Frozten's Personal Name List

ADAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: A-dəm (English), a-DAWN (French), AH-dahm (German, Polish), AH:-dahm (Dutch), ah-DAHM (Russian, Ukrainian)

Rating: 59% based on 66 votes

This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make". According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until Adam ate a forbidden fruit given to him by Eve.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Personal note: 71%

Rating: 72% based on 137 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Personal note: 74%

Rating: 74% based on 137 votes

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

ALVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-vin

Rating: 34% based on 114 votes

From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname which was derived from the Old English names.

AMADEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs (English), ahm-ə-DEE-əs (English)

Rating: 50% based on 121 votes

Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.

AMELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə (English), ə-MEEL-yə (English), ah-ME-lyah (Italian), ah-ME-lee-ah (German)

Rating: 65% based on 122 votes

Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

AMELIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: AH-me-lee, ah-me-LEE

Rating: 63% based on 42 votes

German variant of AMELIA

ARABELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 53% based on 118 votes

Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".

ARTHUR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: AHR-thər (English), ar-TUYR (French), AHR-toor (German), AHR-tur (Dutch)

Rating: 67% based on 121 votes

The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

ASHLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ASH-lee

Rating: 47% based on 103 votes

From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.

ASTRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French

Pronounced: AH-strid (Swedish), AH-stree (Norwegian), AHS-trit (German)

Rating: 62% based on 88 votes

Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.

ATTICUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 55% based on 107 votes

From a Roman name meaning "from Attica" in Latin. Attica is the region surrounding Athens in Greece. The author Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).

AUDREY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWD-ree

Rating: 59% based on 108 votes

Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AUGUST

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English

Pronounced: OW-guwst (German, Polish), AW-gəst (English)

Personal note: honoring

Rating: 70% based on 111 votes

German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS

AUGUSTUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch

Pronounced: ə-GUS-təs (English), ow-KHUYS-tus (Dutch)

Personal note: honoring?

Rating: 53% based on 108 votes

Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. This was also the name of three kings of Poland.

AURELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, Romanian, Polish

Pronounced: ow-RE-lyah (Italian), ow-REL-yah (Polish)

Rating: 62% based on 108 votes

Feminine form of AURELIUS

AURORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology

Pronounced: ow-RO-rah (Spanish), ə-RAWR-ə (English)

Rating: 62% based on 105 votes

Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.

AXEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German

Pronounced: AHK-sel (German)

Rating: 44% based on 102 votes

Medieval Danish form of ABSALOM

BLAKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BLAYK

Rating: 43% based on 52 votes

From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blāc "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).

CAIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Rating: 50% based on 99 votes

Roman variant of GAIUS

CALLIOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: kə-LIE-ə-pee (English)

Rating: 52% based on 62 votes

Latinized form of KALLIOPE

CASPIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)

Rating: 59% based on 79 votes

Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CHARLIE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: CHAHR-lee

Rating: 53% based on 100 votes

Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.

CHASE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: CHAYS

Rating: 36% based on 58 votes

From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.

CLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Late Roman

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (Italian, German, Spanish), KLER-ə (English), KLAR-ə (English)

Rating: 68% based on 82 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.

DAPHNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch

Other Scripts: Δαφνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAF-nee (English), DAHF-nə (Dutch)

Rating: 48% based on 47 votes

Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.

DECLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 55% based on 59 votes

Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.

DOMINIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DAHM-ə-nik

Rating: 69% based on 105 votes

From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.

DRACO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Δρακων (Ancient Greek)

Rating: 46% based on 100 votes

From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.

DRAKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DRAYK

Rating: 43% based on 98 votes

From an English surname derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".

EBBA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: E-bah (German)

Rating: 36% based on 57 votes

Feminine form of EBBE

EDWARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: ED-wərd (English), ED-vahrt (Polish)

Rating: 57% based on 100 votes

Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman conquest. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward. This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings).

ELEANOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 71% based on 64 votes

From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֵלִי (Hebrew), Ηλι (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-lie (English)

Rating: 54% based on 55 votes

Means "ascension" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the high priest of Israel and the teacher of Samuel. In England, Eli has been used as a Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation.

ELIÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Various

Rating: 42% based on 91 votes

In the case of Elian Gonzalez it is a combination of ELIZABETH and JUAN, the names of his parents.

ELIJAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical

Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ (Hebrew)

Pronounced: i-LIE-jə (English), i-LIE-zhə (English)

Rating: 55% based on 55 votes

From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH". Elijah was a Hebrew prophet of the 9th century BC, during the reign of King Ahab and his queen, Jezebel. The two Books of Kings in the Old Testament tell of his exploits, which culminate with him being carried to heaven in a chariot of fire.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Finnish, Swedish

Rating: 45% based on 43 votes

Finnish and Swedish form of HELEN

ELIZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: i-LIE-zə (English), e-LEE-zah (Polish)

Rating: 61% based on 41 votes

Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play 'Pygmalion' (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation 'My Fair Lady' (1956).

ELLEN (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ən

Rating: 55% based on 98 votes

Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 17th century, when Helen became more common.

ELLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee

Personal note: nickname

Rating: 45% based on 32 votes

Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El.

ELLIOT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 57% based on 72 votes

From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.

ÉLODIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ay-lo-DEE

Rating: 56% based on 34 votes

French form of ALODIA

ELVIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian

Pronounced: el-BEE-rah (Spanish), el-VEE-rah (Italian)

Rating: 37% based on 42 votes

Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements al "all" and wer "true".

EMILIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: e-MEEL-yah (Italian, Spanish, Polish)

Rating: 66% based on 71 votes

Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).

EMMELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Archaic)

Pronounced: EM-ə-leen, EM-ə-lien

Rating: 63% based on 100 votes

From an Old French form of the Germanic name Amelina, originally a diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element amal meaning "work". The Normans introduced this name to England.

EULALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: uu-la-LEE

Rating: 56% based on 9 votes

French form of EULALIA

FARREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 40% based on 4 votes

Variant of [Faren].

FELIX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: FE-liks (German), FAY-liks (Dutch), FEE-liks (English)

Rating: 62% based on 96 votes

From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

FREDRIKA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Finnish

Pronounced: fred-REE-kah (Swedish)

Rating: 45% based on 91 votes

Swedish and Finnish feminine form of FREDERICK

FREYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)

Pronounced: FRAY-ah (Norse Mythology), FRAY-ə (English)

Rating: 65% based on 103 votes

From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm in Asgard. Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

GABRIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ga-bree-EL (French), GAHP-ree-el (German), GAH-bryel (Spanish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAHP-ryel (Polish)

Rating: 69% based on 96 votes

From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "strong man of God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He appears in both the Old Testament and the New Testament, where he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GIDEON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew

Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)

Rating: 62% based on 52 votes

Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon was a hero of the Old Testament who led the Israelites against the Midianites. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

Personal note: 79%

Rating: 80% based on 43 votes

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HERMIONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: hər-MIE-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 63% based on 28 votes

Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.

ISAAC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)

Pronounced: IE-zək (English)

Rating: 62% based on 93 votes

From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) which meant "he laughs". Isaac in the Old Testament is the son of Abraham and the father of Esau and Jacob. As recounted in Genesis, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German

Pronounced: ee-sah-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), ee-za-BEL (French), ee-zah-BEL (German)

Rating: 60% based on 93 votes

Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.

This is the usual form of the name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth. The name was borne by two Spanish ruling queens, including Isabel of Castile, who sponsored the explorations of Christopher Columbus.

ISADORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 59% based on 92 votes

Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).

ISAK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish

Personal note: 32%

Rating: 32% based on 89 votes

Swedish form of ISAAC

ISIDOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Russian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Исидор (Russian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: EE-see-dawr (German)

Personal note: honoring

Rating: 44% based on 92 votes

German, Russian and Macedonian form of ISIDORE

ISOBEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 58% based on 53 votes

Scottish form of ISABEL

ISOLDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German, Celtic Mythology

Pronounced: i-ZOL-də (English), i-SOL-də (English), ee-ZAWL-du (German)

Rating: 75% based on 19 votes

The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice" and hild "battle".

In Arthurian legend she was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. She became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera 'Tristan und Isolde' (1865).

JACK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK

Rating: 63% based on 94 votes

Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JACKSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK-sən

Rating: 44% based on 87 votes

From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Rating: 71% based on 96 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JOLINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Dutch, French, German

Pronounced: yo-LEEN, yo-LEE-nə (Dutch)

Rating: 45% based on 19 votes

Variant of [Jolene] and [Jolina].

JOSEPHINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: JO-sə-feen (English), yo-ze-FEE-nə (German)

Rating: 68% based on 43 votes

English and German form of JOSÉPHINE

JUDE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JOOD (English)

Rating: 58% based on 92 votes

Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.

JULIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish, German

Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən (English), JOOL-yən (English), YUWL-yahn (Polish), YOO-lee-ahn (German)

Rating: 65% based on 97 votes

From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).

JUNI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Danish, Norwegian

Pronounced: Jʉː:ni

Rating: 47% based on 19 votes

In Sweden, Norway and Denmark, Juni is considered a variant of [Junia] and [Juno]. It can also be seen as a word name, however, since it coincides with the Scandinavian word juni "June" (compare [June]).
In Sweden, this name was first recorded in 1918.

JUNIPER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: JOON-ə-pər

Rating: 73% based on 7 votes

From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.

KEIRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Rating: 54% based on 53 votes

Variant of KIRA (2). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).

KELIA

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Personal note: 41%

Rating: 41% based on 17 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name.

KENDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KEN-drə

Rating: 53% based on 19 votes

Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK

KENNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish

Rating: 43% based on 19 votes

Feminine form of KENNETH

KENZIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KEN-zee

Rating: 42% based on 19 votes

Short form of MACKENZIE

KIERAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn

Rating: 56% based on 88 votes

Anglicized form of CIARÁN

KLARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian

Other Scripts: Клара (Russian, Ukrainian)

Pronounced: KLAH-rah (German, Russian, Polish)

Rating: 50% based on 90 votes

Form of CLARA

LEAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: לֵאָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: LEE-ə (English)

Rating: 53% based on 89 votes

From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament, Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Rating: 66% based on 93 votes

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LEONIDAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Λεωνιδας (Greek)

Rating: 55% based on 59 votes

From Greek λεων (leon) "lion". Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.

LEONORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian

Rating: 60% based on 89 votes

Italian short form of ELEANOR

LEOPOLD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish

Pronounced: LE-o-pawlt (German), LAY-o-pawlt (Dutch), LEE-ə-pold (English), le-AW-pawlt (Polish)

Rating: 55% based on 88 votes

Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).

LILY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIL-ee

Rating: 56% based on 27 votes

From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LOVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: LO-vah, LOO-vah

Rating: 47% based on 17 votes

Lova is a short form of [Lovisa]. "Lova" is also the Swedish word for "promise" (verb).

LUCAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin

Pronounced: LOO-kəs (English), LUY-kahs (Dutch), luy-KAH (French), LOO-kəsh (Portuguese)

Rating: 57% based on 88 votes

Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).

LYKKE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Danish

Personal note: 33%

Rating: 33% based on 87 votes

Means "good fortune, happiness" in Danish.

MABEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAY-bəl

Rating: 66% based on 9 votes

Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854), which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).

MACKENZIE

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: mə-KEN-zee

Rating: 38% based on 19 votes

From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-).

MARGOT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: mar-GO

Rating: 57% based on 7 votes

French short form of MARGARET

MATILDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak

Pronounced: mə-TIL-də (English)

Rating: 67% based on 96 votes

From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. It was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song 'Waltzing Matilda', written in 1895.

MAX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: MAHKS (German), MAKS (English)

Rating: 51% based on 85 votes

Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).

MAXIMILIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: mahk-see-MEE-lee-ahn (German), mak-si-MIL-ee-ən (English), mak-si-MIL-yən (English)

Rating: 56% based on 85 votes

From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.

MAXIMUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Rating: 46% based on 85 votes

Roman family name which was derived from Latin maximus "greatest". Saint Maximus was a monk and theologian from Constantinople in the 7th century.

MELINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Greek

Rating: 43% based on 82 votes

Elaboration of Mel (either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι meaning "honey"). A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.

MILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Czech

Other Scripts: Мила (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Rating: 57% based on 37 votes

Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element mil "gracious, dear".

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Rating: 60% based on 86 votes

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MINA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch, Limburgish

Pronounced: MEE-nə (English), MEE-nah (Dutch, Limburgish)

Rating: 58% based on 83 votes

Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.

MIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 美桜, 美緒 (Japanese)

Rating: 39% based on 78 votes

From Japanese 美 (mi) "beautiful" combined with 桜 (ou) "cherry blossom" or 緒 (o) "thread".

MIRIEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: mee'ree-el

Rating: 54% based on 20 votes

Míriel is the name of two characters in Tolkien's works. It means 'jewel-garlanded maiden'.

Míriel Serindë, a Noldorin Elf, was the wife of Finwë and father of Fëanor. The birth of her mighty son took so much of her spirit that she passed away.

Tar-Míriel was the rightful heir to the throne of Númenor, but was usurped by her cousin Pharazôn. Ar-Pharazôn led a fleet against Valinor, resulting in the destruction of Númenor. Legend said that Tar-Míriel sought to reach the peak of the Meneltarma before the end, but the waters took her as she climbed the slopes of the Holy Mountain.

NIAMH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology

Pronounced: NEEV

Rating: 51% based on 92 votes

Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.

NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LAH (French)

Rating: 61% based on 41 votes

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NICODEMUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Νικοδημος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: nik-ə-DEE-məs (English)

Rating: 44% based on 84 votes

From the Greek name Νικοδημος (Nikodemos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and δημος (demos) "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.

NIKLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Finnish

Pronounced: NIK-lahs (Swedish), NEEK-lahs (Finnish)

Personal note: honoring

Rating: 41% based on 82 votes

Swedish and Finnish form of NICHOLAS

NOAH (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: נוֹחַ (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: NO-ə (English)

Rating: 62% based on 62 votes

Derived from the Hebrew name נוֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.

NOELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: no-EL

Rating: 54% based on 86 votes

English form of NOËLLE

NOVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NO-və

Rating: 43% based on 32 votes

Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.

OLIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak

Other Scripts: Оливер (Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AHL-ə-vər (English), AW-lee-ver (German)

Rating: 69% based on 90 votes

From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London.

OPHELIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Literature

Pronounced: o-FEEL-yə (English)

Rating: 68% based on 91 votes

Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Rating: 66% based on 50 votes

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Breton

Pronounced: PER (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

Personal note: honoring

Rating: 37% based on 86 votes

Scandinavian and Breton form of PETER

PEREGRINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: PER-ə-grin, PER-ə-green

Personal note: MN, honoring

Rating: 55% based on 91 votes

From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.

PERSEPHONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Περσεφονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pər-SEF-ə-nee (English)

Rating: 57% based on 92 votes

Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.

PHILIPPA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British), German

Pronounced: FIL-i-pə (English), fi-LIP-ə (English)

Rating: 53% based on 69 votes

Latinate feminine form of PHILIP

PHINEAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: FIN-ee-əs (English)

Rating: 49% based on 49 votes

Variant of PHINEHAS used in some versions of the Bible.

RAFAELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Рафаела (Macedonian)

Rating: 49% based on 18 votes

Spanish, Portuguese and Macedonian feminine form of RAPHAEL

RAPHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Ραφαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ra-fa-EL (French), RAF-ee-el (English), RAY-fee-əl (English)

Rating: 62% based on 89 votes

From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Old Testament in the Book of Tobit, where it is told how he aided Tobias. This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (usually known simply as Raphael).

RAPHAELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Rating: 46% based on 18 votes

Feminine form of RAPHAEL

RASMUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Rating: 38% based on 77 votes

Scandinavian form of ERASMUS

REVERIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern, Rare)

Pronounced: REV-ə-ree

Rating: 54% based on 17 votes

As a noun, it has been used since 1325 and is Middle English meaning "daydream" or, more literally, "fanciful musing", from Old French reverie which was derived from rever meaning "to speak wildly." As a name, there are some instances of usage in the mid to late 1800s, but it is still relatively rare, with 7 babies named Reverie in 2012.

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Rating: 60% based on 90 votes

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

RONJA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Pronounced: RON-yah

Rating: 42% based on 37 votes

Invented by Swedish children's author Astrid Lindgren, who based it on the middle portion of Juronjaure, the name of a lake in Sweden. Lindgren used it in her book 'Ronia the Robber's Daughter' (Ronia is the English translation).

ROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: ROZ

Personal note: 73%

Rating: 72% based on 88 votes

Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.

ROWAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: RO-ən (English)

Rating: 68% based on 28 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendent of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

SAGA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish

Pronounced: SAH-gah (Swedish)

Rating: 45% based on 35 votes

Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".

SEBASTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian

Pronounced: ze-BAHS-tee-ahn (German), sə-BAS-chən (English), se-BAHS-tyahn (Polish)

Rating: 74% based on 31 votes

From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred by arrows after it was discovered he was a Christian. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

SERAPHINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman

Rating: 65% based on 67 votes

Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

SILAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Σιλας (Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-ləs (English)

Rating: 56% based on 87 votes

Short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. It was not used as an English name until after the Protestant Reformation.

SIMON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Симон (Macedonian), სიმონ (Georgian), Σιμων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: SIE-mən (English), see-MAWN (French), ZEE-mawn (German), SEE-mawn (Dutch)

Rating: 62% based on 92 votes

From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This was the name of several biblical characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. However, the most important person of this name in the New Testament was the apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus). Because of him, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became rarer after the Protestant Reformation.

SIRIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Astronomy

Pronounced: SIR-ee-əs (English), SEER-ee-əs (English)

Rating: 52% based on 88 votes

The name of a bright star in the constellation Canis Major, derived via Latin from Greek σειριος (seirios) "burning".

SOPHIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek

Other Scripts: Σοφια (Greek)

Pronounced: so-FEE-ə (English), so-FIE-ə (British English), zo-FEE-ah (German)

Rating: 69% based on 52 votes

Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which was the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.

This name was common among continental European royalty during the Middle Ages, and it was popularized in Britain by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. It was the name of characters in the novels 'Tom Jones' (1749) by Henry Fielding and 'The Vicar of Wakefield' (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith.

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Rating: 67% based on 95 votes

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

STORY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: STOR-ee

Rating: 32% based on 14 votes

From the English word meaning 'a tale'. One of the many modern 'word names' of which there has been an upsurge in the twenty-first century

THEODOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Romanian

Personal note: honoring

Rating: 58% based on 93 votes

German form of THEODORE, as well as a Scandinavian, Czech and Romanian variant of TEODOR. A famous bearer was American children's book creator Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.

THIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Variant of TIAGO

VILHELM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Hungarian

Personal note: honoring

Rating: 42% based on 89 votes

Scandinavian, Finnish and Hungarian form of WILLIAM

VIVIENNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Rating: 62% based on 39 votes

French form of VIVIANA

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 70% based on 97 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WILLOW

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: WIL-o

Rating: 62% based on 52 votes

From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.

XANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)

Pronounced: KSAHN-dər (Dutch), ZAN-dər (English)

Rating: 44% based on 74 votes

Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).

ZACHARIAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Ζαχαριας (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: zak-ə-RIE-əs (English)

Rating: 70% based on 4 votes

Greek form of ZECHARIAH. This form of the name is used in most English versions of the New Testament to refer to the father of John the Baptist. It was also borne by an 8th-century pope (called Zachary in English).

ZELDA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ZEL-də

Rating: 48% based on 88 votes

Short form of GRISELDA

ZEPHYR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)

Other Scripts: Ζεφυρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ZEF-ər (English)

Personal note: nn Zeph

Rating: 47% based on 86 votes

From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.

ZEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ζευς (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: ZOOS (English)

Personal note: GP, 33%

Rating: 33% based on 76 votes

The name of a Greek god, related to the old Indo-European god *Dyeus whose name probably meant "shine" or "sky". In Greek mythology he was the highest of the gods. After he and his siblings defeated the Titans, Zeus ruled over the earth and humankind from atop Mount Olympus. He had control over the weather and his weapon was a thunderbolt.
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