Names Categorized "fame"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fame.
gender
usage
Adelmar m Ancient Germanic, Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
From the Germanic elements adal "noble" and mari "famous".
Æðelmær m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of Adelmar.
Amaro m Galician, Portuguese, Spanish
Possibly from the Germanic name Adelmar, maybe influenced by Latin amarus "bitter". This was the name of a legendary saint who was said to have sailed across the Atlantic to a paradise. He is especially popular in Galicia and Asturias in Spain.
Androcles m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀνδροκλῆς (Androkles) meaning "glory of a man", derived from ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a man who pulled a thorn from a lion's paw in one of Aesop's fables.
Aylmer m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was a variant of Elmer.
Bertha f German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
Bogomir m Slovene
Slovene form of Bohumír.
Bohumír m Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic element bogu "god" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
Čestmír m Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements chisti "honour" and meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
Chlodulf m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Ludolf.
Chlotichilda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Clotilde.
Clara f German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares.... [more]
Clarice f English
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of Clara.
Clarisa f Spanish
Spanish form of Clarissa.
Clarissa f English, Italian
Latinate form of Clarice. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
Claritia f Late Roman
Possibly a derivative of Clara.
Clotilda f English
English form of Clotilde.
Clotilde f French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda, which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
Clytemnestra f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κλυταιμνήστρα (Klytaimnestra), from κλυτός (klytos) meaning "famous, noble" and μνηστήρ (mnester) meaning "courter, wooer". In Greek legend Clytemnestra was the wife of Agamemnon and the mother of Orestes and Electra. While her husband was away during the Trojan War she took a lover, and upon his return she had him murdered. She was subsequently killed by Orestes.
Cuthberht m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Cuthbert.
Cuthbert m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
Cynemær m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and mær "famous".
Desislav m Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from Slavic elements, possibly deseti meaning "ten", combined with slava "glory".
Dietmar m German
Means "famous people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and mari "famous".
Elmar m German
Descended from various Germanic names such as Agilmar, which was derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and mari "famous".
Elmer m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old English name Æðelmær. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
Euclid m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Εὐκλείδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory" with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
Fridumar m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and mari "famous".
Guiomar f & m Portuguese, Spanish, Arthurian Romance
Possibly derived from the Germanic name Wigmar, which is formed of the elements wig "war, battle" and mari "famous". In the medieval Lancelot-Grail Cycle he plays a minor role as a cousin of Guinevere, who banishes him after he becomes a lover of Morgan le Fey. In modern Portugal and Spain it is a feminine name.
Hróarr m Old Norse
Old Norse name, derived from the element hróðr "fame" combined with either geirr "spear" (making it a relation of Hróðgeirr), arr "warrior" or varr "vigilant, cautious". This is the name of a legendary Danish king, the same one who is featured in the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf with the name Hroðgar.
Hrodohaidis f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Rose.
Hrodulf m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Rudolf.
Hrolf m Ancient Germanic
Contracted form of Hrodulf.
Hrólfr m Old Norse
Contracted form of Hróðólfr.
Hróðólfr m Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Hrodulf (see Rudolf).
Hroðulf m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). This name appears in Beowulf belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
Hrotsuitha f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Roswitha.
Hruodnand m Ancient Germanic
Possible Germanic form of Roland.
Ingemar m Swedish
From the Old Norse name Ingimárr, derived from the name of the Germanic god Ing combined with mærr "famous".
Jalal m Arabic, Persian
Means "greatness" in Arabic.
Jochebed f Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹכֶבֶד (Yokheved) meaning "Yahweh is glory". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother of Miriam, Aaron and Moses.
Kaulana m & f Hawaiian
Means "famous" in Hawaiian.
Kleio f Greek Mythology, Greek
Derived from Greek κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of history and heroic poetry, one of the nine Muses. She was said to have introduced the alphabet to Greece.
Kleitos m Ancient Greek
Means "splendid, famous" in Greek. This was the name of one of the generals of Alexander the Great. He was killed by Alexander in a dispute.
Klotild f Hungarian (Rare)
Hungarian form of Clotilde.
Klytië f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτός (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
Lothar m German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
Ludolf m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hludwolf, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wulf "wolf".
Mærwine m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements mær "famous" and wine "friend".
Marva f English
Feminine form of Marvin.
Marvin m English, German
From an English surname that was derived from the Welsh given name Merfyn or the Old English name Mærwine. As an American given name, it steadily rose in popularity through the beginnings of the 20th century and peaked in the early 1930s (closely mirroring the similar-sounding but unrelated name Melvin). A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
Marwin m German (Rare)
German variant of Marvin.
Merfyn m Welsh
From an Old Welsh name (recorded variously as Mermin, Merhin or Merwin), of uncertain meaning. It is possibly from mer "bone marrow" or mor "sea" with the second element possibly mynawg "eminent, noble", mynnu "wish, desire" or myn "young goat, kid". This was the name of a 9th-century king of Gwynedd, Merfyn Frych.
Mervin m English
Variant of Mervyn or Marvin.
Mervyn m Welsh, English
Welsh variant of Merfyn, as well as the usual Anglicized form.
Orlanda f Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of Orlando.
Orlando m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian form of Roland, as used in the epic poems Orlando Innamorato (1483) by Matteo Maria Boiardo and Orlando Furioso (1532) by Ludovico Ariosto. A character in Shakespeare's play As You like It (1599) also bears this name, as does a city in Florida.
Otmar m German, Czech, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audamar, which was derived from the elements aud "wealth, fortune" and mari "famous". This was the name of an 8th-century Swiss saint, an abbot of Saint Gall.
Pericles m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Περικλῆς (Perikles), which was derived from the Greek elements περί (peri) meaning "around, exceedingly" and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and general.
Radimir m Russian (Rare)
Russian variant form of Radomir.
Radmir m Russian
Russian form of Radomir.
Radomír m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of Radomir.
Radomir m Serbian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
Radomíra f Czech
Czech feminine form of Radomir.
Radomira f Serbian
Feminine form of Radomir.
Raginmar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Ramiro.
Ramiro m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ramirus, a Latinized form of a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements ragin "advice" and mari "famous". Saint Ramirus was a 6th-century prior of the Saint Claudius Monastery in Leon. He and several others were executed by the Arian Visigoths, who opposed orthodox Christianity. This name was subsequently borne by kings of León, Asturias and Aragon.
Ramirus m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Raginmar (see Ramiro).
Rhonwen f Welsh
Welsh form of Rowena, appearing in medieval Welsh poems and stories as a personification of the English people.
Roald m Norwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen (1872-1928) and the British children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990), who was born to Norwegian parents.
Robert m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).... [more]
Rodney m English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame"). It was first used as a given name in honour of the British admiral Lord Rodney (1719-1792).
Rodolfito m Spanish (Rare)
Spanish diminutive of Rodolfo.
Rodolfo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Rudolf. This is the name of the hero in Puccini's opera La Bohème (1896).
Rodolphe m French
French form of Rudolf.
Roelof m Dutch
Dutch form of Rudolf.
Rohese f Medieval English
Norman French form of Hrodohaidis.
Rohesia f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see Rose).
Roland m English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Georgian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic La Chanson de Roland, in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
Rolande f French
French feminine form of Roland.
Rolando m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Roland.
Rolf m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
Rollo m English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of Rolf. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
Romilda f Italian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
Romuald m French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements hrom meaning "fame" and wald meaning "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century Italian saint who founded the Camaldolese order.
Romualda f Lithuanian, Polish
Feminine form of Romuald.
Romualdas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Romuald.
Romualdo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Romuald.
Romualds m Latvian
Latvian form of Romuald.
Roparzh m Breton
Breton form of Robert.
Rose f English, French
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Rosenda f Spanish
Feminine form of Rosendo.
Rosendo m Spanish
Spanish form of a Visigothic name composed of the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and sinths "path". This was the name of a 10th-century Galician saint, also known as Rudesind.
Roswitha f German
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinth "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems and dramas.
Roul m Medieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of Rolf.
Rowena f English
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wunn "joy, bliss". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. Alternatively, Geoffrey may have based it on a Welsh name. It was popularized by Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819).
Roza 2 f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic short form of feminine names beginning with the element hrod meaning "fame".
Rudesind m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Rosendo.
Rudolf m German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Dutch, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel The Prisoner of Zenda (1894).
Rūdolfs m Latvian
Latvian form of Rudolf.
Rudolph m English
English form of Rudolf, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
Rumhilt f Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of Romilda.
Şan m & f Turkish (Rare)
Means "fame, reputation" in Turkish.
Shuhrat m Uzbek, Tajik
From Persian شهرت (shohrat), derived from Arabic شهرة (shuhrah) meaning "fame, reputation".
Shukhrat m Uzbek
Variant of Shuhrat.
Siegmar m German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mari "famous".
Sigimar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Siegmar.
Slavomír m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of Sławomir.
Slavomir m Croatian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Croatian and Serbian form of Sławomir.
Slavomíra f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of Sławomir.
Sławomir m Polish
Derived from the Slavic element slava meaning "glory" combined with meru meaning "great, famous" or miru meaning "peace, world".
Sławomira f Polish
Polish feminine form of Sławomir.
Tammaro m Italian
Italian form of the Germanic name Thancmar, which was composed of the elements thank "thought" and mari "famous". This was the name of 5th-century saint, a bishop of Atella in Campania, Italy.
Theudemar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic (Frankish) form of Dietmar.
Vilmar m Swedish (Rare)
Scandinavian form of Willamar.
Vladimir m Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of a 9th-century ruler of Bulgaria. It was also borne by an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev, Vladimir the Great, who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm. Other notable bearers include the revolutionary and first leader of the Soviet state Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924), and the Russian president and prime minister Vladimir Putin (1952-).
Vladimira f Slovene, Croatian
Feminine form of Vladimir.
Voldemārs m Latvian
Latvian cognate of Waldemar.
Waldemar m German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name Vladimir (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and mari "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
Wealdmær m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
Wealhmær m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
Wigmar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form (possibly) of Guiomar.
Willamar m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and mari "famous".
Wilmǣr m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Willamar.
Wilmer m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Wilmǣr.
Xiomara f Spanish
Possibly a Spanish form of Guiomar.
Yash m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Gujarati, Kannada
Derived from Sanskrit यशस् (yashas) meaning "fame, praise, glory".