Missy's Personal Name List

ADAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-DER
Personal note: Masculine usage only. 04.04.07
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.

ADAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-dəm (English), A-DAHN (French), A-dam (German, Polish, Arabic), A-dahm (Dutch), u-DAM (Russian), ah-DAHM (Ukrainian)
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ADELIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English, Old Swedish
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Medieval English and Old Swedish form of Adelais. The second wife of Henry I of England bore this name.

ALESSIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Italian form of ALEXIS.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALLEGRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LEG-rə (English), al-LE-gra (Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.

ALOJZY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: a-LOI-zi
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Polish form of ALOYSIUS.

ALOYSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ah-LOI-zee-ah
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Aloysius.

ALOYSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ə-WISH-əs
Personal note: Not sure why but there is something about this name I like though I would probably only use it as a middle name,
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.

ANDREW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo (English)
Personal note: Simple but strong, Moving up on my favourite list. Family name too.
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
English form of the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανδρειος (andreios) "manly, masculine", a derivative of ανηρ (aner) "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.

This name has been common (in various spellings) throughout the Christian world, and it became very popular in the Middle Ages. Saint Andrew is regarded as the patron of Scotland, Russia, Greece and Romania. The name has been borne by three kings of Hungary, American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), and, more recently, English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-).

ANNIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHN-nee-kah (Swedish, Dutch, Finnish), A-nee-ka (German), AN-i-kə (English), AHN-i-kə (English)
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.

ANSELME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-SELM
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
French form of ANSELM.

ANTOINETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-TWA-NET
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Feminine diminutive of ANTOINE. This name was borne by Marie Antoinette, the queen of France during the French Revolution. She was executed by guillotine.

ANTONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Polish, Romanian, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνια (Greek)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya (Italian, Spanish, German), an-TO-nee-ə (English), ahn-TO-nee-ah (Dutch), an-TAW-nya (Polish)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).

ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Personal note: Favourite Russian name.
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Russian diminutive of ANNA.

ARSINOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Spanish (Latin American), Italian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Ἀρσινόη
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Derived from Greek arsis "to rise, to lift" combined with Greek nous "mind, intellect". This name was borne by a princess from the Ptolemaic dynasty of ancient Egypt.

ARSINOË
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Pronounced: ar-SIN-oh-ay
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Traditional spelling of Arsinoe.

ASTRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AH-strid (Swedish), AH-stree (Norwegian), AS-trit (German), AS-TREED (French)
Personal note: Pretty sounding. Heard it first in a Sherrilyn Kenyon novel.
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.

AUBREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-bree
Personal note: For masculine use only. 04.04.07
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song 'Aubrey' along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.

AUDREY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-dree
Personal note: Classic, old fashioned.
Rating: 78% based on 5 votes
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AUGUSTE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-GUYST
Personal note: More likely as a middle name only. 05.04.07
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
French form of AUGUSTUS.

AUGUSTINE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-gə-steen, aw-GUS-tin
Personal note: Prefer for female usage. 04.04.07
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.

BASIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: BA-sha
Personal note: Bah-sha
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Polish diminutive of BARBARA.

BEAUREGARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO-rə-gahrd
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a French surname meaning "beautiful outlook".

BENNETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-ət
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Medieval form of BENEDICT. This was the more common spelling in England until the 18th century. Modern use of the name is probably also influenced by the common surname Bennett, itself a derivative of the medieval name.

BRIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 14% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of BRÍD.

BRODY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRO-dee
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.

BRONTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRAHN-tee
Personal note: Like as a middle name for a girl 05.06.10
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντη meaning "thunder".

CADE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAYD
Personal note: Cade Everett
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
From a surname which was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.

CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb (English)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALLUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-um
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Variant of CALUM.

CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE (French), kə-MEEL (English)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.

CARYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: KAHR-is
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.

CELESTINE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEL-əs-teen
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.

CHARLES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHRLZ (English), SHARL (French)
Personal note: Nickname Charlie 04.04.07
Rating: 80% based on 5 votes
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. His grandfather Charles Martel had also been a noted leader of the Franks. It was subsequently the name of several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary (in various spellings). After Charlemagne, his name was adopted as a word meaning "king" in many Eastern European languages, for example Czech král, Hungarian király, Russian король (korol), and Turkish kral.

The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was borne by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.

CHASE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAYS
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.

CHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χλοη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLO-ee (English)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

CIARÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Personal note: Prefer it spelt Cieran. Favourite boy name on 04.18.07. Changed as of 10.12.09
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

CLARICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: klə-REES
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.

CORBIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-bin
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).

CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.

COSIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAW-zee-mo, KO-zee-mo
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Italian variant of COSMAS. A famous bearer was Cosimo de' Medici, the 15th-century founder of Medici rule in Florence, who was a patron of the Renaissance and a successful merchant. Other members of the Medici family have also borne this name.

DAGNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: DAHNG-nuy (Swedish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and "new".

DANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYN
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
From an English surname which was either a variant of the surname DEAN or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.

DANTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DAN-te
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Medieval short form of DURANTE. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the 'Divine Comedy'.

DANUTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: da-NOO-ta
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Polish form of DANUTĖ.

DARBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-bee
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.

DARCY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).

DEVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEV-in
Personal note: Masculine usage only. 04.04.07
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).

DIVYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam
Other Scripts: दिव्या (Hindi, Marathi), ದಿವ್ಯಾ (Kannada), திவ்யா (Tamil), దివ్యా (Telugu), ദിവ്യ (Malayalam)
Personal note: div-ee-uh
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "divine, heavenly" in Sanskrit.

DOMINIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWM-i-nik
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.

DRAKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DRAYK
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".

DUNCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUN-kən (English)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).

EDGAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ED-gər (English), ED-GAR (French)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).

EDYTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: e-DI-ta
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Polish form of EDITH.

ELISABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: e-LEE-za-bet (German), e-LEE-sah-bet (Danish), i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)
Rating: 76% based on 5 votes
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.

ELISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: e-LEE-zə (German), e-LEE-se (Norwegian, Danish, Swedish), i-LEES (English), i-LEEZ (English)
Personal note: Middle name only. 04.04.07
Rating: 77% based on 6 votes
Short form of ELIZABETH.

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth (English)
Rating: 96% based on 5 votes
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. It has also been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ESMÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EZ-may (English), EZ-mee (English), es-MAY (Dutch)
Personal note: Middle name only. 04.04.07
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.

FAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Personal note: Middle name only. 04.04.07
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy", ultimately (via Old French) from Latin fata meaning "the Fates". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In some cases it may be used as a short form of FAITH.

FORTUNATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of FORTUNATO.

FRANÇOIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FRAHN-SWA
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
French form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). François Villon was a French lyric poet of the 15th century. This was also the name of two kings of France.

GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEL (French), ga-BRYEL (Spanish), GA-bree-el (German, Classical Latin), GAHB-ree-el (Finnish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAB-ryel (Polish)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) "strong man, hero" and אֶל ('El) "God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GEORGIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jor-JYAH-nə (English), jor-JAY-nə (English)
Personal note: Jor-jee-an-uh
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.

GIEDRĖ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of GIEDRIUS.

GILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL-ee-ən, GIL-ee-ən
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.

GIOVANNI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-VAN-nee
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516) and the painter and sculptor Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) were two famous bearers of this name.

GRADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-dee (English)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.

GREYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Variant of GRAYSON.

HENRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Finnish
Pronounced: AHN-REE (French), HEN-ree (Finnish)
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
French form of HENRY.

IAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən (English)
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
Scottish form of JOHN.

ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Pronounced: ee-sa-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), EE-ZA-BEL (French), ee-za-BEL (German)
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ITALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
From the Italian name of the country of Italy, Italia (see ITALUS).

JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JACKSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-sən
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).

JAMES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Rating: 74% based on 7 votes
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JERICHO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יְרֵחוֹ (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JER-i-ko (English)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
From the name of a city in Israel which is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".

JERZY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: YE-zhi
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Polish form of GEORGE.

JOSIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jo-SIE-ə (English)
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
From the Hebrew name יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Yoshiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH supports". In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo in the 7th century BC. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

JUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHUYS-TEEN (French), jus-TEEN (English)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.

KATERI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
From the Mohawk pronunciation of KATHERINE. This was the name adopted by the 17th-century Mohawk woman Tekakwitha upon her baptism. She has been beatified by the Catholic Church.

KATHERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin
Rating: 77% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αικια (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρος (katharos) "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.

The name was borne by a semi-legendary 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on a spiked wheel. The saint was initially venerated in Syria, and returning crusaders introduced the name to Western Europe. It has been common in England since the 12th century in many different spellings, with Katherine and Catherine becoming standard in the later Middle Ages.

Famous bearers of the name include Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic, and Catherine de' Medici, a 16th-century French queen. It was also borne by three of Henry VIII's wives, including Katherine of Aragon, and by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great.

KATYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Катя (Russian)
Pronounced: KA-tyə
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of YEKATERINA.

KAZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: KA-zha
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Short form of KAZIMIERA.

KELTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Canadian)
Pronounced: KEL-tee
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From the Scottish surname Keltie, which was a variant of Kelty. It coincides with a vernacular term for the kittiwake (a type of small seagull) used around Aberdeen in Scotland. This name has been in use since the 19th century.

KILLIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Anglicized variant of CILLIAN, also used in France.

LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LE-o (German, Danish, Finnish), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: LEE-əm (English)
Rating: 83% based on 7 votes
Irish short form of WILLIAM.

LOCHLANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Irish form of LACHLAN.

LORELEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie (English)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.

LORRAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-RAYN
Personal note: Like the French association.
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.

LOVISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: loo-VEE-sah
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Swedish feminine form of LOUIS.

LUCIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan (Romanian), LOO-shən (English)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.

LUCIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEN
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
French form of LUCIANUS.

LUCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-see
Rating: 85% based on 6 votes
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: LOOK (English)
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
English form of the Greek name Λουκας (Loukas) which meant "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.

Due to his renown, the name became common in the Christian world (in various spellings). As an English name, Luke has been in use since the 12th century alongside the Latin form Lucas. A famous fictional bearer was the hero Luke Skywalker from the 'Star Wars' movies, beginning in 1977.

MAGNUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: MAHNG-nus (Swedish), MAHNG-noos (Norwegian), MAG-nəs (English)
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Late Latin name meaning "great". It was borne by a 7th-century saint who was a missionary in Germany. It became popular in Scandinavia after the time of the 11th-century Norwegian king Magnus I, who was said to have been named after Charlemagne, or Carolus Magnus in Latin (however there was also a Norse name Magni). The name was borne by six subsequent kings of Norway as well as three kings of Sweden. It was imported to Scotland and Ireland during the Middle Ages.

MAISIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MAY-zee
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of MAIREAD.

MALACHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MARGUERITE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GU-REET
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
French form of MARGARET. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).

MARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρινα (Greek), Марина (Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), მარინა (Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na (Italian, Spanish, German), mə-REEN-ə (English), mu-RYEE-nə (Russian)
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of MARINUS.

MARISKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Dutch
Pronounced: mah-RIS-kah (Dutch)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of MARIA.

MAURO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: MOW-ro (Italian)
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Italian form of MAURUS.

MAVERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAV-ə-rik
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Derived from the English word maverick meaning "independent". The word itself is derived from the surname of a 19th-century Texas rancher who did not brand his calves.

MAYTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Personal note: Mia-Tay
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Variant of MAITE (1).

MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).

MEREDITH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MER-ə-dith (English)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).

MERRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MER-ik
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
From a surname which was originally derived from the Welsh given name MEURIG.

MICAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə (English)
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.

MIMSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: Mimsy

MISHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Миша (Russian)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Russian diminutive of MIKHAIL.

MOIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MOI-ra
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.

MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.

MORANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slavic Mythology, Croatian
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a Slavic root meaning "death, plague". In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death.

MORDECAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי (Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAWR-də-kie (English)
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Means "servant of MARDUK" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.

MORGAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Variant of MORGAN (2), from a French form.

MORGANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).

MORGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Personal note: Top female name. 04.04.07
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Earlier form of MORGAN (2).

MORNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.

MZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: მზია (Georgian)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Derived from Georgian მზე (mze) "sun".

NATASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Наташа (Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-shə (Russian), nə-TAHSH-ə (English)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.

NICHOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Rating: 70% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NICOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NEE-KAW-LA
Personal note: Family name.
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
French form of NICHOLAS.

NICOLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: nee-ko-LEE-na
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
Feminine diminutive of NICOLA (1).

NIKOLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай (Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE (Russian)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Variant transcription of NIKOLAY.

NIKOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, English
Other Scripts: Νικολας (Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
Variant of NIKOLAOS or NICHOLAS.

NOELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: no-EL
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
English form of NOËLLE.

OCTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: awk-TAY-vee-ə (English), ok-TA-bya (Spanish), ok-TA-wee-a (Classical Latin)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)
Rating: 82% based on 6 votes
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

PALOMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pa-LO-ma
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.

PANDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδωρα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA (Classical Greek), pan-DAWR-ə (English)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.

PIERRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Swedish
Pronounced: PYER (French)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
French form of PETER. This name was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and by Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

RORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.

RUKSANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: رکسانا (Persian)
Pronounced: ruk-SA-na
Cognate of ROXANA.

RYLAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From the traditionally English surname meaning "rye land". From the Old English ryġe and land.

SALOME
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: სალომე (Georgian), Σαλωμη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-LO-mee (English), SAH-lə-may (English)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
From an Aramaic name which was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.

As a Christian given name, Salome has been in occasional use since the Protestant Reformation. This was due to a second person of this name in the New Testament: one of the women who witnessed the crucifixion and later discovered that Jesus' tomb was empty. It is used in Georgia due to the 4th-century Salome of Ujarma, who is considered a saint in the Georgian Church.

SALOMÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: SA-LAW-ME (French), sə-loo-ME (Portuguese)
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of SALOME.

SAPPHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Σαπφειρη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə (English)
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Σαπφειρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.

SASHA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Other Scripts: Саша (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: SA-SHA (French)
Personal note: Like as a nickname for Alexander. Not as common as Alex.
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.

SASKIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a: (Dutch), ZAS-kya (German)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From the Germanic element Sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".

SEBASTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
Pronounced: ze-BAS-tyan (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAS-tyan (Polish), SE-bahs-tee-ahn (Finnish)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SETH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת (Ancient Hebrew), Σηθ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH (English)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

SPENCER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEN-sər
From a surname which meant "dispenser of provisions" in Middle English. A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).

THEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: THEE-o (English), TAY-o (Dutch)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Short form of THEODORE, THEOBALD, and other names that begin with Theo.

TORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.

TOVAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טוֹבָה (Hebrew)
Rating: 18% based on 6 votes
Variant transcription of TOVA (1).

VALENTINE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAL-ən-tien
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.

WILHELMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: vil-hel-MEE-nah (Dutch), vil-hel-MEE-na (German)
Dutch and German feminine form of WILHELM. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).

WOJCIECH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: VOI-chekh
Personal note: Like the sound of it.
Rating: 22% based on 6 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements voji "soldier" and tekha "solace, comfort, joy". Saint Wojciech (also known by the Czech form of his name Vojtěch or his adopted name Adalbert) was a Bohemian missionary to Hungary, Poland and Prussia, where he was martyred.

WYATT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-ət
Personal note: Has a cowboy feel.
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.

ZILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
German diminutive of CECILIA.

ZILLAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צִלָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIL-ə (English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "shade" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the second wife of Lamech.

ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee (English), DZO-e (Italian)
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).

ZOIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Pronounced: ZOY-uh (Russian)
Variant transcription of Zoya.

ZORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".

ZOYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Зоя (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ZO-yə (Russian)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of ZOE.
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.