Names Categorized "game of thrones characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include game of thrones characters.
Filter Results       more options...
AERON (1)m & fWelsh
Either derived from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of a river in Wales.
ALTONmEnglish
From an Old English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river".
ALYSfEnglish
Variant of ALICE.
ANYAfRussian
Russian diminutive of ANNA.
ARTHURmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ARYAm & fPersian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
BIANCAfItalian, Romanian
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).
BRAN (1)mIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRANDONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of BRENDAN.
DAENERYSfLiterature
Created by author George R. R. Martin for a character in his series 'A Song of Ice and Fire', first published 1996, and the television adaption 'Game of Thrones' (2011-). An explanation for the meaning of her name is not provided, though it is presumably intended to be of Valyrian origin. In the series Daenerys Targaryen is a queen of the Dothraki and a claimant to the throne of Westeros.
DAISYfEnglish
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
DENYSmUkrainian
Ukrainian form of DENIS.
DORANmIrish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Deoráin meaning "descendant of Deoradhán". The name Deoradhán means "exile, wanderer" in Gaelic.
DROGOmEnglish (Archaic)
Norman name, possibly derived from Gothic dragen "to carry" or Saxon drog "ghost". Alternatively, it could be from the Slavic element dragu "precious, dear". The Normans introduced this name to England.
ELIAmItalian, Dutch
Italian and Dutch form of ELIJAH.
FRANCESfEnglish
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.
GREGORmGerman, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GREYm & fEnglish (Modern)
Variant of GRAY.
HARALDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Scandinavian and German cognate of HAROLD. This was the name of several kings of Norway and Denmark.
HUGHmEnglish
From the Germanic element hug, meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty. The Normans brought the name to England and it became common there, even more so after the time of the 12th-century bishop Saint Hugh of Lincoln, who was known for his charity. This was also the name of kings of Cyprus and the crusader kingdom of Jerusalem. The name is used in Ireland and Scotland as the Anglicized form of Aodh and Ùisdean.
JAIME (2)fEnglish
Variant of JAMIE. The character Jaime Sommers from the television series 'The Bionic Woman' (1976-1978) helped to popularize the name. It can sometimes be given in reference to the French phrase j'aime meaning "I love", though it is pronounced differently.
JOFFREYmFrench
French variant form of GEOFFREY.
JOHNNAfEnglish
Feminine form of JOHN.
JON (2)mEnglish
Short form of JONATHAN, or sometimes a variant of JOHN.
JORYmCornish
Cornish form of GEORGE.
KARLmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KAYLAfEnglish
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix la. Use of the name was greatly increased in the 1980s after the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera 'Days of Our Lives'.
KEVANmIrish
Variant of KEVIN.
KITTYfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
LEOmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LOTHARmGerman, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
MARTYNmWelsh, Ukrainian
Welsh and Ukrainian form of MARTIN.
MAYNARDmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name MEGINHARD.
MEERAfIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada
Variant transcription of MIRA (1).
MORAGfScottish
Diminutive of MÓR.
MORGAN (1)m & fWelsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
NANfEnglish
Originally a diminutive of ANN. It may have originated with the affectionate phrase mine Ann, which was later reinterpreted as my Nan. It is now also used as a short form of NANCY.
NEDmEnglish
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
ORNELLAfItalian
Created by the Italian author Gabriele d'Annunzio for his novel 'La Figlia di Jorio' (1904). It is derived from Tuscan Italian ornello meaning "flowering ash tree".
RAYmEnglish
Short form of RAYMOND, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
ROBERTmEnglish, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROBINm & fEnglish, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROSfEnglish
Short form of ROSALIND, ROSAMUND, and other names beginning with Ros.
SAM (1)m & fEnglish
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SHAEfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of SHEA.
SHIREENfPersian
Variant transcription of SHIRIN.
SISSYfEnglish
Diminutive of CECILIA, FRANCES or PRISCILLA. It can also be taken from the nickname, which originated as a nursery form of the word sister.
SUMMERfEnglish
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
TYCHOmDanish, Dutch
Latinized form of TYGE. This name was borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).
WALTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WILLmEnglish
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLEMmDutch
Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.