Names Categorized "nature"

This is a list of names in which the categories include nature.
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ABEBAfEastern African, Amharic
Means "flower" in Amharic.
ABILENEfEnglish
From a place name mentioned briefly in the New Testament. It is probably from Hebrew אָבֵל ('avel) meaning "meadow, grassy area". It has occasionally been used as a given name in modern times.
ACACIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".
ACANTHAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ακανθα (Akantha), which meant "thorn, prickle". In Greek legend she was a nymph loved by Apollo.
ADERYNfWelsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
ADHARAfAstronomy
Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.
ADI (1)f & mHebrew
Means "jewel" or "ornament" in Hebrew.
AELIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of AELIUS.
AELIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun". This was the family name of the Roman emperor Hadrian.
AERON (1)m & fWelsh
Either derived from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of a river in Wales.
AERONWENfWelsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
AERONWYfWelsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix wy meaning "river".
ÆSCmAnglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
AFANENfWelsh (Rare)
Means "raspberry" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AGHAVNIfArmenian
Means "dove" in Armenian.
AGRIPPAm & fAncient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from Greek αγριος (agrios) "wild" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" or possibly of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
AI (1)fJapanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
AINA (3)fJapanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens", as well as other character combinations.
AINSLEYf & mScottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
AIRIfJapanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKI (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
AKIKOfJapanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKIRAm & fJapanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
ÁKOSmHungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "white falcon". This was the name of a medieval Hungarian clan.
ALBENAfBulgarian
Created by Bulgarian writer Yordan Yovkov for the heroine in his drama 'Albena' (1930). He may have based it on ablen, the name of a type of peony (a flowering plant).
ALCIPPEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκιππη (Alkippe), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
ALCYONEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
ALENKAfSlovene
Slovene diminutive of ALENA.
ALKYONEfGreek Mythology
Original Greek form of ALCYONE.
ALLONmBiblical
Means "oak" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
ALMA (1)fEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALMASf & mArabic
Means "diamond" in Arabic, ultimately from Persian.
ALMASTfArmenian
Means "diamond" in Armenian, ultimately from Persian.
ALMOGm & fHebrew
Means "coral" in Hebrew.
ALON (1)mHebrew
Means "oak tree" in Hebrew.
ALONAfHebrew
Feminine form of ALON (1).
ALONDRAfSpanish
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
ALTAIRmAstronomy, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "the flyer" in Arabic. This is the name of a star in the constellation Aquila.
ALTANmTurkish
Means "red dawn" in Turkish.
ALTANSARNAIfMongolian
Means "golden rose" in Mongolian.
ALTANTSETSEGfMongolian
Means "golden flower" in Mongolian.
ALTONmEnglish
From an Old English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river".
ALTWIDUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Derived from the Germanic elements ald "old" and witu "forest".
ALUDRAfAstronomy
Derived from Arabic العذرا (al-'adhra) meaning "the maiden". This is the name of a star in the constellation Canis Major.
ALWYNmWelsh
From the name of the River Alwen in Wales.
ALYONAfRussian
Originally a Russian diminutive of YELENA. It is now used independently.
ALYSSAfEnglish
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
AMARANTAfSpanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.
AMARANTHAfVarious
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek αμαραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Αμαραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
AMARILISfSpanish
Spanish form of AMARYLLIS.
AMARYLLISfLiterature
Derived from Greek αμαρυσσω (amarysso) "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem 'Eclogues'. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
ÁMBARfSpanish
Spanish cognate of AMBER.
AMBERfEnglish, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMBRAfItalian
Italian cognate of AMBER.
AMBREfFrench
French cognate of AMBER.
AMETHYSTfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix α (a) and μεθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
AMIR (2)mHebrew
Means "treetop" in Hebrew.
AMIRA (2)fHebrew
Feminine form of AMIR (2).
ANAR (2)fKazakh
Variant of ANARA.
ANARAfKazakh, Kyrgyz
Means "pomegranate" in Kazakh and Kyrgyz, ultimately from Persian.
ANARGULfKazakh
Means "blooming pomegranate tree" in Kazakh.
ANDROMEDAfGreek Mythology
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος) combined with μεδομαι (medomai) "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
ANE (2)mFrisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANEMONEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the anemone flower, which derives from Greek ανεμος (anemos) "wind".
ANFISAfRussian
Russian form of the Greek name Ανθουσα (Anthousa), which was derived from Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower". This was the name of a 9th-century Byzantine saint.
ANISEfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the herb, also called aniseed.
ANKURmIndian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "sapling, sprout, shoot" in Sanskrit.
ANNAGÜLfTurkmen
Derived from Turkmen anna "Friday" and gül "flower, rose".
ANNE (2)mFrisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANTHEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ανθεια (Antheia), derived from ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.
ANTHOUSAfAncient Greek
Ancient Greek form of ANFISA.
ANTIMANmNative American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
ANTINANCOmNative American, Mapuche
Means "eagle of the sun" in Mapuche.
AOIf & mJapanese
From Japanese (aoi) meaning "hollyhock, althea" or an adjectival form of (ao) meaning "green, blue". Other kanji with the same reading can form this name as well.
APHRODITEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phoenician origin. Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty, identified with the Roman goddess Venus. She was the wife of Hephaestus and the mother of Eros, and she was often associated with the myrtle tree and doves. The Greeks connected her name with αφρος (aphros) "foam", resulting in the story that she was born from the foam of the sea. Many of her characteristics are based on the goddess known as Ashtoreth to the Phoenicians and Ishtar to the Mesopotamian Semitic peoples, and on the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
APRILfEnglish
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
AQISSIAQmNative American, Greenlandic
Means "ptarmigan" in Greenlandic (a ptarmigan is a type of bird which lives in cold regions).
AQUILAm & fBiblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which meant "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
ARABINDAmBengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of ARAVIND.
ARACHNEfGreek Mythology
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
ARANTXAfBasque
Diminutive of ARANTZAZU.
ARANTZAZUfBasque
From the name of a place near the Spanish town of Oñati where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Its name is derived from Basque arantza "thornbush".
ARAVINDmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit.
ARAVINDAmIndian, Kannada
Variant transcription of ARAVIND.
ARELImBiblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
AREVIGfArmenian
Variant transcription of AREVIK.
AREVIKfArmenian
Means "like the sun" in Armenian.
ARI (1)mHebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARI (2)mAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
ARIESmRoman Mythology
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
ARISTAfAstronomy
Means "ear of corn" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
ARLIEf & mEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "eagle wood" in Old English. This name can also be a diminutive of ARLENE.
ARNmEnglish
Short form of ARNOLD.
ARNBJÖRGfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
ARNOLDmEnglish, German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARTEMISIAfAncient Greek
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the seven wonders of the world. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
ARTHITmThai
Means "sun" in Thai, derived from the name of the Hindu god ADITYA.
ARVIDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
ASADmArabic, Urdu
Means "lion" in Arabic.
ÁSBJÖRNmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and björn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of OSBORN.
ASCELINmAncient Germanic
Derived from a diminutive of the Germanic element asc meaning "ash tree".
ASCOmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element asc meaning "ash tree".
ASHm & fEnglish
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEAfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEEfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEIGHfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASHLIEfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLYNfEnglish (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
ASHTONm & fEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASKmNorse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse askr "ash tree". In Norse mythology Ask and his wife Embla were the first humans created by the gods.
ASKRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of ASK.
ASPENfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word for the tree, derived from Old English æspe. It is also the name of a ski resort in Colorado.
ASSEmFrisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element asc meaning "ash tree" or ans meaning "god".
ASTORmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
ASWATHImIndian, Malayalam
From Sanskrit अशवत्थ (ashvattha) meaning "sacred fig tree".
AUCAMANmNative American, Mapuche
Means "wild condor" in Mapuche.
AUROBINDOmBengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of ARAVIND.
AVALONfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit which was often linked with paradise.
AVELINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.
AVISfEnglish
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AVTANDILmGeorgian, Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for his 12th-century epic 'The Knight in the Panther's Skin'. Rustaveli based it on Persian آفتاب (aftab) "sunshine" and دل (dil) "heart". In the poem Avtandil is a knight who is sent by Tinatin to search for the mysterious knight of the title.
AYAKAfJapanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour" combined with (ka) or (ka) which both mean "flower". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AYAMEfJapanese
From Japanese 菖蒲 (ayame) meaning "iris". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
AYELETfHebrew
Means "gazelle, hind". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
AYGÜLfTurkish
Means "moon rose" in Turkish.
AYLA (1)fHebrew
Variant transcription of ELAH.
AYNURfTurkish, Azerbaijani, Kazakh, Uyghur
Means "moon light" in Turkish, Azerbaijani, Kazakh and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning "moon" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
AYSELfTurkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon flood" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon" and sel "flood, stream".
AYSUfTurkish
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and su meaning "water".
AZALEAfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Greek αζαλεος (azaleos) "dry".
AZUCENAfSpanish
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
ĄŽUOLASmLithuanian
Means "oak tree" in Lithuanian.
AZURAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaboration of AZURE.
AZUREfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".
AZZURRAfItalian
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
BADRm & fArabic
Means "full moon" in Arabic.
BADRImGeorgian
Georgian form of BADR.
BAHARGÜLfTurkmen
Derived from Turkmen bahar meaning "spring" and gül meaning "flower, rose" (both roots ultimately of Persian origin).
BAHRAMmPersian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Verethragna meaning "victory over resistance". This was the name of a Zoroastrian god (one of the Amesha Spenta) associated with victory and war. This name was borne by several Sassanid emperors. It is also the Persian name for the planet Mars.
BAIm & fChinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
BẢOmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (bảo) meaning "protection, security".
BAOf & mChinese
From Chinese (bǎo) meaning "treasure, jewel, precious, rare", (bāo) meaning "praise, honour" or (bāo) meaning "bud" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are possible as well.
BARCLAYmScottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
BAŞAKfTurkish
Means "ear of wheat" in Turkish. This is also the Turkish name for the constellation Virgo.
BASIL (1)mEnglish
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BASTfEgyptian Mythology
Possibly means "fire, heat" or "ointment jar" in Egyptian. In Egyptian mythology Bast was a goddess of cats, fertility and the sun who was considered a protector of Lower Egypt. She was often depicted with the head of a lioness or a house cat. As her role in the Egyptian pantheon diminished, she was called Bastet.
BASTETfEgyptian Mythology
Variant of BAST. This form of the name, a diminutive, was given to her after the similar goddess Sekhmet (protector of Upper Egypt) became more important.
BAT-ERDENEmMongolian
Means "strong jewel" in Mongolian.
BAYARDmLiterature
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.
BEEfEnglish
Short form of BEATRIX and other names beginning with B.
BELLATRIXfAstronomy
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
BEN (2)mDutch
Short form of BERNHARD and other Germanic names beginning with the element bern meaning "bear".
BENTLEYmEnglish
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BEOWULFmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf'. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BERAHTHRABANmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM, using an extended form of the second element.
BERAHTHRAMmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BERTRAM.
BERMETfKyrgyz
Means "pearl" in Kyrgyz.
BERRY (2)fEnglish (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
BERTRAMmEnglish, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).
BERTRANDOmItalian
Italian form of BERTRAND.
BESSARIONmLate Greek
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Greek βησσα (bessa) "wooded valley". This was the name of a 5th-century Egyptian hermit who was a disciple of Saint Anthony the Great. It was later adopted by the scholar Basilios Bessarion (1403-1472), a Greek born in Byzantine Anatolia who became a Roman Catholic bishop.
BETELGEUSEmAstronomy
The name of the star that marks the right shoulder of the constellation Orion. It is derived from Arabic يد الجوزا (yad al-Jawza) meaning "the hand of Jawza". جوزا (Jawza) meaning "central one" was the old Arabic name for the constellation Orion (also for Gemini).
BETONYfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
BIBIGULfKazakh
Means "nightingale" in Kazakh.
BIJOUfVarious
Means "jewel" in French.
BILJANAfSerbian, Macedonian, Croatian
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from the South Slavic word биље (bilje) meaning "herb".
BILYANAfBulgarian
Bulgarian form of BILJANA.
BISERAfBulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the South Slavic word бисер (biser) "pearl" (ultimately of Arabic origin).
BISERKAfCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of BISERA.
BITUINfFilipino, Tagalog
Means "star" in Tagalog.
BJÖRKfIcelandic
Means "birch tree" in Icelandic.
BJÖRNmSwedish, Icelandic, German, Ancient Scandinavian
From an Old Norse byname meaning "bear".
BLAANIDfManx
Manx form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLAIRm & fScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BLÁITHÍNfIrish
Variant of BLÁTHNAT using a different diminutive suffix.
BLANIDfIrish
Anglicized form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLÁTHNATfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "little flower" from the Irish word blath "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but she was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.
BLEJANfCornish
Means "flower" in Cornish.
BLODEUWEDDfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "face of flowers" in Welsh. In a story in the Mabinogion, she is created out of flowers by Gwydion to be the wife of his nephew Lleu Llaw Gyffes. She is eventually changed into an owl for her infidelity.
BLODEUYNfWelsh
Means "flower" in Welsh.
BLODWENfWelsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
BLONGmHmong
Means "leaf" in Hmong.
BLOSSOMfEnglish
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
BLUMAfYiddish
Means "flower" in Yiddish.
BOGLÁRKAfHungarian
Means "buttercup" in Hungarian, derived from the archaic word boglár meaning "ornament".
BOLORMAAfMongolian
Means "crystal mother" in Mongolian.
BOPHAfKhmer
Means "flower" in Khmer, ultimately from Pali.
BORmSlovene
Short form of names containing bor, such as BORISLAV or BORIS. It is also a South Slavic word meaning "pine tree".
BORA (2)fAlbanian
Derived from Albanian borë meaning "snow".
BORISmBulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BORÓKAfHungarian
Means "juniper" in Hungarian.
BOTUMfKhmer
Means "lotus" in Khmer.
BRADÁNmAncient Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic meaning "salmon".
BRAN (1)mIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAN (2)mWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRANWENfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRENNUSmAncient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRENOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of BRENNUS.
BRIALLENfWelsh
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
BRIARm & fEnglish (Modern)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
BRISCOEmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "birch wood" in Old Norse.
BROOKm & fEnglish
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BRYONYfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) "to swell".
BUCKmEnglish
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
BUDmEnglish
Short form of BUDDY.
BUDURfArabic
Strictly feminine form of BADR.
BULANfIndonesian
Means "moon" (or "month") in Indonesian.
BUNNYfEnglish
Diminutive of BERENICE.
BURIMmAlbanian
Means "spring, well, water source" in Albanian.
CAILEANmScottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CALANTHEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CALANTHIAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CALFURAYfNative American, Mapuche
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
CALLAfEnglish
From the name of a type of lily. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CALLISTO (2)fGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
CALLUMmScottish
Variant of CALUM.
CALUMmScottish
Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAM (1)fVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cam) meaning "orange (fruit)".
CAMELIAfRomanian
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).
CAMELLIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CAPUCINEfFrench
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CARINA (1)fEnglish, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARMELfEnglish, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CARMELOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of CARMEL.
CARMENfSpanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CARPUSmBiblical, Biblical Latin
Latin form of the Greek name Καρπος (Karpos), which meant "fruit, profits". The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament in the second epistle of Timothy.
CASTORmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CEDARf & mEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κεδρος (kedros).
CELANDINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CELESTINEf & mEnglish
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CELINDAfEnglish (Rare)
Probably a blend of CELIA and LINDA. This is also the Spanish name for a variety of shrub with white flowers, known as sweet mock-orange in English (species Philadelphus coronarius).
CELYNmWelsh
Means "holly" in Welsh.
CEPHASmBiblical, Biblical Latin
Means "rock" in Aramaic. The apostle Simon was called Cephas by Jesus because he was to be the rock upon which the Christian church was to be built. In most versions of the New Testament Cephas is translated into Greek Πετρος (Petros) (in English Peter).
CERENfTurkish
Means "young gazelle" in Turkish.
CERISEfFrench
Means "cherry" in French.
CEVAHİRf & mTurkish
Turkish form of JAWAHIR.
CHALCHIUHTICUEfAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "jade skirt" in Nahuatl. She was the Aztec goddess of water and rivers, the wife of Tlaloc.
CHANm & fKhmer
Means "moon" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
CHANDANmIndian, Hindi, Bengali, Odia
Derived from Sanskrit चन्दन (chandana) meaning "sandalwood".
CHANDERmIndian, Hindi
Variant transcription of CHANDRA.
CHANDRAm & fHinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHANDRAKANTmIndian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
CHANNARYfKhmer
Means "moon-faced girl" from Khmer ចន្ទ (chan) "moon" and នារី (neari) "woman, girl".
CHÂUf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (châu) meaning "pearl, gem".
CHERRYfEnglish
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of CHARITY. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
CHESLEYmEnglish
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
CHIKA (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
CHLOEfEnglish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament. As an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
CHOfJapanese (Rare)
Variant transcription of CHOU.
CHOLPONfKyrgyz
Means "Venus (the planet)" in Kyrgyz.
CHOUfJapanese (Rare)
From Japanese (chou) meaning "butterfly".
CHOUKOfJapanese
From Japanese (chou) meaning "butterfly" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations can be possible.
CHRYSANTAfEnglish (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
CHRYSANTHIfGreek
Modern Greek feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CHRYSANTHOSmGreek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) "golden" combined with ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
CHRYSSAfGreek
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CICEROmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.
ĈIELAfEsperanto
Means "heavenly, from the sky" in Esperanto.
CLAYmEnglish
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLEMATISfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for a type of flowering vine, ultimately derived from Greek κλημα (klema) "twig, branch".
CLODAGHfIrish
From the name of a river in Tipperary, Ireland.
CLOVERfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COCHISEmNative American, Apache
From Apache chis meaning "oak, wood". This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Chiricahua Apache.
COLIN (1)mScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLMmIrish
Variant of COLUM.
COLMÁNmIrish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLOMBAfItalian
Italian feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBANOmItalian
Italian form of COLUMBANUS.
COLOMBEfFrench
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBINAfItalian
Italian feminine diminutive of COLUMBA. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
COLOMBOmItalian
Italian form of COLUMBA.
COLUMmIrish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.
COLUMBAm & fLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
COLUMBANmIrish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COLUMBANUSmLate Roman
This name can be viewed as a derivative of COLUMBA or a Latinized form of COLUMBAN, both derivations being approximately equivalent. This is the name of Saint Columban in Latin sources.
COLUMBINEfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of COLOMBINA, the pantomime character.
CONORmIrish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar, derived from Old Irish con "hound, dog, wolf" and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CONSUSmRoman Mythology
Possibly derived from Latin conserere meaning "to sow, to plant". Consus was a Roman god of the harvest and grain.
CORALfEnglish, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORALIEfFrench
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORBINmEnglish
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).