Names Categorized "fertility deities"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fertility deities.
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AMONmEgyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Αμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian Ymn (reconstructed as Yamanu) which meant "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
ANAHITAfPersian, Persian Mythology
Means "immaculate, undefiled" from Avestan a "not" and ahit "unclean". This was the name of the Persian goddess of fertility and water. She was sometimes identified with Artemis, Aphrodite and Athena.
ANAT (1)fSemitic Mythology
Possibly derived from a Semitic root meaning "water spring". Anat was a goddess of fertility, hunting and war worshipped by the Semitic peoples of the Levant. She was the sister and consort of the god Hadad.
ASHERAHfSemitic Mythology
Perhaps derived from Semitic roots meaning "she who walks in the sea". This was the name of a Semitic mother goddess. She was worshipped by the Israelites before the advent of monotheism.
ASHTORETHfBiblical, Semitic Mythology
From עַשְׁתֹרֶת ('Ashtoret), the Hebrew form of the name of a Phoenician goddess of love, war and fertility. Her name is cognate to that of the East Semitic goddess ISHTAR.
BA'ALmSemitic Mythology, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Semitic ba'l meaning "lord, master, possessor". This was the title of various deities, often associated with storms and fertility, who were worshipped by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, and other peoples of the ancient Near East. It was particularly applied to the god Hadad.
BACCHUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Βακχος (Bakchos), derived from ιαχο (iacho) meaning "to shout". This was another name of the Greek god Dionysos, and it was also the name that the Romans commonly used for him.
BASTfEgyptian Mythology
Possibly means "fire, heat" or "ointment jar" in Egyptian. In Egyptian mythology Bast was a goddess of cats, fertility and the sun who was considered a protector of Lower Egypt. She was often depicted with the head of a lioness or a house cat. As her role in the Egyptian pantheon diminished, she was called Bastet.
BASTETfEgyptian Mythology
Variant of BAST. This form of the name, a diminutive, was given to her after the similar goddess Sekhmet (protector of Upper Egypt) became more important.
BÉBINNfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "fair lady" in Irish Gaelic. This name was borne by several characters in Irish mythology, including a goddess of childbirth.
CERNUNNOSmCeltic Mythology (Latinized)
Means "horned" in Celtic. This was the name of the Celtic god fertility, animals, wealth, and the underworld. He was usually depicted having antlers, and was identified with the Roman god Mercury.
CYBELEfNear Eastern Mythology (Hellenized)
Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian mother goddess associated with fertility and nature. She was later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.
DALIA (2)fLithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Means "fate, luck" in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of weaving, fate and childbirth, often associated with Laima.
DIANAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DIONYSOSmGreek Mythology
From Greek Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" combined with NYSA, the name of the region where young Dionysos was said to have been raised. In Greek mythology Dionysos was the god of wine, revelry, fertility and dance. He was the son of Zeus and Semele.
FAUNAfRoman Mythology
Feminine form of FAUNUS. Fauna was a Roman goddess of fertility, women and healing, a daughter and companion of Faunus.
FLORAfEnglish, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FREYRmNorse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "lord" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr presided over fertility, sunlight and rain, and was the husband of the frost giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he was one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
FRIGGfNorse Mythology
Means "beloved" in Old Norse, ultimately derived from Indo-European *pri "to love". In Norse mythology she was the goddess of the earth, air and fertility, and the wife of Odin. Some scholars believe that she and the goddess Freya share a common origin.
GERD (2)fSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd was a fertility goddess, a frost giantess who was the wife of Freyr.
INANNAfSumerian Mythology
Possibly derived from Sumerian nin-an-a(k) meaning "lady of the heavens", from 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and the genitive form of 𒀭 (an) meaning "heaven, sky". Inanna was the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility and war. She descended into the underworld where the ruler of that place, her sister Ereshkigal, had her killed. The god Enki interceded, and Inanna was allowed to leave the underworld as long as her husband Dumuzi took her place.... [more]
INGmGermanic Mythology
From the Germanic *Ingwaz, possibly meaning "ancestor". This was the name of an obscure old Germanic fertility god who was considered the ancestor of the tribe the Ingaevones. It is possible he was an earlier incarnation of the god Freyr.
ISHTARfSemitic Mythology
Meaning unknown. Ishtar was an Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess who presided over love, war and fertility. She was cognate with the Canaanite and Phoenician Ashtoreth, and she was also identified with the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
IXCHELfMayan Mythology, Native American, Mayan
Means "rainbow lady" in Mayan. Ixchel was the Maya goddess of the earth, the moon, and medicine. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.
KAMAKSHIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit काम (kama) meaning "love, desire" and अक्षि (akshi) meaning "eye". This is the name of a Hindu fertility goddess. She is considered to be an incarnation of Parvati.
LAIMAfLithuanian, Latvian, Baltic Mythology
From Latvian laime and Lithuanian laima which mean "luck, fate". This was the name of the Latvian and Lithuanian goddess of fate, luck, pregnancy and childbirth. She was the sister of the goddesses Dekla and Karta, who were also associated with fate.
LIBERmRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin liber meaning "free". This was the name of a Roman fertility god, often identified with Dionysus.
LUCINAfRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.
MARDUKmSemitic Mythology
Probably from Sumerian amar-Utuk meaning "calf of Utu", derived from amar combined with the name of the sun god UTU. This was the name of the chief Babylonian god, presiding over heaven, light, sky, battle, and fertility. After killing the dragon Tiamat, who was an old enemy of the gods, he created the world and sky from the pieces of her body.
MARI (3)fMythology
Possibly from Basque emari "donation" or amari "mother". This was the name of a goddess of the weather and fertility in Basque mythology.
NERTHUSfGermanic Mythology
Latinized form of Nerþuz, the Germanic (feminine) equivalent of Njörðr (see NJORD). Nerthus was a Germanic goddess of fertility as described by the Roman historian Tacitus in the 1st century.
NINHURSAGfSumerian Mythology
Means "lady of the mountain", from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and 𒉺𒂅 (hursaĝ) meaning "mountain". This was the name of the Sumerian mother and fertility goddess, the primary consort of Enki.
NJORDmNorse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old Norse Njörðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigourous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
NONA (1)fRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin nonus meaning "ninth", referring to the nine months of pregnancy. This was the name of a Roman goddess of pregnancy. She was also one of the three Fates (or Parcae).
PERSEPHONEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
RHIANNONfWelsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
TANITHfSemitic Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
TLALOCmAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "of the earth" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of rain and fertility, the husband of Chalchiuhticue.
XOCHIQUETZALfAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "flower feather" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec goddess of love, flowers and the earth, the twin sister of Xochipilli.
ŽIVAfSlavic Mythology, Slovene
Means "living, alive" in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic goddess associated with life, fertility and spring.