Martha Gold's Personal Name List

ADELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Italian, Finnish
Pronounced: a-DE-lə (German), ə-DEL (English), a-DE-le (Italian), AH-de-le (Finnish)
Form of ADÈLE.

ADERYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

ADRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), A-dryan (Polish), A-dree-an (German), u-dryi-AN (Russian)
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

ADRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Czech, English, Dutch
Pronounced: ad-RYA-na (Italian), adh-RYA-na (Spanish), a-DRYA-na (Polish), ayd-ree-AN-ə (English)
Feminine form of ADRIAN.

ÁINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AWN-ye
Means "radiance" in Gaelic. This was the name of the queen of the fairies in Celtic mythology. It is also taken as an Irish form of Anne.

AKI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 晶, 明, 秋, 亜希, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KYEE
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.

ALANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə
Feminine form of ALAN.

ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-lig-ZAN-dər (English), a-le-KSAN-du (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch), AW-lek-sawn-der (Hungarian)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALEXANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek), Александра (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-drə (English), a-le-KSAN-dra (German), ah-lək-SAHN-drah (Dutch), A-LUG-ZAHN-DRA (French), a-le-KSAN-dhra (Greek), ə-li-SHUN-drə (European Portuguese), a-le-SHUN-dru (Brazilian Portuguese), a-lek-SAN-dra (Romanian, Spanish, Italian), A-lek-san-dra (Slovak), A-LE-KSAN-DRA (Classical Greek)
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

ALEXIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: A-LEK-SEE-A (French), ə-LEK-see-ə (English)
Feminine form of ALEXIS.

AMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AM-bər
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).

ANGEL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ангел (Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AYN-jəl (English)
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.

ANGELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ангелина (Russian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: an-je-LEE-na (Italian), an-jə-LEEN-ə (English), un-gyi-LYEE-nə (Russian), an-ge-LEE-na (Polish)
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).

ANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аня (Russian)
Pronounced: A-nyə
Russian diminutive of ANNA.

ARIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ar-ee-AN-ə, ar-ee-AHN-ə
Variant of ARIANNA.

ARIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-RYAN
Variant of ARIANE.

ARIEL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֲרִיאֵל (Hebrew), Αριηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AR-ee-əl (English), ER-ee-əl (English), AY-ree-əl (English), A-RYEL (French)
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).

ASHLEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH-lee
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.

ASTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-tər
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".

AVERY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.

AZURE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: A-zhər
From the English word that means "sky blue". It is ultimately (via Old French, Latin and Arabic) from Persian لاجورد (lajvard) meaning "azure, lapis lazuli".

BARRETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAR-it
From a surname probably meaning "strife" in Middle English, originally given to a quarrelsome person.

BAYARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.

BÉIBHINN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: BAY-vin, BE-veen
Modern form of BÉBINN.

BELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEL
Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.

BENNETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEN-ət
Medieval form of BENEDICT. This was the more common spelling in England until the 18th century. Modern use of the name is probably also influenced by the common surname Bennett, itself a derivative of the medieval name.

BLAINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYN
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.

BLAISE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BLEZ
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

BLÁITHÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Variant of BLÁTHNAT using a different diminutive suffix.

BLAKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYK
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).

BLÁTHNAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BLAW-nit (Irish)
Means "little flower" from the Irish word blath "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but she was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.

BRACHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: בְּרָכָה (Hebrew)
Means "blessing" in Hebrew.

BRADEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: BRAY-dən (English)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".

BRADLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAD-lee
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).

BRAELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRAY-lin
A recently created name, formed using the popular name suffix lyn.

BRAITH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: BRAYTH
Meaning uncertain, perhaps from Welsh brith, braith meaning "speckled".

BRAN (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAHN (Welsh)
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.

BRANSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRAN-sən
From an English surname which meant "son of BRANDR".

BRANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wen (Welsh)
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.

BREE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: BREE
Anglicized form of BRÍGH.

BRENDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREN-dən (English)
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.

BRENNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREN-ən (English)
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).

BRETT
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRET
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).

BRIALLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: bree-AHSH-en
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.

BRIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə
Variant of BRIANA.

BRIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: bree-AN
Feminine form of BRIAN.

BRIAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
From the English word for the thorny plant.

BRIGID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Variant of BRIGHID.

BRIONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ən-ee
Variant of BRYONY.

BRISTOL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIS-təl
From the name of the city in southwest England which means "the site of the bridge".

BRITT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.

BRITTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIT-ən
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).

BROCK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAHK
From a surname which was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".

BRODY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRO-dee
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.

BROGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.

BRONAGH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of BRÓNACH.

BRONWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BRAHN-wen
Derived from the Welsh elements bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".

BRONWYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Variant of BRONWEN.

BRYANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIE-ənt
From a surname which was derived from the given name BRIAN.

BRYCE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIES
Variant of BRICE.

BRYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIN
Feminine variant of BRYN.

BYRNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BURN
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".

CADEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Gaelic surname Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán". In actuality, its popularity in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound - it shares its fashionable aden suffix sound with other popular names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.

CAILEAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KA-len
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.

CAILYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Variant of KAYLYN.

CALLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
From the name of a type of lily. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".

CALLAHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə-han
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Ceallacháin, which means "descendant of CEALLACHÁN".

CALLUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-um
Variant of CALUM.

CALVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-vin
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.

CAOIMHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KEE-va
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".

CAOLÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
From Gaelic caol "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.

CARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KER-ə
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.

CARADOC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Variant of CARADOG.

CARIDAD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ka-ree-DHADH
Spanish cognate of CHARITY.

CARLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-lee
Feminine form of CARL.

CARSON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: KAHR-sən
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).

CARTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-tər
From an English surname which meant "one who uses a cart".

CARWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".

CASPIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

CEDRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SED-rik
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).

CEINWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements cain "lovely" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".

CERIDWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ke-RID-wen
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.

CERISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SU-REEZ
Means "cherry" in French.

CHANDLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAND-lər
From an occupational surname which meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.

CHANTAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAHN-TAL (French), shawn-TAL (English), shan-TAL (English), shahn-TAHL (Dutch)
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".

CHARLIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAHR-lee
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.

CHARLIZE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Afrikaans
Feminine form of CHARLES using the popular Afrikaans name suffix ize. This name was popularized by South African actress Charlize Theron (1975-), who was named after her father Charles.

CHIP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHIP
Diminutive of CHARLES or CHRISTOPHER. It can also be from a nickname given in reference to the phrase a chip off the old block, used of a son who is similar to his father.

CHRISTIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KRIS-chən (English), KRISH-chən (English), KREES-TYAHN (French), KRIS-tyan (German), KRIS-tee-ahn (Swedish)
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.

CIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KYEE-ən (Irish)
Means "ancient" in Gaelic. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.

CIARÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.

CLAIRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLER
French form of CLARA.

CLARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAHRK
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).

CLAY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAY
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.

CLEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλεων (Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Κλεων (Kleon), a Greek name derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory".

CLÍODHNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KLEE-u-na (Irish)
Possibly means "shapely" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend this was the name of a beautiful goddess. She fell in love with a mortal named Ciabhan and left the Land of Promise with him, but when she arrived on the other shore she was swept to sea by a great wave.

COLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.

COLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Variant of COLUM.

COLUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.

COLWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
From the name of a river in northern Wales.

COMGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of COMHGHÁN.

CONALL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Gaelic. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.

CONAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Gaelic "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was the author who wrote the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.

CONN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.

CONNOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər (English)
Variant of CONOR.

COOPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOOP-ər, KUWP-ər
From a surname meaning "barrel maker" in Middle English.

CORAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: KAWR-əl (English)
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).

CORALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).

CORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
French form of QUIRINUS.

CORMAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.

CORWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-win
From an English surname, derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.

CREE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KREE
From the name of a Native American tribe of central Canada. Their name derives via French from the Cree word kiristino.

CREIGHTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRAY-tən
From a surname which was derived from a place name, originally from Gaelic crioch "border" combined with Old English tun "town".

CSILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: CHEEL-law
Derived from Hungarian csillag meaning "star". This name was created by the Hungarian author András Dugonics for an 1803 novel and later used and popularized by the poet Mihály Vörösmarty.

CUÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from the Irish element "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix.

CULLEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KUL-ən
From a surname, either CULLEN (1) or CULLEN (2).

CY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIE
Short form of CYRUS or CYRIL.

CYAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIE-an
From the English word meaning "greenish blue", ultimately derived from Greek κυανος (kyanos).

CYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Meaning unknown. Saint Cyra was a 5th-century Syrian hermit who was martyred with her companion Marana.

DÁIRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DAW-ra (Irish)
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish Gaelic. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.

DALE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-əl, DAYL
From an English surname which originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.

DAMHNAIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: DEV-nawt
Means "fawn" from Gaelic damh "stag, ox" combined with a diminutive suffix.

DAMON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Δαμων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAY-mən (English)
Derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.

DANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYN
From an English surname which was either a variant of the surname DEAN or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.

DAPHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δαφνη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAF-nee (English), DAHF-nə (Dutch)
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.

DARA (2)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Khmer
Other Scripts: ដរា (Khmer)
Means "star" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.

DARCY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).

DARIAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DER-ee-ən, DAR-ee-ən
Probably an elaborated form of DARREN.

DAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWN
From the English word dawn, ultimately derived from Old English dagung.

DAX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAKS
From an English surname which was derived either from the town of Dax in France or else from the Old English given name Dæcca (of unknown meaning).

DECLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.

DEIRDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DEER-drə (English), DEER-dree (English), DER-dre (Irish)
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Celtic word meaning "woman". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.

It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 20th century, influenced by two plays featuring the character: William Butler Yeats' 'Deirdre' (1907) and J. M. Synge's 'Deirdre of the Sorrows' (1910).

DELL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEL
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who lived in a dell or valley.

DENVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEN-vər
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "Dane ford" in Old English. This is the name of the capital city of Colorado, which was named for the politician James W. Denver (1817-1892).

DEREK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DER-ik
From the older English name Dederick, which was in origin a Low German form of THEODORIC. It was imported to England from the Low Countries in the 15th century.

DERMOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of DIARMAID.

DERYA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "sea, ocean" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.

DEVIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: DEV-in
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).

DEXTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEK-stər
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".

DIARMAID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DYEE-ər-ə-məd (Irish)
Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.

DIKLAH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: דִּקְלָה (Hebrew)
Possibly means "palm grove" in Hebrew or Aramaic. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Joktan. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name.

DINAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דִּינָה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: DIE-nə (English)
Means "judged" in Hebrew. She is the daughter of Jacob and Leah in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English given name since after the Protestant Reformation.

DOMINIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWM-i-nik
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.

DONOVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".

DOR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: דּוֹר (Hebrew)
Means "generation" in Hebrew.

DORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən (English), DAW-RYAHN (French)
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.

DUNCAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUN-kən (English)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).

DYLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an (Welsh), DIL-ən (English)
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series 'Beverly Hills 90210'.

DYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DIE-sən
From an English surname which meant "son of DYE".

EIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "snow" in Welsh.

EIRIAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.

EIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".

ELAIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "fawn" in Welsh.

ELANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Means "star sun" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.

ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Aliénor. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֵלִי (Hebrew), Ηλι (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-lie (English)
Means "ascension" in Hebrew. In the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament he is a high priest of the Israelites. He took the young Samuel into his service and gave him guidance when God spoke to him. Because of the misdeeds of his sons, Eli and his descendants were cursed to die before reaching old age.

Eli has been used as an English Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was the American inventor of the cotton gin Eli Whitney (1765-1825).

ELI (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֵלִי (Hebrew)
Means "my God" in Hebrew.

EMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: EM-ə (English), E-MA (French), EM-mah (Finnish), E-ma (German)
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).

ERIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: ER-in (English)
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.

ETHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən (English), E-TAN (French)
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel 'Ethan Frome' (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

EVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EV-ən (English)
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.

EWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: YOO-ən
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.

EZRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא (Hebrew)
Pronounced: EZ-rə (English)
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.

FÁELÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Irish
Older form of FAOLÁN.

FALLON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera 'Dynasty'.

FAWN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWN
From the English word fawn for a young deer.

FELICITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: fi-LIS-i-tee
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.

FELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: fe-LEE-nə
Dutch feminine form of FELINUS.

FINLEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.

FINN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.

FINNEGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: FIN-ə-gən
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of a character in James Joyce's novel 'Finnegans Wake' (1939), the title of which was based on a 19th-century Irish ballad called 'Finnegan's Wake'.

FIONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: fee-O-nə
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).

FIONN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: FYOON (Irish), FYEEN (Irish), FIN (English)
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.

FLAITHRÍ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Means "king of princes" from Gaelic flaith "prince" and "king".

FLANN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FLAN
Means "red" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of a 9th-century king of Tara in Ireland.

FLETCHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLECH-ər
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.

FLYNN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLIN
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of FLANN".

FORD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWRD
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "ford" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).

FOSTER (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWS-tər
From an English surname which has several different origins: see FOSTER (1), FOSTER (2), FOSTER (3) and FOSTER (4).

FRASER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FRAY-zər, FRAY-zhər
From a Scottish surname which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was Simon Fraser (1776-1862), a Canadian explorer.

GABRIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Γαβριηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEL (French), ga-BRYEL (Spanish), GA-bree-el (German, Classical Latin), GAHB-ree-el (Finnish), GAY-bree-əl (English), GAB-ryel (Polish)
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) "strong man, hero" and אֶל ('El) "God". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

GALEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAY-lən
Modern form of the Greek name Γαληνος (Galenos), which meant "calm" from Greek γαληνη (galene). It was borne by a 2nd-century BC Greco-Roman physician who contributed to anatomy and medicine. In modern times the name is occasionally given in his honour.

GARRETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GER-it, GAR-it
From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.

GARRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GER-ik, GAR-ik
From a surname which was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".

GAVIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in (English)
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.

GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEM-ma (Italian), ZHEM-mə (Catalan), JEM-ə (English), KHE-mah (Dutch)
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.

GENEVIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEN-ə-veev
English form of GENEVIÈVE.

GIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Γιαννα (Greek)
Pronounced: JAN-na (Italian), YA-na (Greek)
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a modern Greek variant of IOANNA.

GIDEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן (Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən (English)
Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

GINGER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-jər
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.

GISELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZHEE-ZEL (French), ji-ZEL (English)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.

GLYNN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Variant of GLYN.

GRAHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm (English), GRAM (English)
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.

GRÁINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: GRAW-nyə (Irish)
Possibly derived from Gaelic grán meaning "grain". This was the name of an ancient Irish grain goddess. The name also belonged to the fiancée of Fionn mac Cumhail and the lover of Diarmaid in later Irish legend, and it is often associated with gráidh "love".

GRANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GRANT (English)
From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.

GRETCHEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English
Pronounced: GRET-khən (German), GRECH-ən (English)
German diminutive of MARGARETA.

GRIFFIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRIF-in
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).

GWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEN
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.

GWENDOLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)
Variant of GWENDOLEN.

GYPSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JIP-see
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.

HAIDEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: HAY-dee (English)
Perhaps intended to derive from Greek αιδοιος (aidoios) "modest, reverent". This name was created by Byron for a character in his poem 'Don Juan' (1819).

HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה (Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAN-ə (English), HA-na (German)
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna, which is used in the New Testament, has traditionally been more common as a Christian name.

HARLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lən
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).

HARPER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-pər
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.

HARRY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HER-ee, HAR-ee
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.

HAYDN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: HAY-dən
From a German surname meaning "heathen". It is used in honour of the Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).

HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.

HEIDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: HIE-dee (German, English), HAY-dee (Finnish)
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.

HELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: he-LEN (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), he-LE-nə (German), HE-LE-NE (Classical Greek)
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.

HOLDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HOL-dən
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel 'The Catcher in the Rye' (1951), Holden Caufield.

IAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən (English)
Scottish form of JOHN.

INDIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा (Sanskrit), इन्दिरा, इंदिरा (Hindi), इंदिरा (Marathi), ಇಂದಿರಾ (Kannada), இந்திரா (Tamil)
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

IONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: ie-ON-ə (English)
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".

IONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ιονη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ie-O-nee (English), IE-o-nee (English), ie-ON (English)
From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.

ISAAC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: יִצְחָק (Hebrew)
Pronounced: IE-zək (English)
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.

As an English Christian name, Isaac was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, though it was more common among Jews. It became more widespread after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers include the physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) and the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov (1920-1992).

ISABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-za-BEL-la (Italian), ee-za-BE-la (German), iz-ə-BEL-ə (English)
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: IE-lə
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.

JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JACKSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).

JADEN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-dən
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.

JAMIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: JAY-mee
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.

JAMIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: JAY-mee
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.

JARED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יָרֶד, יֶרֶד (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JER-əd (English), JAR-əd (English)
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent". This is the name of a close descendant of Adam in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popularized in the 1960s by the character Jarrod Barkley on the television series 'The Big Valley'.

JARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: JER-əth (English), JAR-əth (English)
Probably a blend of JARED and GARETH. This was the name of the Goblin King, played by David Bowie, in the movie 'Labyrinth' (1986).

JARRETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAR-it, JER-it
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.

JASMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAZ-min (English), ZHAS-MEEN (French)
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).

JASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
Other Scripts: Ιασων (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: JAY-sən (English), ZHA-ZAWN (French)
From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

JENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Finnish
Pronounced: JEN-ə (English), YEN-nah (Finnish)
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series 'Dallas'.

JEROME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jə-ROM
From the Greek name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name", derived from ‘ιερος (hieros) "sacred" and ονομα (onoma) "name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century.

JESSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JES-ee (English), YES-sə (Dutch)
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.

JILL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL
Short form of GILLIAN.

JOANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: jo-AN (English), ZHAW-AN (French)
Variant of JOAN (1) or JOHANNE.

JOCELYN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAHS-lin (English), JAHS-ə-lin (English), ZHO-SE-LEN (French)
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Goths, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.

JOEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl (English), kho-EL (Spanish), zhoo-EL (Portuguese), YO-el (Swedish, Finnish)
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.

JOHNNY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAHN-ee (American English), JAWN-ee (British English)
Diminutive of JOHN. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).

JOLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-LEEN
Formed from JO and the popular name suffix lene. This name was created in the 20th century.

JORDAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Јордан (Macedonian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən (English)
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

JOSS
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAWS
Short form of JOCELYN.

JOY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOI
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.

KAI (3)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Means "sea" in Hawaiian.

KAVERI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: कावेरी (Hindi)
From the name of the Kaveri River in southern India.

KEEGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEE-gən
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.

KEELAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of CAOILFHIONN, sometimes used as a masculine name.

KEELEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Variant of KEELY.

KEELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEE-lee
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".

KELAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN.

KELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Possibly derived from Old Norse kildr meaning "a spring".

KELLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEL-ee (English)
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).

KENAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קֵינָן (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KEE-nən (English)
Possibly means "possession" in Hebrew. He is a son of Enosh and a great-grandson of Adam in the Old Testament.

KENDALL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEN-dəl
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".

KENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Feminine form of KENNETH.

KENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KENT
From a surname which was originally derived from Kent, the name of a county in England, which may be derived from a Brythonic word meaning "coastal district".

KERR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a place name meaning "rough wet ground" in Old Norse.

KESHET
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: קֶשֶׁת (Hebrew)
Means "rainbow" in Hebrew.

KESTREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KES-trəl
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.

KIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: KEE-ah
Diminutive of KRISTINA.

KIERAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-awn, KEE-ar-awn
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.

KILIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Irish, French
Pronounced: KEE-lyan (German)
German form and Irish and French variant of CILLIAN.

KIP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIP
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".

KIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Кира (Russian)
Pronounced: KYEE-rə
Russian feminine form of CYRUS.

KIRAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil, Gujarati, Nepali, Urdu
Other Scripts: किरण (Hindi, Marathi, Nepali), ಕಿರಣ್ (Kannada), కిరణ్ (Telugu), കിരൺ (Malayalam), கிரன் (Tamil), કિરણ (Gujarati), کرن (Urdu)
Derived from Sanskrit किरण (kirana) which can mean "dust" or "thread" or "sunbeam".

KIT
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIT
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.

KLAHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Thai
Other Scripts: กล้าหาญ (Thai)
Means "brave" in Thai.

KRISHNA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Other Scripts: कृष्ण (Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali), কৃষ্ণ (Bengali), કૃષ્ણ (Gujarati), కృష్ణ (Telugu), கிருஷ்ணா (Tamil), ಕೃಷ್ಣ (Kannada), കൃഷ്ണ (Malayalam)
Pronounced: KRISH-nə (English)
Means "black, dark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god believed to be an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He was the youngest of King Vasudeva's eight children, six of whom were killed by King Kamsa because of a prophecy that a child of Vasudeva would kill Kamsa. Krishna however was saved and he eventually killed the king as well as performing many other great feats. In some Hindu traditions, Krishna is regarded as the supreme deity. He is usually depicted with blue skin.

KYLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIEL, KIE-əl
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".

KYLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIE-lər
Probably a variant of KYLE, blending it with TYLER. It also coincides with the rare surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler, which is of uncertain meaning.

KYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).

LACEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-see
From a surname which was a variant of LACY.

LACHLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Australian)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.

LAKE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAYK
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.

LANDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAN-dən
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).

LANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAYN
From a surname meaning "lane, path" which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.

LAOISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LEE-sha
Possibly a newer form of LUIGSECH. It is also used as an Irish form of Louise.

LÁRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Pronounced: LOW-rah
Icelandic form of LAURA.

LARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Latvian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Лариса (Russian, Ukrainian), Λαρισα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lu-RYEE-sə (Russian)
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient city of Larisa in Thessaly, which meant "citadel". In Greek legends, the nymph Larisa was either a daughter or mother of Pelasgus, the ancestor of the mythical Pelasgians. This name was later borne by a 4th-century Greek martyr who is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Church. The name (of the city, nymph and saint) is commonly Latinized as Larissa, with a double s.

LARK
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAHRK
From the English word for the type of songbird.

LAUREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əl
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.

LEE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEE
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.

LEIGHTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-tən
From a surname which was a variant of LAYTON.

LENNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: LEN-ən
Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Leannáin, which means "descendant of Leannán". The name Leannán means "lover" in Gaelic. This surname was borne by musician John Lennon (1940-1980), a member of the Beatles.

LENNOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: LEN-əks
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".

LÍADAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LEE-din
Means "grey lady" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend she was a poetess who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief.

LIESEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEE-zəl
German diminutive of ELISABETH.

LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.

LISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: LEEZ (French, English), LEE-se (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish), LEES (English)
Short form of ELISABETH or ELIZABETH.

LLOYD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOID
From a surname which was derived from Welsh llwyd meaning "grey". The composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-) is a famous bearer of this name.

LOGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LO-gən (English)
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.

LONÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LUW-nan
Means "little blackbird", derived from Irish Gaelic lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix.

LONDON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LUN-dən
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).

LORCÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LOR-kan
Means "little fierce one", derived from Irish Gaelic lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.

LORRAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-RAYN
From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.

LUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: LOOK (English)
English form of the Greek name Λουκας (Loukas) which meant "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.

Due to his renown, the name became common in the Christian world (in various spellings). As an English name, Luke has been in use since the 12th century alongside the Latin form Lucas. A famous fictional bearer was the hero Luke Skywalker from the 'Star Wars' movies, beginning in 1977.

LUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LUX
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: LUKS (English)
Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".

LUZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LOOTH (European Spanish), LOOS (Latin American Spanish)
Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".

LYDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδια (Ancient Greek), Лѷдіа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə (English), LUY-dya (German)
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

LYNDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-dən
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "lime tree hill" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).

LYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə (English)
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.

LYRIC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MADDOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAD-əks
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.

MADOC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Possibly derived from Welsh mad "fortunate" combined with a diminutive suffix.

MÀIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MA:-ree
Scottish form of MARY.

MÁIRÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MOI-reen, MAW-reen
Irish diminutive of MARY.

MAIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Combination of MAIR and Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".

MAJOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-jər
From a surname which was originally derived from the given name Mauger, an Old French form of the Germanic name Malger meaning "council spear". The name can also be given in reference to the English word major.

MALACHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי (Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie (English)
From the Hebrew מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

MALCOLM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAL-kəm
From Scottish Máel Coluim which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.

MARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מָרָא (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAHR-ə (English), MAR-ə (English)
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This is a name taken by Naomi in the Old Testament (see Ruth 1:20).

MARGARET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of 'Gone with the Wind', and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical
Other Scripts: Марк (Russian)
Pronounced: MAHRK (English), MARK (Russian)
Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'. He took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

MARLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lee
Variant of MARLEY.

MARLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-lən
Meaning unknown. This name was popularized by the American actor Marlon Brando (1924-2004), who was named after his father.

MARTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Μαρθα (Greek), Марѳа (Church Slavic)
Pronounced: MAHR-thə (English), MAR-ta (German)
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.

The name was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington. It is also borne by the media personality Martha Stewart (1941-).

MASON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-sən
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").

MAURA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: MOW-ra (Italian, Spanish)
Feminine form of MAURUS.

MAURA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAWR-ə
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It has also been associated with Gaelic mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish or Scottish martyr.

MAX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: MAKS (German, English)
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).

MAXINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mak-SEEN
Feminine form of MAX. It has been commonly used only since the beginning of the 20th century.

MAXWELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAKS-wel
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.

MEALLÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MEL-awn
Possibly means "lightning" in Irish Gaelic.

MEG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.

MEGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEG-ən
Variant of MEGAN.

MEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מֵאִירָה (Hebrew)
Feminine form of MEIR.

MELODY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEL-ə-dee
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) "to sing".

MERLIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: MUR-lin (English)
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".

Geoffrey based parts of Merlin's character on Myrddin Wyllt, a semi-legendary madman and prophet who lived in the Caledonian Forest. Other parts of his life were based on that of the historical 5th-century Romano-British military leader Ambrosius Aurelianus. In Geoffrey's version of the tales and later embellishments Merlin is a wizard and counselor for King Arthur.

MERRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MER-ik
From a surname which was originally derived from the Welsh given name MEURIG.

MERRITT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MER-it
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "boundary gate" in Old English.

MILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ, MIE-əlz
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

MIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada
Other Scripts: मीरा (Hindi, Marathi), മീര (Malayalam), மீரா (Tamil), ಮೀರಾ (Kannada)
Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.

MIRA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish
Other Scripts: Мира (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: MYEE-ra (Polish)
Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".

MIRANDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: mə-RAN-də (English)
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.

MIREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Basque form of MARIA.

MORGAN (1)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, French
Pronounced: MAWR-gən (English), MAWR-GAN (French)
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).

MORWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish, Welsh
Variant of MORWENNA.

MURCHADH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and cadh "warrior".

MURTAGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of MUIRCHERTACH or MUIREDACH.

NADIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надя (Russian, Bulgarian), Надія (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: NA-DYA (French), NAD-yə (English), NAHD-yə (English), NA-dyə (Russian)
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the Western world, as well as a variant transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).

NADIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نديّة (Arabic)
Variant transcription of NADIYYA.

NAOMI (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: נָעֳמִי (Hebrew)
Pronounced: nay-O-mee (English), nie-O-mee (English)
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).

Though long common as a Jewish name, Naomi was not typically used as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer is the British model Naomi Campbell (1970-).

NEASA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYAS-a (Irish), NAS-a (Irish)
Meaning uncertain. In Irish legend she was the mother of Conchobhar, king of Ulster. According to some versions of the legend she was originally named Assa meaning "gentle", but was renamed Ni-assa "not gentle" after she sought to avenge the murders of her foster fathers.

NELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.

NELSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEL-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of NEIL". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he destroyed a combined French and Spanish fleet, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.

NERISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρεις (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.

NESSA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Means "miracle" in Hebrew.

NEVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: NEV-an
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.

NIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Welsh form of NIAMH.

NIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Means "purpose" in Swahili.

NICHOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NILES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIELZ
From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.

NINIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.

NISHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, Gujarati, Bengali, Nepali
Other Scripts: निशा (Hindi, Marathi, Nepali), ನಿಶಾ (Kannada), നിഷാ (Malayalam), நிஷா (Tamil), నిషా (Telugu), નિશા (Gujarati), নিশা (Bengali)
Means "night" in Sanskrit.

NISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: נִסָה (Hebrew)
Means "sign" in Hebrew.

NIVEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.

NOAH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: נֹחַ, נוֹחַ (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-ə (English)
Derived from the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.

As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans. A famous bearer was the American lexicographer Noah Webster (1758-1843).

NOEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NOL, NO-əl
English form of NOËL.

NOLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lan
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.

NOLL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of OLIVER.

NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.

NYSSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of an ancient town of Asia Minor where Saint Gregory was bishop. Nyssa is also the genus name of a type of tree, also called the Tupelo.

OWEN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: O-in (English)
Modern form of OWAIN.

PAIGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYJ
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".

PARKER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHR-kər
From an English occupational surname which meant "keeper of the park".

PATRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German
Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), PA-TREEK (French), PA-trik (German)
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: PAKS (Classical Latin)
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.

PEARL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.

PENNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEN-ee
Diminutive of PENELOPE.

PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοιβη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee (English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).

PIPER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PIE-pər
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.

POLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHL-ee
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.

QUENTIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAHN-TEN (French), KWEN-tin (English)
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.

QUINLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KWIN-lən
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caoinlean meaning "descendant of Caoinlean". The name Caoinlean means "slender" in Gaelic.

RACHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָחֵל (Hebrew), Ραχηλ (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RAY-chəl (English), RA-SHEL (French), RA-khəl (German), RAH-khəl (Dutch)
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. She was the younger sister of Jacob's first wife Leah.

The name was common among Jews in the Middle Ages, but it was not generally used as a Christian name in the English-speaking world until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was the American conservationist Rachel Carson (1907-1964).

RAIN (1)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RAYN
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.

RASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رشا (Arabic)
Means "young gazelle" in Arabic.

RAVEN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-vən
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.

RAYEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Mapuche, Spanish (Latin American)
Means "flower" in Mapuche.

RED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RED
From the English word, ultimately derived from Old English read. It was originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.

REED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REED
From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).

REESE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.

REGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REE-gən
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy 'King Lear' (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie 'The Exorcist' (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.

REUBEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: רְאוּבֵן (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROO-bən (English)
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.

RHEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ρεια (Ancient Greek)
Greek form of RHEA.

RHETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RET
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936).

RHIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: REE-an
Derived from Welsh rhiain meaning "maiden".

RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn (Welsh), ree-AN-ən (English), REE-ən-ən (English)
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song 'Rhiannon' (1976).

RHONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Possibly derived from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island" in Gaelic.

RHONWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means either "fair spear" or "fair hair" in Welsh. The first element is either rhon "spear" or rhawn "(coarse) hair", and the second element is gwen "fair, white, blessed".

RHOSYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Means "rose" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

RHYS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

RIDLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RID-lee
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "reed clearing" or "cleared wood" in Old English.

ROAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Variant of RONNE.

ROGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: RAWJ-ər (English), RAW-ZHE (French), RO-gu (German)
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.

ROHAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada
Other Scripts: रोहन (Hindi, Marathi), রোহন (Bengali), ರೋಹನ್ (Kannada)
Derived from Sanskrit रोहण (rohana) meaning "ascending".

ROHAN (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
From the novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, where it is a place name meaning "horse country" in Sindarin.

RÓISÍN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ROSH-een
Diminutive of RÓIS.

ROLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Ролан (Russian)
Russian form of ROLAND.

ROMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
Other Scripts: Роман (Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN (Russian), RAW-man (Polish)
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".

RÓNÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: RON-awn
Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

RONNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element hraban meaning "raven".

RÓRDÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ROR-dan
From the older Irish name Ríoghbhardán, which meant "little poet king" from Irish Gaelic ríogh "king" combined with bard "poet" and a diminutive suffix.

ROSALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE (French), ro-za-LEE (German), RO-zə-lee (English)
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSHAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Persian, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Other Scripts: روشن (Persian), रोशन (Hindi, Marathi, Nepali)
Means "light, bright" in Persian.

ROSS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWS (English)
From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.

ROSWITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: raws-VEE-ta
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinth "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems.

ROWAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən (English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

RUADHÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ROO-awn
Diminutive of RUADH.

RYLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lən
Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.

SABAH
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish
Other Scripts: صباح (Arabic)
Means "morning" in Arabic and Turkish.

SABINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Danish
Pronounced: SA-BEEN (French), za-BEE-nə (German)
French, German and Danish form of SABINA.

SABLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-bəl
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.

SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Diminutive of SARAH.

SAFFRON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-rən
From the English word which refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".

SAGE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.

SAIBH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SIEV
Variant of SADB.

SANDY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAN-dee
Originally a diminutive of ALEXANDER. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of ALEXANDRA or SANDRA. It can also be given in reference to the colour.

SAOIRSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-sha
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.

SARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, German, French, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish, English, Arabic, Persian, Bosnian
Other Scripts: Σαρα (Greek), Сара (Serbian, Macedonian), سارة (Arabic), سارا (Persian)
Pronounced: SA-ra (Spanish, Danish, Icelandic, Polish), SAH-rah (Finnish, Dutch), ZA-ra (German), SA-RA (French), SER-ə (English), SAR-ə (English), SA:-ra (Arabic)
Form of SARAH.

SATCHEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SACH-əl
From a surname derived from Old English sacc meaning "sack, bag", referring to a person who was a bag maker.

SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).

SAWYER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).

SCOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: SKAHT (American English), SKAWT (British English)
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.

SÉAGHDHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAY
Possibly means "admirable" or "hawk-like" in Gaelic.

SEREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "star" in Welsh.

SERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə (English), se-RE-na (Italian)
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).

SHANNON
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAN-ən
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha na tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.

SHILOH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה (Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo (English)
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.

SHIORI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 詩織, 栞, 撓, etc. (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SHEE-O-REE
As a feminine name it can be from Japanese (shi) meaning "poem" combined with (ori) meaning "weave". It can also be from (shiori) meaning "bookmark" (usually feminine) or (shiori) meaning "lithe, bending" (usually masculine), as well as other kanji or kanji combinations.

SHIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁירי (Hebrew)
Means "my song" in Hebrew.

SIDNEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).

SIENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EN-ə
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.

SIERRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-ER-ə
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.

SÍOMHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEE-va
Variant of SÍTHMAITH.

SIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: SEE-ree (Swedish)
Short form of SIGRID.

SKYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.

SLADE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLAYD
From a surname which meant "valley" in Old English.

SLÁINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SLAW-na
Means "health" in Irish Gaelic.

SLOANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SLON
From an Irish surname which was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.

SOLEDAD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: so-le-DHADH
Means "solitude" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María de Soledad, meaning "Mary of Solitude".

SONAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Other Scripts: सोनल (Hindi, Marathi), સોનલ (Gujarati)
From Hindi सोना (sona), Marathi सोन (son) or Gujarati સોનું (sonum) meaning "gold", all derived from Sanskrit सुवर्ण (suvarna) meaning literally "good colour".

SORCHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: SAWR-ə-khə (Irish), SAWR-khə (Irish)
Means "radiant" in Gaelic. It is sometimes used as an Irish form of Sarah.

SORREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAWR-əl
From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".

SRI
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Indonesian
Other Scripts: శ్రీ (Telugu), ஸ்ரீ (Tamil)
Indonesian and southern Indian form of SHRI.

STARLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR-lə
Elaborated form of STAR.

SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.

SUSANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Ancient Hebrew)
Form of SUSANNA found in some versions of the Old Testament.

SYBIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIB-əl
Variant of SIBYL. This spelling variation has existed since the Middle Ages.

SYDNEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788. Since the 1990s this name has been mainly feminine.

SYLVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə (English), SUYL-vee-ah (Finnish)
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.

TABITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ταβιθα (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAB-i-thə (English)
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show 'Bewitched', in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.

TAMSIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-sin
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.

TANITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars.

TARAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Тарас (Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: tu-RAS (Russian)
Ukrainian and Russian form of the Greek name Ταρασιος (Tarasios), which possibly means "from Taras". Taras was an Italian city, now called Taranto, which was founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BC and was named for the Greek mythological figure Taras, a son of Poseidon. Saint Tarasios was an 8th-century bishop of Constantinople. It was also borne by the Ukrainian writer and artist Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).

TATE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAYT
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.

TATIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Τατιανα (Greek), ტატიანა (Georgian), Татьяна (Russian), Татяна (Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ta-TYA-na (Italian, Spanish, Polish), TAH-tee-ah-nah (Finnish), ta-tee-AN-ə (English), ta-TYAN-ə (English), tu-TYA-nə (Russian)
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.

TATUM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TA-təm
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.

TAWNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAW-nee
From the English word, ultimately deriving from Old French tané, which means "light brown".

TEAGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.

TEAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEEL
From the English word for the type of duck or the greenish-blue colour.

TEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Derived from Welsh teg "fair".

THANE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: THAYN
From the Scottish and English noble title, which was originally from Old English thegn.

THEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: TE-a (German), THEE-ə (English)
Short form of DOROTHEA or THEODORA.

TIAMAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology
Pronounced: TEE-ə-maht (English), TYAH-maht (English)
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.

TIERNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNÁN.

TORIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.

TORSTEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Danish, German
Pronounced: TOSH-ten (Swedish), TAWRS-tən (German)
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".

TRENTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TREN-tən
From the name of a New Jersey city established in the 17th century by William Trent. It means "TRENT's town".

TREVOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: TRE-vər (English)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "big village" from Welsh tref "village" and mawr "large".

TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən (English), TREES-TAHN (French)
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.

TROY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TROI
From a surname that originally denoted a person from the city of Troyes in France. This was also the name of the ancient city that was besieged by the Greeks in Homer's 'Iliad'.

TRUMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TROO-mən
From a surname which meant "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It was also borne by American writer Truman Capote (1924-1984).

TUCKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TUK-ər
From an occupational surname derived from Old English tucian meaning "one who fulls cloth".

TURIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Means "victory mood" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Turin was a cursed hero, the slayer of the dragon Glaurung. He was also called Turambar, Mormegil, and other names. This is also the Anglicized name of the city of Torino in Italy.

TYLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIE-lər
From an English surname meaning "tiler of roofs". The surname was borne by American president John Tyler (1790-1862).

TYSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIE-sən
From an English surname which could be derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand". Alternatively, it could be a variant of DYSON. A famous bearer of the surname was boxer Mike Tyson (1966-).

UNDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.

VANESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: və-NES-ə (English), va-NE-sa (German)
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.

VAUGHN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: VAWN
From a Welsh surname which was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".

VERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Pronounced: ve-RE-na (German)
Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name BERENICE. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.

VERNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VURN-ən
From a Norman surname which was from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder".

WALKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWK-ər
From an English surname which referred to the medieval occupational of a walker, also known as a fuller. Walkers would tread on wet, unprocessed wool in order to clean and thicken it. The word ultimately derives from Old English wealcan "to walk".

WALLACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: WAWL-is (English)
From a Scottish and English surname which originally meant "Welsh" or "foreigner" in Norman French. It was first used as given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, the Scottish hero who led a rebellion to expel the English invaders from Scotland in the 13th century.

WARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWRD
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".

WARREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWR-ən
From an English surname which was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).

WAYLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAY-lən
Variant of WAYLAND. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland.

WENDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEN-dee
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play 'Peter Pan' (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.

WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REN
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.

WYNN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: WIN
Variant of WYN.

XAVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Catalan, Spanish (Archaic)
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər (English), ig-ZAY-vyər (English), GZA-VYE (French), sha-VYER (Portuguese)
Derived from the Basque place name Etxeberria meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552) who was borne in a village of this name. He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries. His surname has since been adopted as a given name in his honour, chiefly among Catholics.

YASMIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Arabic, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: یاسمین (Persian), ياسمين (Arabic)
Pronounced: YAZ-min (English)
From Persian یاسمن (yasamen) meaning "jasmine". In modern times it has been used in the English-speaking world, as a variant of JASMINE.

ZACHARY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree (English)
Usual English form of ZACHARIAS, used in some English versions of the New Testament. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).

ZION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: צִיוֹן (Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIE-ən (English)
From the name of a citadel which was in the center of Jerusalem. Zion is also used to refer to a Jewish homeland and to heaven.

ZOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωη (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZO-ee (English), DZO-e (Italian)
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2017.