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "possessing water" from Sanskrit सरस् (saras) meaning "fluid, water, lake" and वती (vati) meaning "having". This is the name of a Hindu river goddess, also associated with learning and the arts, who is the wife of Brahma.
SAROSHmPersian Mythology
Middle Persian form of SOROUSH.
SARPEDONmGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek legend Sarpedon was the son of Zeus and Laodamia, and the king of the Lycians. He was one of the chief warriors who fought against the Greeks in defense of Troy, but he was killed by Patroclus. Another Sarpedon was the son of Zeus and Europa.
SATIfHinduism
Means "truthful" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this was the name of a goddess, a wife of Shiva. After her death she was reborn as the goddess Parvati.
SATISHAmHinduism
Means "lord of Sati" from the name of the Hindu goddess SATI combined with ईश (isha) meaning "ruler". This is another name for the Hindu god Shiva.
SATURNmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.
SAULĖfLithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Means "sun" in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian sun goddess.
SAVITRmHinduism
Means "rouser, stimulator" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu sun god, sometimes identified with Surya.
SAVITRIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "relating to the sun" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a hymn dedicated to Savitr, a Hindu sun god, and it is also the name of his daughter. It is borne by several other characters in Hindu epics, including a wife of Brahma, a wife of Shiva, and a daughter of Daksha. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' it is borne by King Satyavan's wife, who successfully pleas with Yama, the god of death, to restore her husband to life.
SEDNAfMythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.
SELENAfSpanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
SELENEfGreek Mythology, Greek
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
SEMELEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phrygian origin. In Greek mythology she was one of the many lovers of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, tricked Semele into asking Zeus to display himself in all his splendour as the god of thunder. When he did, Semele was struck by lightning and died, but not before giving birth to Dionysos.
SEPPO (1)mFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish seppä "smith". Seppo Ilmarinen ("the smith Ilmarinen") was the name of a master craftsman in the Finnish epic the 'Kalevala'.
SETH (2)mEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
From Σεθ (Seth), the Greek form of Egyptian Swtkh (reconstructed as Sutekh), which possibly means "pillar" or "dazzle". Seth was the Egyptian god of chaos and the desert, the slayer of Osiris. Osiris's son Horus eventually defeats Seth and has him banished to the desert.
SHAHRIVARmPersian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Kshathra Vairya meaning "desirable power". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a god of metal and a protector of the weak. This is also the name of the sixth month of the Iranian calendar.
SHAILAJAfHinduism, Indian, Telugu
Means "daughter of the mountain" in Sanskrit, from शैल (shaila) meaning "mountain" and (ja) meaning "born". This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
SHAKTIf & mHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "power" in Sanskrit. In Hinduism a shakti is the female counterpart of a god. The name Shakti is used in particular to refer to the female counterpart of Shiva, also known as Parvati among many other names.
SHAKUNTALAfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit शकुन्त (shakunta) meaning "bird". This is the name of a character in Hindu legend, her story adapted by Kalidasa for the 5th-century play 'Abhijnanashakuntalam'. It tells how Shakuntala, who was raised in the forest by birds, meets and marries the king Dushyanta. After a curse is laid upon them Dushyanta loses his memory and they are separated, but eventually the curse is broken after the king sees the signet ring he gave her.
SHALIMmSemitic Mythology
From the Semitic root shalam meaning "peace". This was the name of an Ugaritic god associated with the evening.
SHAMASHmSemitic Mythology
Means "the sun" in Akkadian. This was the Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian name of Utu.
SHAMSfSemitic Mythology
Means "the sun" in Arabic. This was a pre-Islamic Arabian goddess of the sun, identified with the Akkadian sun god Shamash (whose name is related) and the northern Arabian goddess Nuha.
SHANI (2)mHinduism
From the Sanskrit name of the planet Saturn. This is the name of a celestial Hindu god.
SHANKARAmHinduism
Derived from the Sanskrit elements शम् (sham) meaning "auspicious, lucky" and कर (kara) meaning "maker". This is another name of the Hindu god Shiva. This was also the name of a 9th-century Indian religious philosopher also known as Shankaracharya.
SHANTAfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "pacified, calm" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Ramayana' this is the name of a daughter of King Dasharatha.
SHANTANUmHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Means "wholesome" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this is the name of a king of Hastinapura.
SHIVA (1)mHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit शिव (shiva) meaning "benign, kind, auspicious". Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and restoration, the husband of the mother goddess Parvati. His aspect is usually terrifying, but it can also be gentle.
SHIVALIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "beloved of SHIVA (1)" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
SHRIfHinduism
Means "diffusing light, radiance, beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Lakshmi. This word is also commonly used as a title of respect in India.
SHRIDEVIfHinduism
From the name of the Hindu goddess SHRI combined with Sanskrit देवी (devi) meaning "goddess". This is another name of Lakshmi.
SHRIPATImHinduism
Means "husband of Shri" from the name of the Hindu goddess SHRI combined with Sanskrit पति (pati) meaning "husband, lord". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
SHULMANUmSemitic Mythology
Possibly cognate with the Western Semitic god SHALIM. Shulmanu was an Eastern Semitic (Mesopotamian) god associated with battle.
SHYAMAm & fHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit श्याम (shyama) meaning "dark, black, blue". This is a transcription of the masculine form श्याम, which is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, as well as the feminine form श्यामा, one of the many names of the wife of the god Shiva. It is also the name of a Jain goddess.
SIAVASHmPersian, Persian Mythology
Means "possessing black stallions" in Avestan. This is the name of a prince in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SIEGFRIEDmGerman, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SIEGLINDEfGerman, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied'.
SIGNÝfAncient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
SIGRÚNfAncient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a Valkyrie in Norse legend.
SIGURDmNorwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SILVANUSmRoman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SILVIAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SILVIUSmLate Roman, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
SIMON (2)mAncient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
SINmSemitic Mythology
From earlier Akkadian Su'en, of unknown meaning. This was the name of the Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian god of the moon. He was closely identified with the Sumerian god Nanna.
SINDRImNorse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SIONANNfIrish Mythology
The name of an Irish goddess, a granddaughter of Lir, who was the personification of the River Shannon. Her name is derived from the name of the river (see SHANNON).
SITAfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Means "furrow" in Sanskrit. Sita is the name of the Hindu goddess of the harvest in the 'Rigveda'. This is also the name of the wife of Rama (and an avatar of Lakshmi) in the Hindu epic the 'Ramayana'. In this story Sita is rescued by her husband from the demon king Ravana.
SIVfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Means "bride" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology Siv was the wife of Thor.
SKANDAmHinduism
Means "hopping, spurting, spilling" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of the god of war, also known as Kartikeya or Murugan. He is worshipped especially by the Tamils in southern India.
SKAÐIfNorse Mythology
Means "damage, harm" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology she was a mountain giantess associated with the winter and skiing, the wife of Njord and later Odin.
SKULDfNorse Mythology
Means "future" in Old Norse. She was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny, in Norse mythology. She was also one of the Valkyries.
SLÁINEf & mIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "health" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of a legendary high king of Ireland.
SOHRABmPersian, Persian Mythology
Probably from Middle Persian swhr "red" and ab "water". In the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh' this is the name of the son of the hero Rostam. He was tragically slain in battle by his father, who was unaware he was fighting his own son.
SOROUSHmPersian Mythology, Persian
Modern Persian form of Avestan Sraosha meaning "obedience". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata (or angel), later equated with the angel Gabriel.
SOSRUKOmCaucasian Mythology
Derived from Turkic suslä "menacing". This is the name of a trickster god in Caucasian mythology. He is the hero of the Nart sagas.
SRAOSHAmPersian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of SAROSH.
STRIBOGmSlavic Mythology
Possibly means "flowing god" in Slavic. Stribog was the Slavic god of the wind, cold, ice and frost.
SUBRAHMANYAmHinduism, Indian, Telugu
From the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" and ब्रह्मन् (brahman) meaning "transcendent reality, eternal truth". This is another name for the Hindu god Skanda.
SUMATIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "wise, good mind", derived from Sanskrit सु (su) meaning "good" and मति (mati) meaning "mind, thought". In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this is the name of King Sagara's second wife, who bore him 60,000 children.
SUMMANUSmRoman Mythology
Means "before the morning", derived from Latin sub "under, before" and mane "morning". Summanus was the Roman god of the night sky and night lightning, a nocturnal counterpart to Jupiter.
SUNDARAmHinduism
Derived from Sanskrit सुन्दर (sundara) meaning "beautiful". This is the name of several minor characters in Hindu texts, and is also another name of the Hindu god Krishna.
SUNITAfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "well conducted, wise", derived from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with नीत (nita) meaning "conducted, led". In Hindu legend this is the name of the daughter of King Anga of Bengal.
SURENDRAmHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Nepali
Means "lord of gods" from Sanskrit सुर (sura) meaning "god" combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This is another name for Indra.
SURESHAmHinduism
Means "ruler of the gods" from Sanskrit सुर (sura) meaning "god" and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, lord". This is another name of the Hindu gods Indra, Shiva or Vishnu.
SURYAmHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Indonesian
Means "sun" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu god of the sun.
SUSHILAf & mHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "good-tempered, well-disposed", derived from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with शील (shila) meaning "conduct, disposition". This is a transcription of both the feminine form सुशीला and the masculine form सुशील. This name is borne by wives of the Hindu gods Krishna and Yama.
SUTEKHmEgyptian Mythology
Reconstructed Egyptian form of SETH (2).
SVANHILDfNorwegian, Norse Mythology
Scandinavian cognate of SWANHILD. In Norse legend she was the daughter of Sigurd and Gudrun.
SVAROGmSlavic Mythology
Derived from Slavic svar "bright, clear". This was the name of the Slavic god of the sky and sun. He was originally the supreme god in Slavic mythology.
SVETOVIDmSlavic Mythology
Derived from the Slavic elements svetu "blessed, holy" and vidu "sight, view". This was the name of a four-headed Slavic god of war and light.
TAHMURASmPersian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan Takhma Urupi meaning "strong body". Takhma Urupi is a hero from the Avesta who later appears in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
TAMMUZmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew, Semitic Mythology
Semitic form of DUMUZI. The name of the god appears in the Book of Ezekiel in the Old Testament.
TANEmMaori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "man" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology Tane was the god of forests and light. He was the son of the sky god Rangi and the earth goddess Papa, who were locked in an embrace and finally separated by their son. He created the tui bird and, by some accounts, man.
TANGAROAmPolynesian Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Polynesian mythology he was the god of the sea, the son of Rangi and Papa. He separated his parents' embrace, creating the earth and the sky.
TANITHfSemitic Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
TAPIOmFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. Tapio was the Finnish god of forests, animals, and hunting.
TARA (2)fHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Means "star" in Sanskrit. Tara is the name of a Hindu astral goddess, the wife of Brhaspati. She was abducted by Soma, a god of the moon, leading to a great war that was only ended when Brahma intervened and released her. This is also the name of a Buddhist deity (a female Buddha).
TARANISmCeltic Mythology
Derived from Celtic taran meaning "thunder", cognate with Þórr (see THOR). This was the name of the Gaulish thunder god, who was often identified with the Roman god Jupiter.
TARHUNNAmNear Eastern Mythology
From Hittite or Luwian tarh meaning "to cross, to conquer". This was the name of the Hittite god of the weather, storms, and the sky, and the slayer of the dragon Illuyanka. He was closely identified with the Hurrian god Teshub, and sometimes with the Semitic god Hadad.
TATIUSmRoman Mythology, Ancient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, possibly of Sabine origin. According to Roman legend, Titus Tatius was an 8th-century BC king of the Sabines who came to jointly rule over the Romans and Sabines with the Roman king Romulus.
TELLERVOfFinnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. Tellervo was a Finnish forest goddess. She is variously described as either the wife or daughter of Tapio.
TERMINUSmRoman Mythology
Means "limit, boundary, end" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman god of boundaries.
TERPSICHOREfGreek Mythology
Means "enjoying the dance" from Greek τερψις (terpsis) "delight" and χορος (choros) "dance". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and dramatic chorus, one of the nine Muses.
TESHUBmNear Eastern Mythology
Meaning unknown, of Hurrian origin. This was the name of the Hurrian storm god. He was later conflated with the Hittite god Tarhunna.
TETHYSfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek τηθη (tethe) meaning "grandmother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan associated with the sea. She was the wife of Oceanus.
TEZCATLIPOCAmAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "smoking mirror" in Nahuatl. In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was one of the chief gods, associated with the night sky, winds, war, and the north. Like his rival Quetzalcoatl, he was a creator god.
THALEIAfGreek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of THALIA.
THALIAfGreek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
THANATOSmGreek Mythology
Means "death" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of death who resided with Hades in the underworld.
THEIAfGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek θεα (thea) meaning "goddess". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan goddess of sight, glittering and glory. She was the wife of Hyperion and the mother of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.
THEMISfGreek Mythology
Means "law of nature, divine law, that which is laid down" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan who presided over custom and natural law. She was often depicted blindfolded and holding a pair of scales. By Zeus she was the mother of many deities, including the three Μοιραι (Moirai) and the three ‘Ωραι (Horai).
THESEUSmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek τιθημι (tithemi) meaning "to set, to place". Theseus was a heroic king of Athens in Greek mythology. He was the son of Aethra, either by Aegeus or by the god Poseidon. According to legend, every seven years the Cretan king Minos demanded that Athens supply Crete with seven boys and seven girls to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-bull creature that was the son of Minos's wife Pasiphaë. Theseus volunteered to go in place of one of these youths in order to slay the Minotaur in the Labyrinth where it lived. He succeeded with the help of Minos's daughter Ariadne, who provided him with a sword and a roll of string so he could find his way out of the maze.
THORmNorse Mythology, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
ÞÓRRmNorse Mythology
Original Old Norse form of THOR.
THOTHmEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Djhwty (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
ÞUNORmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Þórr (see THOR).
TIAMATfSemitic Mythology
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.
TISIPHONEfGreek Mythology
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τισις (tisis) "vengeance" and φονη (phone) "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
TIWmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon form of Tiwaz (see TYR).
TLALOCmAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "of the earth" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of rain and fertility, the husband of Chalchiuhticue.
TURNUSmRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown. According to Virgil's 'Aeneid', Turnus was a king of the Rutuli. He led the Latins in war against the Trojans led by Aeneas. At the end of the book he is killed by Aeneas in a duel.
TUULIKKIfFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "little wind" in Finnish, derived from tuuli "wind". This was the name of a Finnish forest goddess, the daughter of Tapio.
TYCHEfGreek Mythology
Means "fortune, chance" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of fortune, luck and fate.
TYCHONmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek τυγχανω (tynchano) meaning "hit the mark, succeed". This was the name of a minor deity associated with Priapus in Greek mythology. It was also borne by a 5th-century saint from Cyprus.
TÝRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of TYR.
TYRmNorse Mythology
Norse form of the name of the Germanic god Tiwaz, related to Indo-European dyeus (see ZEUS). In Norse mythology Tyr was the god of war and justice, the son of the god Odin. He carried a spear in his left hand, since his right hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
UKKOmFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "old man" in Finnish. In Finnish mythology Ukko is the god of the sky and thunder.
ULYSSESmRoman Mythology, English
Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book 'Ulysses' (1920), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the 'Odyssey'.
UMAfHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Hindi
Means "flax" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati. In Hindu texts it is said to derive from the Sanskrit exclamation उ मा (u ma) meaning "O (child), do not (practice austerities)!" which was addressed to Parvati by her mother.
URANUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ουρανος (Ouranos), the name of the husband of Gaia and the father of the Titans in Greek mythology. His name is derived from ουρανος (ouranos) meaning "the heavens". This is also the name of the seventh planet in the solar system.
URDfNorse Mythology
From the Old Norse Urðr meaning "fate". In Norse mythology Urd was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny. She was responsible for the past.
URIENmWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Means "privileged birth" from Celtic orbo "privileged" and gen "birth". In Welsh legend and Arthurian romances Urien is a king of Gore and the husband of Morgan le Fay.
USHASfHinduism
Means "dawn" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu goddess of the dawn, considered the daughter of heaven.
UTHERmWelsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Uthyr, derived from Welsh uthr "terrible". In Arthurian legend Uther was the father of King Arthur. He appears in some early Welsh texts, but is chiefly known from the 12th-century chronicles of Geoffrey of Monmouth.
UTTARAm & fHinduism, Indian, Marathi
Means "north" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form उत्तर (also written Uttar) and the feminine form उत्तरा (also written Uttarā), both of which occur in the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' belonging to the son and daughter of King Virata.
UTUmSumerian Mythology
Derived from Sumerian 𒌓 (ud) meaning "sun". In Sumerian mythology this was the name of the god of the sun. He was the son of the moon god Nanna and Ningal.
VAHAGNmArmenian Mythology, Armenian
From Avestan Verethragna meaning "breaking of defense, victory". In Armenian mythology this was the name of the heroic god of war.
VÄINÄMÖINENmFinnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish väinä "wide and slow-flowing river". In Finnish mythology Väinämöinen was a wise old magician, the son of the primal goddess Ilmatar. He is the hero of the Finnish epic the 'Kalevala'.
VAISHNAVIfHinduism, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Marathi
Derived from the name of the Hindu god VISHNU, meaning "belonging to Vishnu". This is the name of one of the seven Matrika goddesses in Hinduism.
VALLIfHinduism
Means "creeping plant" in Dravidian. In Dravidian mythology the goddess Valli was the wife of Murunga.
VARUNAmHinduism
Probably from a Sanskrit word meaning "to surround". In Hindu mythology Varuna is a god of water and the celestial ocean surrounding the world. He is one of the chief gods in the Hindu text the Rigveda.
VASANTAmHinduism
Means "brilliant" or "spring" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu personification of the spring.
VASUmHinduism, Indian, Kannada, Malayalam, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi
Means "bright, excellent" in Sanskrit. This is an epithet of several Hindu gods. It also belonged to one of the authors of the Rigveda.
VAYUmHinduism
Means "air, wind" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu god of the air and wind, one of the five elements.
VELLAMOfFinnish Mythology
From Finnish velloa "to surge, to swell". This was the name of a Finnish goddess of the sea, the wife of Ahti.
VENAmHinduism
Derived from Sanskrit वेन (vena) meaning "yearning". This is the name of an evil king in Hindu mythology.
VENUSfRoman Mythology
Means "love, sexual desire" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of love and sex. Her character was assimilated with that of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. As the mother of Aeneas she was considered an ancestor of the Roman people. The second planet from the sun is named after her.
VERDANDIfNorse Mythology
From Old Norse Verðandi meaning "becoming, happening". Verdandi was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny, in Norse mythology. She was responsible for the present.
VERETHRAGNAmPersian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of BAHRAM.
VESTAfRoman Mythology
Probably a Roman cognate of HESTIA. Vesta was the Roman goddess of the hearth. A continuous fire, tended by the Vestal Virgins, was burned in the Temple of Vesta in Rome.
VICTORIAfEnglish, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.... [more]
VIDARmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.
VIDYAfHinduism, Indian, Marathi, Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil
Means "knowledge, science, learning" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Saraswati.
VIJAYAm & fHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, Hindi
Means "victory" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form विजय and the feminine form विजया, both of which are used frequently in Hindu texts. It is the name of a grandson of Indra, a son of Krishna and it is another name of the goddess Durga. This was also the name of a semi-legendary 6th-century BC king of Sri Lanka.
VIKRAMAmHinduism
Means "stride, pace" or "valour" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu. This was also the name of a semi-legendary 1st-century BC king (full name Vikramaditya) of Ujjain in India.
VIRAJAmHinduism
Means "ruling, sovereign" in Sanskrit. This is the name of an offspring of Brahma in Hindu belief.
VISHNUmHinduism, Indian, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Marathi
Probably means "all-pervasive" in Sanskrit. The Hindu god Vishnu is the protector and preserver of the universe, usually depicted as four-armed and blue-skinned. By some Hindus he is regarded as the supreme god.
VÍÐARRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of VIDAR.
VOHU MANAHmPersian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of BAHMAN.
VOLOSmSlavic Mythology
Derived from Slavic volu meaning "ox". Volos was the Slavic god of cattle, also associated with the earth, wealth, the underworld, and poetry.
VÖLUNDmNorse Mythology
Scandinavian form of WIELAND.
VÖLUNDRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of WIELAND.
VULCANmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Vulcanus, possibly related to fulgere "to flash", but more likely of pre-Latin origin. In Roman mythology Vulcan was the god of fire. He was later equated with the Greek god Hephaestus.
WIELANDmGerman, Germanic Mythology
Meaning uncertain, perhaps a derivative of Germanic wela meaning "skilled, artful". In Germanic mythology Wieland (called Völundr in Old Norse) was an unequaled smith and craftsman.
WODANmGermanic Mythology
Continental Germanic cognate of Óðinn (see ODIN).
WODENmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Óðinn (see ODIN). The day of the week Wednesday is named for him.
XANTHEfGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
XANTHOSmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow". This is the name of several figures, mostly minor, in Greek mythology.
XOCHIPILLImAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
XOCHIQUETZALfAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "flower feather" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec goddess of love, flowers and the earth, the twin sister of Xochipilli.
YAMmSemitic Mythology
Means "sea" in Ugaritic. Yam was the Ugaritic god of the sea, also associated with chaos, storms and destruction. He was a son of the chief god El.
YAMA (1)mHinduism
Means "twin" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu god of death. He is also regarded as the first mortal being, or in other words, the first person to die. This name is related to Persian Jam.
YAMANUmEgyptian Mythology
Reconstructed Egyptian form of AMON.
YAMIfHinduism
Means "twin, pair" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of the first woman, the twin sister of the first man Yama.
YERUSLANmFolklore
From Tatar Uruslan, which was possibly from Turkic arslan meaning "lion". Yeruslan Lazarevich is the name of a hero in Russian and Tatar folktales. These tales were based on (or at least influenced by) Persian tales of their hero Rostam.
YIMAmPersian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of JAM.
YIMA KSHAETAmPersian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of JAMSHID.
YNGVImNorse Mythology
Possibly an Old Norse cognate of ING. This was an alternate name of the god Freyr, who as Yngvi-Freyr was regarded as the ancestor of the Swedish royal family.
ZALmPersian Mythology
Means "albino" in Persian. In the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh' this is the name of a white-haired warrior.
ZARAMAMAfIncan Mythology
Means "grain mother" in Quechua. This was the name of the Inca goddess of grain.
ZEPHYRmGreek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
ZEPHYRUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Zephyros (see ZEPHYR).
ZERACHIELmJudeo-Christian Legend
Possibly means "command of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels. His name is sometimes rendered as Sarakiel.
ZEUSmGreek Mythology
The name of a Greek god, related to the old Indo-European god *Dyeus, from a root meaning "shine" or "sky". In Greek mythology he was the highest of the gods. After he and his siblings defeated the Titans, Zeus ruled over the earth and humankind from atop Mount Olympus. He had control over the weather and his weapon was a thunderbolt.
ŽIVAfSlavic Mythology, Slovene
Means "living, alive" in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic goddess associated with life, fertility and spring.
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