Names Categorized "fame"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fame.
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ADELMAR   m   Ancient Germanic, Portuguese (Brazilian)
From the Germanic elements adal "noble" and meri "famous".
ÆÐELMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of ADELMAR.
CLARA   f   Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
ELMAR   m   German
Descended from various Germanic names such as Agilmar, which was derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and meri "famous".
EUCLID   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Ευκλειδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and κλεος (kleos) "glory" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
INGEMAR   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Ingimárr, derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with mærr "famous".
KLYTIË   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτος (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
OTMAR   m   German, Czech (Rare), Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audamar, which was derived from the elements aud "wealth, fortune" and meri "famous". This was the name of an 8th-century Swiss saint, an abbot of Saint Gall.
PERICLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Περικλης (Perikles), which was derived from the Greek elements περι (peri) "around, exceedingly" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and general.
RAMIRO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ramirus, a Latinized form of a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements ragin "advice" and meri "famous". Saint Ramirus was a 6th-century prior of the Saint Claudius Monastery in Leon. He and several others were executed by the Arian Visigoths, who opposed orthodox Christianity. This name was subsequently borne by kings of León, Asturias and Aragon.
ROALD   m   Norwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990).
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
RODNEY   m   English
From a surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame"). It was first used as a given name in honour of the British admiral Lord Rodney (1719-1792).
WALDEMAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name VLADIMIR (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and meri "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
WEALDMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WILLAMAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and meri "famous".
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