Names Categorized "colors"

This is a list of names in which the categories include colors.
gender
usage
ADAM m English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADISA m Western African, Yoruba
Means "one who is clear" in Yoruba.
AERON m & f Welsh
Derived either from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of the River Aeron in Wales.
AERONA f Welsh
Variant of AERON.
AERONWEN f Welsh
Combination of AERON and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
AERONWY f Welsh
Extended form of AERON.
AFON f & m Welsh
Means "river" in Welsh. This is a Welsh name of recent origin.
AFRA (2) f Arabic
Means "whitish red" in Arabic.
AGAM f & m Hebrew
Means "lake" in Hebrew.
AI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
AILBHE f & m Irish
Possibly derived from the old Irish root albho meaning "white" or ail meaning "rock". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint, the founder of a monastery at Emly.
AINA (3) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens", as well as other character combinations.
AIRI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKANE f Japanese
From Japanese (akane) meaning "deep red, dye from the rubia plant". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
AKARI f Japanese
From Japanese (aka) meaning "bright" or (aka) meaning "vermilion red" combined with (ri) meaning "village" or (ri) meaning "white jasmine". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
AKI (2) f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
AKIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKIRA m & f Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
ALANI f English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of ALANA, or possibly from Hawaiian ʻalani meaning "orange (tree or fruit)".
ALBA (2) f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBUS.
ALBAN m German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus, which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBANO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Albanus (see ALBAN).
ALBANUS m Ancient Roman
Latin form of ALBAN.
ALBINE f French
French form of ALBINA.
ALBUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright" in Latin.
ALIKI f Greek
Greek form of ALICE. It also corresponds with the Greek word άλικη meaning "scarlet".
ALMOG m & f Hebrew
Means "coral" in Hebrew.
ALPIN m Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ailpein, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
ALTAN m Turkish
Means "red dawn" in Turkish.
AMBER f English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
AMETHYST f English (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and μέθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
ANARA f Kazakh, Kyrgyz
From Kazakh and Kyrgyz анар (anar) meaning "pomegranate", a word ultimately derived from Persian.
ANARGYROS m Greek
From the Greek term ἀνάργυρος (anargyros) meaning "poor, incorruptible", derived from Greek (a), a negative prefix, combined with ἄργυρος (argyros) meaning "silver". This term referred to saints who did not accept payment for their services.
AOI f & m Japanese
From Japanese (aoi) meaning "hollyhock, althea" or an adjectival form of (ao) meaning "green, blue". Other kanji with the same reading can form this name as well.
ARANKA f Hungarian
Derived from Hungarian arany meaning "gold". It is used as a vernacular form of AURÉLIA.
ARDIT m Albanian
Means "golden day" in Albanian, from ar "gold" and ditë "day".
ARDITA f Albanian
Feminine form of ARDIT.
ARGYRIS m Greek
Modern Greek form of ARGYROS.
ARGYROS m Ancient Greek
Means "silver" in Greek.
ARIANRHOD f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes. In earlier myths she was a goddess of the moon.
ARJUNA m Hinduism
Means "white, clear" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a hero in Hindu texts, the son of the god Indra and the princess Kunti.
ARUNA m & f Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Hindi
Means "reddish brown, dawn" in Sanskrit. The Hindu god Aruna (अरुण) is the charioteer who drives the sun god Surya across the sky. The modern feminine form अरुणा is also transcribed as Aruna, however the modern masculine form is Arun.
ARUSHI f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit अरुष (arusha) meaning "reddish, dawn", a word used in the Rigveda to describe the red horses of Agni. This name also appears in the Hindu epic the Mahabharata belonging to a daughter of Manu and the wife of Chyavana, though in this case it might derive from Sanskrit आरुषी (arushi) meaning "hitting, killing".
ASENA f Turkish
Possibly of Scythian origin meaning "blue". In Turkic mythology Asena was a grey wolf who gave birth to the ancestor of the Ashina tribe of Turks.
ASH m & f English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ÁUREA f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of AUREA.
AUREA f Late Roman
Late Latin name that was derived from aureus "golden". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Ostia (near Rome), as well as an 11th-century Spanish saint.
AURÈLE m French
French form of AURELIUS.
AURÉLIA f Slovak, Hungarian
Slovak and Hungarian feminine form of AURELIUS.
AURELIANO m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of AURELIANUS.
AURELIANUS m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was originally derived from the Roman family name AURELIUS.
AURÉLIE f French
French feminine form of AURELIUS.
AURÉLIEN m French
French form of AURELIANUS.
AURELIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from Latin aureus meaning "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.
AUREOLE f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "radiant halo", ultimately derived from Latin aureolus "golden".
AYA (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design", or other kanji characters with the same pronunciation.
AYAKA f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour" combined with (ka) or (ka) both meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AYAKO f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design" or (aya) meaning "brilliant fabric design, kimono design" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
AYAME f Japanese
From Japanese 菖蒲 (ayame) meaning "iris (flower)". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
AYANE f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design" or (aya) meaning "brilliant fabric design, kimono design" combined with (ne) meaning "sound". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AZAHAR f Spanish
Means "orange blossom" in Spanish, ultimately from Arabic زهرة (zahrah) meaning "flower". It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Azahar, meaning "Our Lady of the Orange Blossom", because of the citrus trees that surround a church devoted to her near Murcia.
AZURA f English (Rare)
Elaboration of AZURE.
AZURE f English (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
AZZURRA f Italian
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
BADR m & f Arabic
Means "full moon" in Arabic.
BADRI m Georgian
Georgian form of BADR.
BAILA f Yiddish
Variant of BEYLE.
BẢO m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (bảo) meaning "treasure, jewel".
BAO f & m Chinese
From Chinese (bǎo) meaning "treasure, jewel, precious, rare", (bāo) meaning "praise, honour" or (bāo) meaning "bud" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are possible as well.
BÉLA m Hungarian
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from Hungarian bél meaning "guts, bowel" or Slavic бѣлъ (belu) meaning "white". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.
BĚLA f Czech
Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning "white".
BERWYN m Welsh
Means "fair head" from the Welsh elements barr "head" and gwyn "white, fair".
BERYL f English
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
BEYLE f Yiddish (Rare)
From a Slavic word meaning "white".
BEYLKE f Yiddish (Rare)
Diminutive of BEYLE. This is the name of a daughter of Tevye in late 19th-century Yiddish stories by Sholem Aleichem, on which the musical Fiddler on the Roof was based.
BEYZA f Turkish
Means "very white" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic بيضاء (bayda).
BIANCA f Italian, Romanian
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in Taming of the Shrew (1593) and Othello (1603).
BIANKA f German, Hungarian, Polish
German, Hungarian and Polish form of BIANCA.
BÍBORKA f Hungarian
Derived from Hungarian bíbor meaning "purple".
BÍCH f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (bích) meaning "bluish green".
BLAINE m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
BLAKE m English
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BLANCA f Spanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan cognate of BLANCHE.
BLANCHARD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements blanc meaning "white" and hard meaning "brave, hardy".
BLANCHE f French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BLANKA f Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Croatian
Form of BLANCHE in several languages.
BLERTA f Albanian
Derived from Albanian blertë meaning "green".
BLODWEN f Welsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BLONDIE f English (Rare)
From a nickname for a person with blond hair. This is the name of the title character in a comic strip by Chic Young.
BORA (2) f Albanian
Derived from Albanian borë meaning "snow".
BORA (3) f Korean
Means "purple" in Korean.
BREINDEL f Yiddish (Rare)
Means "brunette" in Yiddish.
BROEN m Limburgish
Limburgish form of BRUNO.
BRONWEN f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BRUNA f Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of BRUNO.
BRUNELLA f Italian
Feminine diminutive of BRUNO.
BRUNO m German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged to Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BUDUR f Arabic
Strictly feminine form of BADR.
BURGUNDY f English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
BYELOBOG m Slavic Mythology
Means "the white god" from Slavic byelo "white" and bogu "god". This was the name of the Slavic god of the sun, happiness and fortune.
CAESO m Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, that was probably derived from Latin caesius meaning "blue-grey". This praenomen was only used by a few families.
CAESONIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CAESONIUS. This name was borne by Milonia Caesonia, the last wife of the Roman emperor Caligula.
CAESONIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was derived from the praenomen CAESO.
CAHAYA m & f Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Malay and Indonesian.
CAHYA m & f Indonesian
Variant of CAHAYA.
CAHYO m & f Javanese
Javanese form of CAHAYA.
CALFURAY f Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
CAM (1) f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cam) meaning "orange (fruit)".
CANDIDA f Late Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play Candida (1898).
CAOILFHIONN f Irish
Derived from the Irish elements caol "slender" and fionn "fair". This was the name of several Irish saints.
CARMINE m Italian
Italian masculine form of CARMEN.
CARWYN m Welsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "to love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
CATAHECASSA m Indigenous American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee warrior and chief of the 18th century.
CATALINA f Spanish, Corsican
Spanish and Corsican form of KATHERINE.
CEDAR f & m English (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κέδρος (kedros).
CEINWEN f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements cain "good, lovely" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
CERIDWEN f Welsh
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CERISE f French
Means "cherry" in French.
CHAE-WON f Korean
From Sino-Korean (chae) meaning "collect, gather, pluck" or (chae) meaning "colour" combined with (won) meaning "source, origin, beginning". Other hanja combinations can also form this name.
CHAE-YEONG f Korean
From Sino-Korean (chae) meaning "colour" combined with (yeong) meaning "glory, honour" or (yeong) meaning "jade". This name can be formed using other hanja combinations as well.
CHAE-YOUNG f Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 채영 (see CHAE-YEONG).
CHALCHIUHTLICUE f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "jade skirt" in Nahuatl. She was the Aztec goddess of water and rivers, the wife of Tlaloc.
CHAN m & f Khmer
Means "moon" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
CHANDER m Indian, Hindi
Alternate transcription of Hindi चन्द्र or चन्द्रा (see CHANDRA).
CHANDRA m & f Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts, which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHANDRAKANT m Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
CHANDRAKANTA f Indian, Hindi
Feminine form of CHANDRAKANT.
CHANNARY f Khmer
Means "moon-faced girl" from Khmer ចន្ទ (chan) meaning "moon" and នារី (neari) meaning "woman, girl".
CHARNA f Yiddish (Rare)
From a Slavic word meaning "black".
CHERNOBOG m Slavic Mythology
Means "the black god" from Slavic cherno "black" and bogu "god". Chernobog was the Slavic god of darkness, evil and grief.
CHERRY f English
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of CHARITY. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
CHEYANNE f English (Modern)
Variant of CHEYENNE probably influenced by the name ANNE (1).
CHEYENNE f & m English
Derived from the Dakota word shahiyena meaning "red speakers". This is the name of a Native American people of the Great Plains. The name was supposedly given to the Cheyenne by the Dakota because their language was unrelated to their own. As a given name, it has been in use since the 1950s.
CHLOE f English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHLOÉ f French
French form of CHLOE.
CHLORIS f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek χλωρός (chloros) meaning "pale green". Chloris, in Greek mythology, was a minor goddess of vegetation.
CHRYSA f Greek
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CHRYSANTA f English (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
CHRYSANTHI f Greek
Modern Greek feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CHRYSANTHOS m Greek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρύσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden" combined with ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
CHRYSES m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek χρύσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden". In Greek mythology Chryses was the father of Chryseis, a woman captured by Agamemnon during the Trojan War.
CHRYSOSTOMOS m Greek
Means "golden mouth", from Greek χρυσός (chrysos) meaning "gold" and στόμα (stoma) meaning "mouth". This was an epithet applied to eloquent orators, notably Saint John Chrysostom, a 4th-century archbishop of Constantinople.
CHRYSSA f Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Χρύσα (see CHRYSA).
CHUN f & m Chinese
From Chinese (chūn) meaning "spring (the season)" or other characters with a similar pronunciation.
CIAR m Irish
Derived from Irish ciar meaning "black".
CIARA (1) f Irish
Feminine form of CIAR. Saint Ciara was an Irish nun who established a monastery at Kilkeary in the 7th century.
CIARÁN m Irish
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.
CIARDHA m Irish
Derived from Irish ciar meaning "black".
CINDERELLA f Literature
Means "little ashes", in part from the French name Cendrillon. This is the main character in the folk tale Cinderella about a maltreated young woman who eventually marries a prince. This old story is best known in the English-speaking world from the French author Charles Perrault's 1697 version. She has other names in other languages, usually with the meaning "ashes", such as German Aschenputtel and Italian Cenerentola.
CLANCY m Irish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh, which means "son of Flannchadh". The Irish name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
CLOE f Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of CHLOE.
CLOÉ f Portuguese, French
Portuguese form and French variant of CHLOE.
COLBY m English
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
CORAL f English, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits that can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοράλλιον (korallion).
CORALIE f French
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORBIN m English
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
CRISÓSTOMO m Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHRYSOSTOMOS.
CYAN f & m English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κύανος (kyanos).
DAWA m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "moon, month" in Tibetan.
DEEP m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Punjabi
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीप, Gujarati દીપા, Bengali দীপ or Gurmukhi ਦੀਪ (see DIP).
DEEPA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीपा, Gurmukhi ਦੀਪਾ, Bengali দীপা, Malayalam ദീപ or Tamil தீபா (see DIPA).
DEEPAK m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi/Nepali दीपक, Bengali দীপক, Gujarati દીપક, Gurmukhi ਦੀਪਕ, Malayalam ദീപക്, Kannada ದೀಪಕ್, Tamil தீபக் or Telugu దీపక్ (see DIPAK).
DEEPALI f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीपाली (see DIPALI).
DEEPIKA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu
Alternate transcription of Hindi/Marathi दीपिका, Kannada ದೀಪಿಕಾ, Malayalam ദീപിക, Tamil தீபிகா or Telugu దీపికా (see DIPIKA).
DELWYN m Welsh
Means "pretty and white" from Welsh del "pretty" combined with gwyn "fair, white, blessed".
DHAVAL m Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "dazzling white" in Sanskrit.
DILWEN f Welsh
Feminine form of DILWYN.
DILWYN m Welsh
Means "genuine and white" from the Welsh element dilys "genuine" combined with gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
DIP m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Punjabi
Masculine form of DIPA.
DIPA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "light, lamp" in Sanskrit.
DIPAKA m Hinduism
Means "inflaming, exciting" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Kama, the Hindu god of love.
DIPALI f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "row of lamps" in Sanskrit.
DONAGH m Irish
Anglicized form of Donnchadh (see DUNCAN).
DONNCHAD m Ancient Irish
Older Irish form of Donnchadh (see DUNCAN).
DONNCHADH m Irish, Scottish
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of DUNCAN.
DONNDUBHÁN m Ancient Irish
Composed of the Irish element donn "brown" combined with dubh "dark" and a diminutive suffix.
DOUGAL m Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger".
DUANE m English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Dubhán meaning "descendant of DUBHÁN".
DUBHÁN m Irish
Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DUBHSHLÁINE m Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" and either slán "defiance" or Sláine, the Irish name of the River Slaney.
DUBHTHACH m Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" in combination with a second element of unknown meaning.
DUHA f & m Arabic
Means "morning" in Arabic.
DUNCAN m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play Macbeth (1606).
EACHANN m Scottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
EBONY f English
From the English word ebony for the black wood that comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used by black parents.
EDOM m Biblical
From Hebrew אָדֹם ('adom) meaning "red". According to the Old Testament, Esau, who is described as having red skin, was given this name because he traded his birthright for a helping of red broth. The bible goes on to tell that Esau was the founder of the ancient nation of Edom, located to the south of the kingdom of Judah.
EILWEN f Welsh
Perhaps means "white brow", derived from Welsh ael "brow" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is a recently-created Welsh name.
EIRIAN f & m Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
EIRWEN f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".
ELA (2) f Turkish
Means "hazel (colour)" in Turkish.
ELECTRA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἠλέκτρα (Elektra), derived from ἤλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
ELVA (1) f Irish
Anglicized form of AILBHE.
EMERALD f English (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμάραγδος (smaragdos).
ENFYS m & f Welsh
Means "rainbow" in Welsh.
ESMERALDA f Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
EUN m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" or (eun) meaning "silver, money", as well as other hanja characters that are pronounced in the same way. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
EURIG m Welsh
Derived from Welsh aur meaning "gold".
EURWEN f Welsh
Derived from Welsh aur "gold" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
FAJR f Arabic
Means "dawn, beginning" in Arabic.
FAWN f English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FENELLA f Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FERRER m Various
From a surname that meant "blacksmith" in Catalan. This name is often given in honour of Saint Vicente Ferrer, a 14th-century missionary who is the patron saint of builders.
FIDDA f Arabic
Means "silver" in Arabic.
FINDLAY m Scottish
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name FIONNLAGH.
FINGAL m Scottish
From Scottish Gaelic Fionnghall meaning "white stranger", derived from fionn "white, fair" and gall "stranger". This was the name of the hero in James Macpherson's 1762 epic poem Fingal, which he claimed to have based on early Gaelic legends about Fionn mac Cumhail.
FINNEGAN m Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of a character in James Joyce's novel Finnegans Wake (1939), the title of which was based on a 19th-century Irish ballad called Finnegan's Wake.
FINNIAN m Irish
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
FINTAN m Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FIONN m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.
FIONNUALA f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Irish fionn "white, fair" and guala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
FIZZA f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic فضّة (see FIDDA).
FLANAGAN m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Flannagáin meaning "descendant of Flannagán". The given name Flannagán is derived from Irish flann "red" and a diminutive suffix.
FLANN m & f Irish
Means "red" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of a 9th-century king of Tara in Ireland.
FLANNÁN m & f Irish
Diminutive of FLANN.
FLANNERY f & m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
FLAVIAN m History (Ecclesiastical)
From the Roman family name Flavianus, which was derived from FLAVIUS. This was the name of several early saints including a 5th-century patriarch of Constantinople who was beaten to death.
FLAVIANO m Italian
Italian form of FLAVIAN.
FLAVIEN m French
French form of FLAVIAN.
FLAVIENNE f French
French feminine form of FLAVIAN.
FLÁVIO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIO m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIU m Romanian
Romanian form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name meaning "golden" or "yellow-haired" from Latin flavus "yellow, golden". Flavius was the family name of the 1st-century Roman emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian. It was used as a personal name by several later emperors, notably by Constantine.
FLOYD m English
Variant of LLOYD.
FORREST m English
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie Forrest Gump (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.
FULVIA f Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
FÚLVIO m Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
FULVIO m Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Fulvius, which was derived from Latin fulvus "yellow, tawny".
FULVIUS m Ancient Roman
Latin form of FULVIO.
GARNET (1) f English
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GAURI f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "white" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess, another name of Parvati the wife of Shiva, so named because of her fair complexion.
GILROY m Irish, Scottish
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
GINGER f English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GLÁUCIA f Portuguese
Feminine form of GLÁUCIO.
GLAUCIA m & f Ancient Roman
Latin form of GLÁUCIO.
GLÁUCIO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of the Roman cognomen Glaucia, which was derived from Latin glaucus "bluish grey", ultimately from Greek.
GLAUCO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of GLAUCUS.
GLAUCUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Γλαῦκος (Glaukos), a name meaning "bluish grey". This was the name of a Greek sea god, as well as other characters in Greek legend.
GLAW m & f Welsh
Means "rain" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
GÖKÇE f Turkish
Means "blue" in Turkish.
GOL f Persian
Means "flower, rose" in Persian.
GOLNAR f Persian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and انار (anar) meaning "pomegranate".
GORMLAITH f Irish, Scottish
Derived from Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "princess, lady". This was the name of a wife of the 11th-century Irish ruler Brian Boru.
GRAY m & f English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GREY m & f English (Modern)
Variant of GRAY.
GRISELDA f English, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GRIZEL f Scottish
Scottish variant of GRISELDA.
GÜL f Turkish
Means "rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
GUL m & f Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
GULI f Uzbek
Uzbek form of GUL.
GÜLNUR f Turkish
Means "rose light" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
GWEN f Welsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.
GWENAËL m French, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and hael meaning "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
GWENAËLLE f French, Breton
Feminine form of GWENAËL.
GWENDA f Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 20th century.
GWENDAL m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and tal meaning "brow, forehead".
GWENDOLEN f Welsh
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
GWENFREWI f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and ffrewi meaning "reconciliation, peace". Saint Gwenffrewi or Winifred was a 7th-century Welsh martyr.
GWENLLIAN f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and probably lliain meaning "flaxen". This name was popular among medieval Welsh royalty. It was borne by the 14th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
GWENNEG m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Gwenneg was an 8th-century monk of Brittany.
GWYN m Welsh
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh.
GWYNFOR m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with mawr meaning "great, large".
GWYNN m Welsh
Variant of GWYN.
GYEONG-HUI f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour" and (hui) meaning "beauty". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
GYEONG-JA f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "congratulate, celebrate" or (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour" combined with (ja) meaning "child". This name can be formed of other hanja character combinations as well. Korean feminine names ending with the character (a fashionable name suffix in Japan, read as -ko in Japanese) became less popular after Japanese rule of Korea ended in 1945.
GYEONG-SUK f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city" and (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
HANA (3) f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana) both meaning "flower". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HANAKO f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) meaning "flower" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
HANEUL m & f Korean
Means "heaven, sky" in Korean.
HARI m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
HARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HARUKA f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
HARUKI m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HARUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
HARUNA f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "spring" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HAUKEA f Hawaiian
Means "white snow" from Hawaiian hau "snow" and kea "white".
HAZE f English (Rare)
Short form of HAZEL.
HAZEL f English
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HEDDWYN m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements hedd "peace" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
HEIRANI f Tahitian
From Tahitian hei "crown, garland" and rani "heaven, sky".
HEITIARE f Tahitian
From Tahitian hei "crown, garland" and tiare "flower".
HEMA f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Kannada
Means "golden" in Sanskrit.
HILAL m & f Arabic, Turkish
Means "crescent moon" in Arabic, also referring to the new moon on the Islamic calendar. As a given name it is typically masculine in Arabic and feminine in Turkish.
HINA f Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "light, sun, male" or (hi) meaning "sun, day" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HINATA f & m Japanese
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written using the hiragana writing system.
HIRA f & m Urdu, Nepali, Punjabi, Indian, Gujarati, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit हीर (hira) meaning "diamond". It is typically feminine in Pakistan and unisex in India and Nepal.