Names Starting with G

gender
usage
Gülden f Turkish
Means "from the rose" in Turkish.
Guli f Uzbek
Uzbek form of Gul.
Gulisa f Georgian
Means "of the heart" in Georgian, from გულის (gulis), the genitive of გული (guli) meaning "heart".
Gülistan f Turkish
Means "rose garden" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
Gulistan f Kurdish
Kurdish form of Gülistan.
Gülizar f Turkish
Turkish form of Golzar.
Gull f Swedish
Short form of various Scandinavian names beginning with the Old Norse element guð meaning "god".
Gulla f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gull.
Gulmira f Kyrgyz, Kazakh
From Kyrgyz and Kazakh гүл (gul) meaning "flower", ultimately from Persian گل (gol), combined with Arabic أميرة (amira) meaning "princess".
Gülnar f Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Golnar.
Gulnar f Kazakh
Kazakh form of Golnar.
Gülnarə f Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of Golnar.
Gulnara f Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Georgian, Azerbaijani
Kazakh, Kyrgyz and Georgian form of Golnar, as well as a simplified Azerbaijani variant.
Gülnaz f Turkish
Turkish form of Golnaz.
Gulnaz f Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Georgian, Urdu
Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Georgian and Urdu form of Golnaz.
Gulnora f Uzbek
Uzbek form of Golnar.
Gülnur f Turkish
Means "rose light" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Gulrukh f Urdu
Means "rose faced" in Persian. This was the name of a wife of the Mughal emperor Babur.
Gülşen f Turkish
Turkish form of Golshan.
Gulshan m Indian, Hindi, Urdu
Hindi and Urdu form of Golshan.
Gülten f Turkish
Means "rose skin" in Turkish.
Gulumbu f Indigenous Australian, Yolngu
Meaning unknown, of Yolngu origin.
Gulzar m & f Urdu
Urdu form of Golzar.
Gumarich m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements guma meaning "man" and ric meaning "ruler, mighty".
Gun f Swedish
Modern form of Gunnr.
Gunārs m Latvian
Latvian form of Gunnar.
Günay f & m Turkish, Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic elements gün "sun" and ay "moon".
Gunborg f Swedish
From the Old Norse name Gunnbjǫrg, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Gunda f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund meaning "war".
Gundhram m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Guntram.
Gundisalvus m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Old Germanic (Latinized) form of Gonzalo.
Gundula f German
Originally a diminutive of Gunda.
Günel f Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic elements gün "sun" and el "country, society".
Gunhild f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
Gunilla f Swedish
Swedish variant of Gunhild.
Gunn f Norwegian, Swedish
Modern form of Gunnr.
Gunna f Danish, Old Norse
Feminine form of Gunne.
Gunnar m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr, which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of Günther). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
Gunnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunborg.
Gunne m Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element gunnr "war".
Gunnel f Swedish
Swedish variant of Gunhild.
Gunner m English (Modern)
English variant of Gunnar, influenced by the vocabulary word gunner.
Gunnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunhild.
Gunnhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Gunhild.
Gunni m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunne.
Gunnr f Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gunnr meaning "war". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Gunnvaldr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunvald.
Gunnvǫr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunvor.
Gunnvor f Norwegian
Variant of Gunvor.
Günter m German
Variant of Günther.
Gunter m German
Variant of Günther.
Günther m German, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied, which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
Gunther m German
Variant of Günther.
Guntram m German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
Guntur m Indonesian
Means "thunder" in Indonesian.
Gunvald m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Gunnvaldr, derived from gunnr "war" and valdr "power, leader, ruler".
Gunvor f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvǫr meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vǫr "vigilant, cautious".
Guo m & f Chinese
From Chinese (guó) meaning "country" or other Chinese characters pronounced in a similar way.
Guorthigirn m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Gwrtheyrn.
Gurdeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Gurgen m Armenian, Georgian
Derived from Middle Persian gurg "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several Georgian kings and princes.
Gurmeet m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and मित्र (mitra) meaning "friend".
Guro f Norwegian
Norwegian diminutive of Gudrun.
Gurpreet m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and प्रीति (priti) meaning "pleasure, joy, love".
Gürsel m Turkish
Means "flowing water" in Turkish.
Gurutz m Basque
Means "cross" in Basque.
Gurutze f Basque
Feminine form of Gurutz.
Gus 1 m English
Short form of Augustus or Angus.
Gus 2 m Greek (Expatriate)
Diminutive of Constantine, used primarily by Greek expatriates.
Gussie f English
Diminutive of Augusta.
Gust m Dutch
Dutch short form of Gustaaf or Augustus.
Gusta f Dutch
Short form of Augusta.
Gustaaf m Dutch
Dutch form of Gustav.
Gustaf m Swedish
Swedish variant of Gustav.
Gustav m Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German, Czech
Possibly means "staff of the Geats", derived from the Old Norse elements gautr "Geat, Goth" and stafr "staff". However, the root name Gautstafr is not well attested in the Old Norse period. Alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic name Gostislav. This name has been borne by six kings of Sweden, including the 16th-century Gustav I Vasa.
Gustave m French
French form of Gustav. This name was borne by the French artist Gustave Doré (1832-1883).
Gustavo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Gustav.
Gustavs m Latvian
Latvian form of Gustav.
Gustaw m Polish
Polish form of Gustav.
Gusti m Balinese
From a title meaning "leader" in Balinese.
Gusztáv m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Gustav.
Guðbrandr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gudbrand.
Guðfriðr m Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Godafrid.
Guðini m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Godwine.
Guðlaug f Old Norse, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements guð meaning "god" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
Guðleif f Old Norse
Feminine form of Guðleifr.
Guðleifr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gleb.
Guðmundr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gudmund.
Guðmundur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Gudmund.
Guðni m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Guðini.
Guðríðr f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements guð "god" and fríðr "beautiful".
Guðríður f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Guðríðr.
Guðrún f Old Norse, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Gudrun, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Guto m Welsh
Diminutive of Gruffudd.
Guus m Dutch
Dutch short form of Augustus or Gustaaf.
Guusje f Dutch
Feminine form of Guus.
Güvenç m Turkish
Means "trust" in Turkish.
Guwisti f Indigenous American, Cherokee
Derived from Cherokee ᎬᏫᏍᏓᏗ (gunwisdadi) meaning "sift, sieve".
Guy 1 m English, French
Norman French form of Wido. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels Guy Mannering (1815) by Walter Scott and The Heir of Redclyffe (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
Guy 2 m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew גַּיְא (see Gai). This is the more common transcription.
Gvidas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Guido.
Gwalchmai m Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwalch "hawk", possibly combined with Mai "May (the month)" or mai "field, plain". This is the name of a character in Welsh legend (appearing in Culhwch and Olwen for example). He is probably the antecedent of Gawain from later Arthurian romance.
Gwallter m Welsh
Welsh form of Walter.
Gwandoya m Eastern African, Ganda
Means "met with misery" in Luganda.
Ġwann m Maltese
Maltese form of Iohannes (see John).
Gwawl m Welsh Mythology
Means "wall" in Welsh. In the First Branch of the Mabinogi Gwawl is an unwelcome suitor of Rhiannon.
Gwawr f Welsh
Means "dawn" in Welsh.
Gwen f Welsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of Gwendolen, Gwenllian and other names beginning with Gwen.
Gwenaël m French, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and hael meaning "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
Gwenaëlle f French, Breton
Feminine form of Gwenaël.
Gwenda f Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 19th century.
Gwendal m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and tal meaning "brow, forehead".
Gwenddoleu m Welsh Mythology
From Old Welsh Guendoleu, possibly derived from gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dol (plural dolau) meaning "meadow". This was the name of a semi-legendary 6th-century king of Arfderydd in Cumbria. His defeat at the Battle of Arfderydd caused his bard Myrddin to go mad with grief.
Gwenddydd f Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dydd meaning "day". In medieval Welsh tales this is the name of Myrddin's sister. Geoffrey of Monmouth calls her Ganieda and also makes her the wife of Rhydderch Hael.
Gwendolen f Welsh
Possibly means "white ring", derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This name appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th-century chronicles, written in the Latin form Guendoloena, where it belongs to an ancient queen of the Britons who defeats her ex-husband in battle. Geoffrey later used it in Vita Merlini for the wife of the prophet Merlin. An alternate theory claims that the name arose from a misreading of the masculine name Guendoleu by Geoffrey.... [more]
Gwendolyn f English
Variant of Gwendolen. This is the usual spelling in the United States.
Gweneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenfrewi f Welsh (Rare)
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with another element of uncertain meaning. It could possibly be Welsh ffreu meaning "stream, flow" or the obscure word ffrewi meaning "pacify, quell, reconcile". This may be the original form of Winifred. In any case, it is the Welsh name for the saint.
Gwenhael m Medieval Breton
Old Breton form of Gwenaël.
Gwenith f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth, influenced by the Welsh word gwenith meaning "wheat".
Gwenllian f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and possibly lliain meaning "flaxen, made of linen" or lliant meaning "flow, flood". This name was used by medieval Welsh royalty, notably by a 12th-century princess of Deheubarth who died in battle with the Normans. It was also borne by the 13th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last prince of Gwynedd.
Gwenn f Breton
Breton cognate of Gwen.
Gwenneg m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Gwenneg was an 8th-century monk of Brittany.
Gwenneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenyth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwil m Welsh
Welsh short form of Gwilym.
Gwilherm m Breton
Breton form of William.
Gwilim m Welsh
Welsh variant of Gwilym.
Gwillym m Welsh
Welsh variant of Gwilym.
Gwilym m Welsh
Welsh form of William.
Gwladus f Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Gladys.
Gwladys f Welsh
Variant of Gladys.
Gwrtheyrn m Old Welsh (Modernized)
From Old Welsh Guorthigirn meaning "supreme king", from guor meaning "over" and tigirn meaning "king, monarch". It is possible that this is not a name, but a title. According to medieval chroniclers, Gwrtheyrn (also known as Vortigern) was a 5th-century king of the Britons. It was he who invited the brothers Hengist and Horsa to Britain, which eventually led to the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.
Gwydion m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Probably means "born of trees" from Old Welsh guid "trees" and the suffix gen "born of". In the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Gwydion is the nephew of King Math of Gwynedd, and like him a powerful magician. In an elaborate plot to give his brother a chance to rape his uncle's footbearer, he arranged a war between Gwynedd and the neighbouring kingdom of Dyfed. Gwydion himself killed King Pryderi of Dyfed at the end of the war. In punishment for the rape, Math transformed Gwydion and his brother into different animals over the course of three years. Gwydion was the uncle of Lleu Llaw Gyffes, whom he fostered. Math and Gwydion fashioned Lleu a wife, Blodeuwedd, out of flowers and they later aided him after her betrayal. Gwydion also appears in older Welsh poetry such as the Book of Taliesin.
Gwyn m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Gwyn was a king of the Otherworld and the leader of the Wild Hunt. He appears in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen, where he is one of the many who help Culhwch hunt the monstrous boar Trwyth. The story also tells of his rivalry with Gwythyr for the beautiful Creiddylad.
Gwynedd f & m Welsh
From the name of the kingdom of Gwynedd, which was located in northern Wales from the 5th century. It is now the name of a Welsh county. The name may be related to Old Irish Féni meaning "Irish people", itself possibly related to the Celtic root *wēnā meaning "band of warriors".
Gwyneira f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow". This is a recently created Welsh name.
Gwyneth f Welsh, English
Probably a variant of Gwynedd. It has been common in Wales since the 19th century, perhaps after the Welsh novelist Gwyneth Vaughan (1852-1910), whose real name was Ann Harriet Hughes. A modern famous bearer is the American actress Gwyneth Paltrow (1972-).
Gwynfor m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with maur meaning "great, large". This name was created in the 19th century.
Gwynn m Welsh
Variant of Gwyn.
Gwythyr m Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of Victor. This name appears in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen belonging to the rival of Gwyn for the maiden Creiddylad. Seeking peace between the two, King Arthur declared that Gwyn and Gwythyr shall only fight once each year on May Day.
Gyatso m Tibetan
From Tibetan རྒྱ་མཚོ (rgya-mtsho) meaning "ocean". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).
Gyda f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Gyða (see Gytha).
Gyeong m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city", (gyeong) meaning "scenery, view", (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour", or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
Gyeong-Hui f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour" and (hui) meaning "beauty". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Gyeong-Ja f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "congratulate, celebrate" or (gyeong) meaning "respect, honour" combined with (ja) meaning "child". This name can be formed of other hanja character combinations as well. Korean feminine names ending with the character (a fashionable name suffix in Japan, read as -ko in Japanese) became less popular after Japanese rule of Korea ended in 1945.
Gyeong-Suk f Korean
From Sino-Korean (gyeong) meaning "capital city" and (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Gyneth f Arthurian Romance
Perhaps a variant of Gwyneth, used by Walter Scott for the daughter of King Arthur and Guendolen in his poem The Bridal of Triermain (1813).
Gyöngyi f Hungarian
From Hungarian gyöngy meaning "pearl", of Turkic origin.
Gyöngyvér f Hungarian
Means "sister of pearl", from Hungarian gyöngy "pearl" and testvér "sibling". This name was created by the Hungarian poet János Arany for a character in his poem The Death of King Buda (1864).
György m Hungarian
Hungarian form of George.
Györgyi f Hungarian
Hungarian feminine form of George.
Györgyike f Hungarian
Diminutive of Györgyi.
Győző m Hungarian
Means "victor" in Hungarian.
Gypsy f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.
Gyða f Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Gytha.
Gytha f English (Archaic)
From Gyða, an Old Norse diminutive of Guðríðr. It was borne by a Danish noblewoman who married the English lord Godwin of Wessex in the 11th century. The name was used in England for a short time after that, and was revived in the 19th century.
Gyula m Hungarian
From a Hungarian royal title, which was probably of Turkic origin. This name is also used as a Hungarian form of Julius.
Gyuri m Hungarian
Diminutive of György.