Names Starting with G

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GERMAINEfFrench
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.
GERMÁNmSpanish
Spanish form of GERMANUS.
GERMAN (1)mEnglish
English form of GERMANUS.
GERMAN (2)mRussian
Russian form of HERMAN.
GERMANOmItalian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of GERMANUS.
GERMANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "brother" in Latin. This was the name of several early saints.
GERMOGENmRussian
Russian form of HERMOGENES.
GERMUNDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and mund "protection".
GERNOTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hnod "crush".
GEROmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear".
GEROLAMOmItalian
Italian form of JEROME.
GEROLFmDutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GEROLTmDutch
Dutch form of GERALD.
GERONIMOmHistory
From Gerónimo, a Spanish form of JEROME. This is the better-known name of the Apache leader Goyathlay (1829-1909). It was given to him by the Mexicans, his enemies.
GERONTIUSmLate Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Greek γερων (geron) "old man".
GERRITmDutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of GERARD.
GERRYm & fEnglish, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GERSHOMmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Probably means "exile" in Hebrew, though the Bible explains that it derives from גֵּר שָׁם (ger sham) meaning "a stranger there" (see Exodus 18:3). This is the name of a son of Moses in the Old Testament.
GERSHONmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Variant of GERSHOM. This is the name of a son of Levi in the Old Testament.
GERTmGerman, Dutch
German and Dutch short form of GERHARD.
GERTIEfEnglish, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
GERTRAUDfGerman
German form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRÚDfHungarian
Hungarian form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRÚDAfSlovak
Slovak form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRŪDAfLithuanian
Lithuanian form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDAfPolish, Czech
Polish and Czech form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDEfEnglish, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GERTRUDESfPortuguese
Portuguese form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDISfSpanish
Latinized form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUIDAfDutch
Dutch form of GERTRUDE.
GERULFmGerman (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GERVAISmFrench
French form of GERVASIUS.
GERVAISEfFrench (Rare)
French feminine form of GERVASIUS.
GERVASEmEnglish (Rare)
English form of GERVASIUS. The Normans introduced this name to England in the Middle Ages, though it has since become rare.
GERVÁSIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of GERVASIUS.
GERVASIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of GERVASIUS.
GERVASIUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name with a first element deriving from ger "spear". Saint Gervasius was an early martyr from Milan whose remains were discovered in the 4th century.
GERWAZYmPolish
Polish form of GERVASIUS.
GESSICAfItalian
Italian variant of JESSICA.
GETHINmWelsh
Means "dark-skinned, swarthy" in Welsh.
GETHSEMANEfVarious
From a biblical place name, the garden where Jesus was arrested, located on the Mount of Olives near Jerusalem. It is derived from Γεθσημανι (Gethsemani), the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "oil vat". It is very rarely used as a given name.
GEULAfHebrew
Means "redemption" in Hebrew.
GEVORGmArmenian
Armenian form of GEORGE.
GÉZAmHungarian
From Gyeücsa, possibly derived from a diminutive form of the Hungarian noble title gyevü or gyeü, itself from Turkic jabgu. This was the name of a 10th-century leader of the Hungarians, the father of the first king István.
GEZABELEfBiblical Italian
Form of JEZEBEL used in some versions of the Italian Bible.
GHADAfArabic
Means "graceful woman" in Arabic.
GHADIRfArabic
Means "stream" in Arabic.
GHALIBmArabic
Means "conqueror" in Arabic.
GHALIYAfArabic
Means "precious, valuable" in Arabic.
GHASSANmArabic
Means "youth" in Arabic. This was the name of an Arabian tribe that existed until the 6th century.
GHAYTHmArabic
Means "rain" in Arabic.
GHENADIEmRomanian
Romanian form of GENNADIUS.
GHEORGHEmRomanian
Romanian form of GEORGE.
GHISLAINmFrench
French form of Gislenus, a Latinized form of the Germanic name Gislin, derived from the element gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This was the name of a 7th-century Belgian saint.
GHISLAINEfFrench
Feminine form of GHISLAIN.
GHIȚĂmRomanian
Diminutive of GHEORGHE.
GHJASEPPUmCorsican
Corsican form of JOSEPH.
GHJULIAfCorsican
Corsican form of JULIA.
GHJUVANmCorsican
Corsican form of JOHN.
GHJUVANNAfCorsican
Corsican form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
GHJUVANNImCorsican
Corsican form of JOHN.
GHOLAMmPersian
Persian form of GHULAM.
GHONCHEHfPersian
Means "flower bud" in Persian.
GHUFRANf & mArabic
Means "forgiveness" in Arabic.
GHULAMmArabic, Urdu, Pashto
Means "servant, boy" in Arabic. It is often used as the first part of compound names.
GIAfItalian
Diminutive of GIANNA.
GIACINTAfItalian
Italian feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
GIACINTOmItalian
Italian form of HYACINTHUS.
GIACOBBEmItalian
Italian form of Iacobus (see JACOB).
GIACOMAfItalian
Feminine form of GIACOMO.
GIACOMINAfItalian
Feminine form of GIACOMO.
GIACOMOmItalian
Italian form of Iacomus (see JAMES).
GIADAfItalian
Italian form of JADE.
GIAMBATTISTAmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and BATTISTA, given in honour of Saint John the Baptist.
GIAMPAOLOmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and PAOLO.
GIAMPIEROmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and PIERO.
GIANmItalian
Short form of GIOVANNI.
GIANCARLOmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and CARLO.
GIANFRANCOmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and FRANCO (2).
GIANGf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (giang) meaning "river".
GIANLUCAmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and LUCA (1).
GIANLUIGImItalian
Combination of GIANNI and LUIGI.
GIANMARCOmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and MARCO.
GIANMARIAmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and MARIA.
GIANNAfItalian, Greek
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a modern Greek variant of IOANNA.
GIANNImItalian, Greek
Italian short form of GIOVANNI and a modern Greek variant of IOANNIS.
GIANNINAfItalian
Diminutive of GIOVANNA.
GIANNINOmItalian
Diminutive of GIOVANNI.
GIANNISmGreek
Modern Greek variant of Ioannes (see JOHN).
GIANPAOLOmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and PAOLO.
GIANPIEROmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and PIERO.
GIBmEnglish
Medieval diminutive of GILBERT.
GIDEONmBiblical, English, Hebrew
Means "feller, hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GIDIEmMedieval French
Medieval French form of Aegidius (see GILES).
GIEDRĖfLithuanian
Feminine form of GIEDRIUS.
GIEDRIUSmLithuanian
Derived from Lithuanian giedras meaning "serene, clear".
GIFFARDmEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GEBHARD.
GIGIfFrench
French diminutive of GEORGINE or VIRGINIE.
GIIWEDINOKWEfNative American, Ojibwe
Means "woman of the north" in Ojibwe.
GIJSmDutch
Short form of GIJSBERT.
GIJSBERTmDutch
Dutch variant of GISBERT.
GIL (1)mSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GILES.
GIL (2)mEnglish
Short form of GILBERT and other names beginning with Gil.
GIL (3)mHebrew
Means "joy, happiness" in Hebrew.
GILAHfHebrew
Feminine form of GIL (3).
GILBERTmEnglish, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILBERTEfFrench
French feminine form of GILBERT.
GILBERTOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of GILBERT.
GILCHRISTmScottish
Derived from the Gaelic phrase giolla Chríost meaning "servant of Christ".
GILDAfItalian, Portuguese
Originally an Italian short form of names containing the Germanic element gild meaning "sacrifice, value".
GILEADmBiblical
From an Old Testament place name meaning "heap of witness" in Hebrew. This was a mountainous region east of the Jordan River. Besides being a place name, it is also borne by people in the Bible.
GILESmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.
GILGAMESHmSumerian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Possibly means "the ancestor is a hero", from Sumerian 𒉋𒂵 (bilga) meaning "ancestor" and 𒈩 (mes) meaning "hero, young man". This was the name of a Sumerian hero, later appearing in the Akkadian poem the 'Epic of Gilgamesh'. Gilgamesh, with his friend Enkidu, battled the giant Humbaba and stopped the rampage of the Bull of Heaven, besides other adventures. Gilgamesh was probably based on a real person: a king of Uruk who ruled around the 27th century BC.
GILIf & mHebrew
Means "my joy" in Hebrew.
GILLfEnglish
Short form of GILLIAN.
GILLESmFrench
French form of GILES.
GILLESPIEmScottish
Anglicized form of Scottish Gille Easbaig or Irish Giolla Easpuig both meaning "servant of the bishop".
GILLIANfEnglish
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.
GILLISmDutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of GILES.
GILROYmIrish, Scottish
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
GILTBERTmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements gild "sacrifice, value" and beraht "bright".
GINAfItalian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
GINETTEfFrench
Diminutive of GENEVIÈVE.
GINEVRAfItalian
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GINGERfEnglish
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GINNIEfEnglish
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GINNYfEnglish
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GINOmItalian
Italian short form of names ending in gino.
GINTARASmLithuanian
Means "amber" in Lithuanian.
GINTARĖfLithuanian
Feminine form of GINTARAS.
GIOACCHINOmItalian
Italian form of JOACHIM.
GIOACHINOmItalian
Italian form of JOACHIM. A famous bearer was the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868).
GIOBBEmBiblical Italian
Italian form of JOB.
GIOCONDAfItalian
From the Late Latin name Iucunda which meant "pleasant, delightful, happy". Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' is also known as 'La Gioconda' because its subject is Lisa del Giocondo.
GIOELEmItalian
Italian form of JOEL.
GIOIAfItalian
Means "joy" in Italian.
GIONAmItalian
Italian form of JONAH.
GIONATAmItalian
Italian form of JONATHAN.
GIORDANOmItalian
Italian form of JORDAN.
GIORGImGeorgian
Georgian form of GEORGE. This was the name of several kings of Georgia.
GIORGIAfItalian
Italian feminine form of GEORGE.
GIORGINAfItalian
Diminutive of GIORGIA.
GIORGINOmItalian
Diminutive of GIORGIO.
GIORGIOmItalian
Italian form of GEORGE.
GIORGOSmGreek
Modern Greek variant of Georgios (see GEORGE).
GIOSUÈmItalian
Italian form of JOSHUA.
GIOTTOmItalian
Possibly from Ambrogiotto, a diminutive of AMBROGIO, or Angiolotto, a diminutive of ANGIOLO. This name was borne by Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), an Italian painter and architect.
GIOVANNAfItalian
Italian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA), making it the feminine form of GIOVANNI.
GIOVANNImItalian
Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516) and the painter and sculptor Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) were two famous bearers of this name.
GIRALDOmItalian
Italian form of GERALD.
GIRISHAmHinduism
Means "lord of the mountain" in Sanskrit. This is a name of the Hindu god Shiva, given because of his abode in the Himalayan Mountains.
GIROLAMOmItalian
Italian form of JEROME.
GISAfGerman
German short form of GISELLE.
GISBERTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GISELAfGerman, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of GISELLE.
GISELBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GILBERT.
GISÈLEfFrench
French variant of GISELLE.
GISELLAfItalian
Italian form of GISELLE.
GISELLEfFrench, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage, pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GISELMUNDmAncient Germanic
From the Germanic elements gisil meaning "hostage, pledge" and mund meaning "protection".
GISILAfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GISELLE.
GISILBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GILBERT.
GISILFRIDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements gisil "hostage" and frid "peace".
GISLENUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Gislin (see GHISLAIN).
GISLINmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of GHISLAIN.
GISMUNDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name, possibly a variant of GISELMUND or SIGISMUND using shortened forms of the initial element.
GITAfIndian, Hindi
Means "song" in Sanskrit. The word appears in the name of the 'Bhagavad Gita', a sacred text of Hinduism (meaning "divine song").
GITTAfGerman, Hungarian
German short form of BRIGITTA and a Hungarian short form of MARGIT.
GITTANfSwedish
Swedish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
GITTEfDanish
Danish short form of BIRGITTE.
GITTELfYiddish
Means "good" in Yiddish.
GIUANNAfSardinian
Sardinian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
GIUANNEmSardinian
Sardinian form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
GIUDITTAfItalian
Italian form of JUDITH.
GIULIAfItalian
Italian feminine form of JULIUS.
GIULIANAfItalian
Feminine form of GIULIANO.
GIULIANOmItalian
Italian form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
GIULIETTAfItalian
Diminutive of GIULIA.
GIULIOmItalian
Italian form of JULIUS.
GIUSEPPAfItalian
Feminine form of GIUSEPPE.
GIUSEPPEmItalian
Italian form of JOSEPH. Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) was a military leader who united Italy in the 19th century.
GIUSEPPINAfItalian
Feminine form of GIUSEPPE.
GIUSTINAfItalian
Italian feminine form of JUSTIN.
GIUSTINOmItalian
Italian form of JUSTIN.
GIVImGeorgian
Meaning unknown, possibly of Persian origin.
GIZELLAfHungarian
Hungarian form of GISELLE.
GİZEMfTurkish
Means "mystery" in Turkish.
GIZIfHungarian
Hungarian diminutive of GISELLE.
GJERGJmAlbanian
Albanian form of GEORGE.
GJONmAlbanian
Albanian form of JOHN.
GJORDmSwedish (Rare)
Contracted form of GUÐFRIÐR.
GJORGJImMacedonian
Macedonian form of GEORGE.
GJURDmNorwegian (Rare)
Contracted form of GUÐFRIÐR.
GLADWINmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADYSfWelsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel 'Puck' (1870).
GLÆDWINEmAnglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GLANVILLEmEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman place name which possibly meant "domain of (a person named) Gland" in Old French.
GLÁUCIAfPortuguese
Feminine form of GLÁUCIO.
GLAUCIAm & fAncient Roman
Latin form of GLÁUCIO.
GLÁUCIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of the Roman cognomen Glaucia, which was derived from Latin glaucus "bluish grey", ultimately from Greek.
GLAUCOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of GLAUCUS.
GLAUCUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Γλαυκος (Glaukos), a name meaning "bluish grey". This was the name of a Greek sea god, as well as other characters in Greek legend.
GLAWm & fWelsh
Means "rain" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
GLEBmRussian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of the Old Norse name Guðleifr, which was derived from the elements guð "god" and leifr "heir".
GLENDAfWelsh, English
A name created in the 20th century from the Welsh elements glân "pure, clean" and da "good".
GLENDOWERmWelsh
Anglicized form of GLYNDWR.
GLENICEfWelsh
Variant of GLENYS.
GLENNmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
GLENNAfScottish, English
Feminine form of GLENN.
GLENNISfWelsh
Variant of GLENYS.
GLENYSfWelsh
Elaboration of the Welsh word glân meaning "pure, clean, holy". This name was created in the late 19th century.
GLIGORmMacedonian
Macedonian form of GREGORY.
GLOOSCAPmNew World Mythology
Derived from an Eastern Algonquian phrase meaning "man from nothing". Glooscap (or Gluskabe) was a hero involved in the creation myths of the Wabanaki people of eastern North America.
GLÓRIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of GLORIA.
GLORIAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, German
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.... [more]
GLORIANAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
GLORINDAfEsperanto
Means "worthy of glory" in Esperanto.
GLORYfEnglish (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
GLUKEfYiddish
Means "good luck" in Yiddish.
GLUKELfYiddish
Diminutive of GLUKE.
GLYKERIAfGreek
Derived from Greek γλυκυς (glykys) meaning "sweet".
GLYNmWelsh
Means "valley" in Welsh.
GLYNDWRmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley water". This name is often given in honour of Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century Welsh patriot who led a revolt against England.
GLYNISfWelsh
Either a variant of GLENYS or an elaboration of the Welsh word glyn meaning "valley".
GLYNNmWelsh
Variant of GLYN.
GNAEUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown Etruscan meaning, though it may be related to Latin naevus "birthmark". A famous bearer was Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, also known as Pompey the Great, a Roman general of the 1st century BC.
GOBÁNmIrish
Either means "little smith" from Irish gobha "smith" combined with a diminutive suffix, or else derived from the name of the Irish god GOIBNIU (which is also a derivative of gobha).
GOBINDmIndian (Sikh), Hindi
Variant of GOVINDA used in northern India. This was the name of the last Sikh guru, Gobind Singh (1666-1708).
GOBINDAmBengali
Bengali form of GOVINDA.
GOBINETfIrish
Variant of GOBNAIT.
GOBNAITfIrish
Feminine form of GOBÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish abbess, the patron saint of Ballyvourney.
GOBNATAfHistory
Latinate form of GOBNAIT.
GOBNETfIrish
Anglicized form of GOBNAIT.
GOCHAmGeorgian
Meaning unknown, possibly from a Georgian dialectal word meaning "old man".
GODAm & fAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element god meaning "good".
GODABERTmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and beraht "bright".
GODDARDmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GODEHARD.
GODEFROYmFrench
French form of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GODEHARDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and hard "hardy, brave". This was the name of an 11th-century saint who was a bishop of Hildesheim.
GODELIEVEfDutch
Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA.
GODELIVAfAncient Germanic
Feminine form of GOTELEIB. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.
GODFREYmEnglish
From the Germanic name Godafrid, which meant "peace of god" from the Germanic elements god "god" and frid "peace". The Normans brought this name to England, where it became common during the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was Godfrey of Bouillon, an 11th-century leader of the First Crusade and the first ruler of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.
GODFRIEDmDutch
Dutch cognate of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GODGIFUfAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of GODIVA.
GODIVAfAnglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
GODOFREDOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GODFREY.
GODRICmAnglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman conquest.
GODTFREDmNorwegian
Norwegian form of GODFREY.
GODWINEmAnglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend". This was the name of the powerful 11th-century Earl of Wessex, the father of King Harold II of England.
GOFFREDOmItalian
Italian form of GODFREY.
GOFRAIDHmIrish
Irish form of GODFREY.
GOGAmGeorgian
Diminutive of GIORGI.
GOGImGeorgian
Diminutive of GIORGI.
GOHARfArmenian
Means "jewel" in Armenian, ultimately of Persian origin.
GOIBNIUmIrish Mythology
Derived from Irish gobha meaning "smith". This was the name of the Irish smith god, a provider of weapons for the Tuatha De Danann. He was also skilled at brewing beer.
GOIZANEfBasque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning".
GOIZARGIfBasque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning" and argi "light".
GOIZEDERfBasque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning" and eder "beautiful".
GÖKERmTurkish
From Turkish gök meaning "sky" and er meaning "brave man".
GÖKHANmTurkish
From Turkish gök meaning "sky" and han, which is from the title khan meaning "leader".
GÖKSUmTurkish
From Turkish gök meaning "sky" and su meaning "water".
GOLfPersian
Means "flower, rose" in Persian.
GOLBAHARfPersian
Means "spring rose" in Persian.
GOLDAfYiddish
Means "gold" in Yiddish.
GOLDIE (1)fEnglish
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
GOLIATHmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Hebrew גָּלְיָת (Golyat), possibly derived from גָּלָה (galah) meaning "uncover, reveal". This is the name of the giant Philistine who is slain by David in the Old Testament.
GOLNARfPersian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) "flower, rose" and انار (anar) "pomegranate".
GOLNARAfTatar
Tatar form of GOLNAR.
GOLNAZfPersian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) "flower, rose" and ناز (naz) "pride".
GOLSHANf & mPersian
Means "rose garden" in Persian.
GOLZARm & fPersian
Means "rose cheeked" in Persian.
GOMERm & fBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "complete" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a grandson of Noah and the unfaithful wife of the prophet Hosea.
GOMESmMedieval Portuguese
Medieval Portuguese form of the Visigothic name Goma, derived from the Germanic element guma meaning "man".
GONAfKurdish
Means "cheek" in Kurdish.
GONCAfTurkish
Turkish form of GHONCHEH.