Celtic Mythology Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of the Celtic peoples. See Irish mythology and Welsh mythology for more specific lists.
gender
usage
ÁEDÁN m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of AODHÁN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Scots.
AGRONA f Celtic Mythology (Hypothetical)
Perhaps derived from an old Celtic element agro meaning "battle, slaughter". This is possibly the name of a Brythonic goddess for whom the River Ayr in Scotland was named.
AILILL m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of Queen Medb.
ANDRASTE f Celtic Mythology (Hellenized)
Possibly means "invincible" in Celtic. According to the Greco-Roman historian Cassius Dio, this was the name of a Briton goddess of victory who was invoked by Boudicca before her revolt.
ANGHARAD f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.
AODH m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
AODHÁN m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán meaning "little fire", a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century. It was also borne by several characters in Irish mythology.
AOIFE f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "beauty" from the Irish word aoibh. In Irish legend Aoife was a warrior princess. In war against her sister Scathach, she was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn. Eventually she was reconciled with her sister and became the lover of Cúchulainn. This name is sometimes used as a Gaelic form of EVE or EVA.
AONGHUS m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly meaning "one strength" derived from Irish óen "one" and gus "force, strength, energy". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was the Irish god of love and youth. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king and several Irish kings.
ARAWN m Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the god of the underworld, called Annwfn, in Welsh mythology.
ARIANRHOD f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes. In earlier myths she was a goddess of the moon.
ARTHUR m English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.... [more]
BÉBINN f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fair lady" in Irish. This name was borne by several characters in Irish mythology, including a goddess of childbirth.
BEDIVERE m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Bedwyr, which is of unknown meaning. In Arthurian legends Bedivere was one of the original companions of King Arthur. He first appears in early Welsh tales, and his story was later expanded by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century. He is the one who throws the sword Excalibur into the lake at the request of the dying Arthur.
BELENUS m Gaulish Mythology
Probably from a Celtic word meaning "bright, brilliant". This was the name of a Gaulish solar god who was often equated with Apollo.
BELI m Welsh Mythology
Probably a Welsh derivative of BELENUS. Beli Mawr was a Welsh ancestor deity who established several royal lines in Wales.
BILE m Irish Mythology
Possibly an Irish form of BELENUS, though it may derive from an Irish word meaning "hero". In Irish mythology this was the name of one of the Milesians who was drowned while invading Ireland.
BLÁTHNAT f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little flower" from the Irish word blath "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but she was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.
BLODEUWEDD f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "face of flowers" in Welsh. In a story in the Mabinogion, she is created out of flowers by Gwydion to be the wife of his nephew Lleu Llaw Gyffes. She is eventually changed into an owl for her infidelity.
BRAN (1) m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
BRAN (2) m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Bran the Blessed (called also Bendigeid Vran) was the son of the god Llyr. Later Welsh legends describe him as a king of Britain who was killed attacking Ireland.
BRANWEN f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh brân "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRIDGET f Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRIGID f Irish, Irish Mythology
Irish variant of Brighid (see BRIDGET).
BRIGIT f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of BRIDGET.
CÁEL m Irish Mythology
From Irish caol meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
CÉIBHFHIONN f Irish Mythology
Means "fair locks" in Irish. This was the name of an Irish goddess of inspiration.
CERNUNNOS m Gaulish Mythology (Latinized)
Means "horned" in Celtic. This was the name of the Celtic god of fertility, animals, wealth, and the underworld. He was usually depicted having antlers, and was identified with the Roman god Mercury.
CIAN m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "ancient" in Irish. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
CLÍDNA f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of CLÍODHNA.
CLÍODHNA f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "shapely" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend this was the name of a beautiful goddess. She fell in love with a mortal named Ciabhan and left the Land of Promise with him, but when she arrived on the other shore she was swept to sea by a great wave.
CONALL m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Irish. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CONCHOBAR m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Original Irish form of CONOR.
CONCHOBHAR m Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of CONCHOBAR.
CONCHÚR m Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of CONOR.
CONLAOCH m Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Irish conn "chief" and flaith "lord". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including a son of Cúchulainn who was accidentally killed by his father.
CONOR m Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Conchobar, derived from Old Irish con "hound, dog, wolf" and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CÚCHULAINN m Irish Mythology
Means "hound of Culann" in Irish. This was the usual name of the warrior hero who was named Sétanta at birth, given to him because he took the place of one of Culann's hounds after he accidentally killed it. Irish legend tells of Cúchulainn's many adventures, including his single-handed defense of Ulster against the army of Queen Medb.
CULHWCH m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "hiding place of the pig" in Welsh. In Welsh legend he was the lover of Olwen the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Before the giant would allow Culhwch to marry his daughter, he insisted that Culhwch complete a series of extremely difficult tasks. Culhwch managed to complete them, and he returned to marry Olwen and kill the giant. This tale appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
DAGDA m Irish Mythology
Means "good god" in Celtic. In Irish myth Dagda (called also The Dagda) was the powerful god of the earth, knowledge, magic, abundance and treaties, a leader of the Tuatha De Danann. He was skilled in combat and healing and possessed a huge club, the handle of which could revive the dead.
DÁIRE m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
DEIRDRE f English, Irish, Irish Mythology
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from Old Irish der meaning "daughter". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.... [more]
DIARMAID m Irish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.
DOIREANN f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "sullen, tempestuous" in Irish. This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a daughter of Bodb Derg who poisoned Fionn mac Cumhail.
DYLAN m Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.... [more]
ÉBER m Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of ÉIBHEAR.
ÉIBHEAR m Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown. According to Irish legend this name belonged to two of the sons of Míl, Éibhear Dunn and Éibhear Finn, the first of the Gaels to conquer Ireland.
EIGYR f Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of IGRAINE.
ÉIMHEAR f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of EMER.
EMER f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from Irish eimh meaning "swift". In Irish legend she was the wife of Cúchulainn. She was said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, needlework, wisdom and chastity.
ENID f Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
EOGHAN m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "born from the yew tree" in Irish, though it is possibly derived from EUGENE. It was borne by several legendary or semi-legendary Irish figures, including a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages.
EPONA f Gaulish Mythology
Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.
ÉRIU f Irish Mythology
From the name of an Irish goddess, who according to legend gave her name to Ireland (which is called Éire in Irish). In reality, the goddess probably got her name from that of the island, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
ÉTAÍN f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Irish ét meaning "jealousy". In Irish mythology she is the subject of the 9th-century tale The Wooing of Étaín. She was the wife of Midir, but his jealous first wife Fuamnach transformed her into a fly. She was accidentally swallowed, and then reborn to the woman who swallowed her. After she grew again to adulthood she married the Irish high king Eochaid Airem, having no memory of Midir. Midir and Étaín were eventually reunited after Midir defeated Eochaid in a game of chess.
FACHTNA m Irish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "hostile" in Irish. He was the husband of Neasa in Irish legend. Some versions of the legends also have him as the father of Conchobhar.
FEARGHAS m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Irish elements fear "man" and gus "vigour". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including the Ulster hero Fearghas mac Róich.
FEIDELM f Irish Mythology
Possibly a feminine form of FEIDLIMID. This name is borne by several women in Irish legend including Feidelm Noíchrothach, a daughter of Conchobhar the king of Ulster.
FEIDLIMID m & f Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "beauty" or "ever good" in Irish. This was the name of three early kings of Munster.
FIACHRA m Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners, a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France.
FINN (1) m Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
FINTAN m Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FIONN m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Irish fionn (older Irish finn) meaning "fair" or "white". Fionn mac Cumhail was a legendary Irish hero who became all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon. He fought against the giant Fomors with his son Oisín and grandson Oscar.
FIONNUALA f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Irish fionn "white, fair" and guala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
GERAINT m Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, possibly a Welsh form of GERONTIUS. This was the name of a figure various Welsh legends. He was also incorporated into later Arthurian tales as one of the Knights of the Round Table and the husband of Enid.
GOIBNIU m Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish gobha meaning "smith". This was the name of the Irish smith god, a provider of weapons for the Tuatha De Danann. He was also skilled at brewing beer.
GORONWY m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, he was the lover of Blodeuwedd. He attempted to murder her husband Lleu Llaw Gyffes but was himself killed.
GOVANNON m Welsh Mythology
Welsh cognate of GOIBNIU.
GRÁINNE f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Gaelic grán meaning "grain". This was the name of an ancient Irish grain goddess. The name also belonged to the fiancée of Fionn mac Cumhail and the lover of Diarmaid in later Irish legend, and it is often associated with gráidh meaning "love".
GWALCHMEI m Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwalch "hawk", possibly combined with mei "May (the month)". This is the name of a character in Welsh legend. He is probably the antecedent of Gawain from Arthurian romance.
GWYDION m Welsh Mythology
Means "born of trees" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, Gwydion was the nephew of Math, and like him a powerful magician. He was the uncle of Lleu Llaw Gyffes, for whom he fashioned a wife, Blodeuwedd, out of flowers.
KAY (2) m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Cai or Cei, possibly a form of the Roman name GAIUS. Sir Kay was one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He first appears in Welsh tales as a brave companion of Arthur. In later medieval tales, notably those by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, he is portrayed as an unrefined boor.
LER m Irish Mythology
Irish cognate of LLYR. Ler was an Irish god of the sea, the father of Manannan mac Lir.
LIR m Irish Mythology (Anglicized)
Variant of LER based on the genitive case of the name.
LLEU m Welsh Mythology
Probably a Welsh form of LUGUS. In the Mabinogion, Lleu Llaw Gyffes is the son of Arianrhod. He was raised by his uncle Gwydion, who helped him overcome the curses that his mother placed upon him.
LLEW m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of LLEU. It can also be a short form of LLEWELYN. It coincides with the Welsh word llew meaning "lion".
LLYR m Welsh Mythology
Means "the sea" in Welsh. This was the name of the Welsh god of the sea. He possibly forms the basis for the legendary King Lear of the Britons.
LÓEGAIRE m Irish Mythology, Ancient Irish
Means "calf herder", derived from Irish loagh "calf". In Irish mythology Lóegaire Búadach was an Ulster warrior. He saved the life of the poet Áed, but died in the process. This was also the name of several Irish high kings.
m Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of LUGH.
LUG m Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of LUGH.
LUGAID m Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of LUGHAIDH.
LUGH m Irish Mythology
Probably an Irish form of LUGUS. In Irish mythology Lugh was a divine hero who led the Tuatha De Danann against the Fomorians who were led by his grandfather Balor. Lugh killed Balor by shooting a stone into his giant eye.
LUGHAIDH m Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from the name of the Irish god LUGH. This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including the king Lughaidh mac Con.
LUGUS m Gaulish Mythology
Probably from early Celtic meaning "light", ultimately from the Indo-European root *leuk "light, brightness". This was the name of a Celtic (Gaulish) god of commerce and craftsmanship, who was equated by the Romans with Mercury. He probably forms the basis for the characters and names of Lugh (Irish) and Lleu (Welsh).
LUNED f Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.
MABON m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh mab meaning "son". This was the name of an old Celtic god.
MAEVE f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
MATH m Welsh Mythology
Possibly from Celtic matu meaning "bear". According to the Mabinogion, Math ap Mathonwy was a king of Gwynedd and a magician. He was the uncle of the hero Gwydion.
MEDB f Irish Mythology
Original Irish form of MAEVE.
MORDRED m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From Welsh Medraut, possibly from Latin moderatus meaning "controlled, moderated". In Arthurian legend Mordred was the illegitimate son (in some versions nephew) of King Arthur. Mordred first appears briefly (as Medraut) in the 10th-century Annales Cambriae, but he was not portrayed as a traitor until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth. While Arthur is away he seduces his wife Guinevere and declares himself king. This prompts the battle of Camlann, which leads to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur.
MORRIGAN f Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MUIRENN f Irish, Irish Mythology
Either derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and fionn "fair, white", or else a variant of MUIRNE.
MUIRGEN f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "born of the sea" in Irish. In Irish legend this was the name of a woman (originally named Líban) who was transformed into a mermaid. After 300 years she was brought to shore, baptized, and transformed back into a woman.
MUIRNE f Irish Mythology
Means "festive" in Irish. In Irish legend this was the name of the mother of Fionn mac Cumhail.
MYRDDIN m Welsh Mythology
Original Welsh form of MERLIN.
NAOISE m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.
NEAS f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of NEASA.
NEASA f Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning uncertain. In Irish legend she was the mother of Conchobhar, king of Ulster. According to some versions of the legend she was originally named Assa meaning "gentle", but was renamed Ni-assa "not gentle" after she sought to avenge the murders of her foster fathers.
NECHTAN m Irish Mythology, Ancient Celtic
Celtic name of uncertain meaning, possibly meaning "damp" (cognate with NEPTUNE). In Irish mythology Nechtan was the husband of Boand, the goddess of the River Boyne. This name was also borne by the 5th-century Saint Nectan of Hartland in Devon, who was supposedly born in Ireland. It was also the name of several kings of the Picts.
NESS (1) f Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of NEAS.
NESSA (3) f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of NEASA.
NIAMH f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
NUADA m Irish Mythology
Possibly means "to acquire" in Irish. In Irish mythology he was a divine leader of the Tuatha De Danann. After he lost an arm in battle it was replaced with one made from silver. He was later killed in battle against the Fomorians.
NUDD m Welsh Mythology
Welsh cognate of NUADA.
OISÍN m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.
OSCAR m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OWAIN m Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though other theories connect it to Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
PARTHALÁN m Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly from BARTHOLOMEW. In Irish legend he was the first man on Ireland after the biblical flood.
PEREDUR m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.
PRYDERI m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "care" in Welsh. According to Welsh legend this was the name of the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. A central character in the Mabinogion, he succeeds his father as king of Dyfed, but is ultimately killed in single combat with Gwydion.
PWYLL m Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh mythology, Pwyll is a king of Dyfed who pursues and finally marries Rhiannon.
RHIANNON f Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RIGANTONA f Celtic Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed old Celtic form of RHIANNON.
RÍOGHNACH f Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish ríoghan meaning "queen". In Irish legend this was a wife of the Irish king Niall.
SABIA f Irish Mythology
Latinized form of SADB.
SADB f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "sweet, goodly" in Irish. In Irish mythology Sadb was the mother of Oisín.
SADHBH f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of SADB.
SIONANN f Irish Mythology
The name of an Irish goddess, a granddaughter of Lir, who was the personification of the River Shannon. Her name is derived from the name of the river (see SHANNON).
SLÁINE f & m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "health" in Irish. This was the name of a legendary high king of Ireland.
TARANIS m Gaulish Mythology
Derived from Celtic taran meaning "thunder", cognate with Þórr (see THOR). This was the name of the Gaulish thunder god, who was often identified with the Roman god Jupiter.
URIEN m Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Means "privileged birth" from Celtic orbo "privileged" and gen "birth". In Welsh legend and Arthurian romances Urien is a king of Gore and the husband of Morgan le Fay.
UTHER m Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Uthyr, derived from Welsh uthr meaning "terrible". In Arthurian legend Uther was the father of King Arthur. He appears in some early Welsh texts, but is chiefly known from the 12th-century chronicles of Geoffrey of Monmouth.