Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keywords bright or light or shining or white.
gender
usage
meaning
Aberash f Eastern African, Amharic
Means "giving off light, shining" in Amharic.
Abha f Indian, Hindi
Means "splendour, light" in Sanskrit.
Abner m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "my father is a light" in Hebrew, from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and נֵר (ner) meaning "lamp, light". In the Old Testament, Abner was a cousin of Saul and the commander of his army. After he killed Asahel he was himself slain by Asahel's brother Joab. It has been used as an English Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation. It was popular with the Puritans, who brought it to America in the 17th century.
Aegle f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αἴγλη (Aigle), which meant "light, radiance, glory". This was the name of several characters in Greek myth, including one of the Heliades and one of the Hesperides.
Aeronwen f Welsh (Rare)
Combination of Aeron and the Welsh element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
Ailbhe f & m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Ailbe, possibly derived from the old Celtic root *albiyo- "world, light, white" or Old Irish ail "rock". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint, the founder of a monastery at Emly.
Airi 1 f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
Akari f Japanese
From Japanese (aka) meaning "bright" or (aka) meaning "vermilion red" combined with (ri) meaning "village" or (ri) meaning "white jasmine". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Akemi f Japanese
From Japanese (ake) meaning "bright" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Aki 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
Akihiko m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) or (aki) both meaning "bright" combined with (hiko) meaning "boy, prince". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Akihito m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) or (aki) both meaning "bright" combined with (hito) meaning "compassionate". Other kanji combinations are possible. Akihito (1933-), name written , was the emperor of Japan from 1989 to 2019.
Akiko f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
Akimitsu m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "bright" and (mitsu) meaning "light". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
Akio m Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "bright, luminous" combined with (o) meaning "man, husband", (o) meaning "male" or (o) meaning "hero, manly". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Akira m & f Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
Ákos m Hungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "white falcon". This was the name of a medieval Hungarian clan.
Alban m German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus, which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
Albert m English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert meaning "noble and bright", composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
Albus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "white, bright" in Latin.
Alphius m Late Roman
Meaning unknown, possibly a variant of Alphaeus, or possibly from an Umbrian root meaning "white". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Sicily.
Alpin m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic name Ailpean, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
Amalbert m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements amal meaning "work, labour" and beraht meaning "bright".
Amandeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Punjabi ਅਮਨ (aman) meaning "peace" (ultimately from Arabic) and Sanskrit दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Amardeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit अमर (amara) meaning "immortal" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Amaterasu f Japanese Mythology
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and (terasu) meaning "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. She was born when Izanagi washed his left eye after returning from the underworld. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.
Andebert m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic element and meaning "wrath, zeal" combined with beraht meaning "bright".
Anwar m Arabic, Urdu, Indonesian
Means "brighter, more luminous" in Arabic. This name was borne by Egyptian president Anwar Sadat (1918-1981), who was assassinated three years after being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
Anwen f Welsh
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh, from the intensive prefix an- combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
Aoibheann f Irish
From Old Irish Oébfinn or Aíbinn, derived from oíb meaning "beauty, appearance, form" and finn meaning "fair, white". This was the name of the mother of Saint Énna of Aran. It was also borne by the daughter of the 10th-century Irish high king Donnchad Donn.
Apollo m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ἀπόλλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to the Indo-European root *apelo- meaning "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb ἀπόλλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
Arash m Persian, Persian Mythology
Possibly means either "truthfulness" or "bright" in Persian. In Persian legend Arash was a Persian archer who was ordered by the Turans to shoot an arrow, the landing place of which would determine the new location of the Persian-Turan border. Arash climbed a mountain and fired his arrow with such strength that it flew for several hours and landed on the banks of the far-away Oxus River.
Areg m Armenian
Means "sun, bright" in Armenian (a poetic word).
Argi m Basque
Means "light" in Basque.
Argider m Basque
Derived from Basque argi "light" and eder "beautiful".
Argus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ἄργος (Argos), derived from ἀργός (argos) meaning "glistening, shining". This name was borne by several characters from Greek myth, including the man who built the Argo and a giant with one hundred eyes.
Arjuna m Hinduism
Means "white, clear" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a hero in Hindu texts, the son of the god Indra and the princess Kunti.
Arwyn m Welsh
From the Welsh intensifying prefix ar- and gwyn meaning "white, fair".
Ashraqat f Arabic
Means "brightness" in Arabic.
Aynur f Turkish, Azerbaijani, Uyghur
Means "moon light" in Turkish, Azerbaijani and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning "moon" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Ayşenur f Turkish
Combination of Ayşe and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Azhar m Arabic, Urdu, Malay
Means "shining, bright" in Arabic.
Baer m Limburgish
Short form of Albaer and other Limburgish names ending in baer, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
Bai m & f Chinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
Baihu m Chinese Mythology
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure" and () meaning "tiger". This is the Chinese name of the White Tiger, associated with the west and the autumn season.
Bairrfhionn m Irish (Rare)
Means "fair hair", derived from Old Irish barr "top, head" and finn "white, fair".
Barak 1 m Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lightning" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament, Barak was a military commander under the guidance of the prophetess Deborah. They defeated the Canaanite army led by Sisera.
Bébinn f Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fair woman", from Old Irish "woman" and finn "fair, white". This name was borne by several characters in Irish mythology, including the mother of the hero Fráech.
Béla m Hungarian
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from Hungarian bél meaning "guts, bowel" or Slavic бѣлъ (belu) meaning "white". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.
Běla f Czech
Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning "white".
Belenus m Gaulish Mythology
Latinized form of Gaulish Belenos or Belinos, possibly from Celtic roots meaning either "bright, brilliant" (from Indo-European *bhel-) or "strong" (from Indo-European *bel-). This was the name of a Gaulish god who was often equated with Apollo. He is mostly known from Gallo-Roman inscriptions and was especially venerated in Aquileia in northern Italy.
Beorhtric m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "ruler".
Beorhtsige m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and sige "victory".
Bergljot f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Bergljót, which was composed of the elements berg "protection, help" and ljótr "light".
Berhane m & f Eastern African, Amharic
Means "my light" in Amharic.
Berhanu m Eastern African, Amharic
Means "his light" in Amharic.
Bert m English, German, Dutch
Short form of Albert and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
Bertha f German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
Berthild f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht "bright" and hild "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, an abbess of Chelles in France.
Berthold m German
Means "bright ruler" from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with wald "rule".
Bertie m & f English
Diminutive of Albert, Herbert and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
Bertilo m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous".
Berto m Italian, Spanish
Short form of Roberto, Alberto and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
Bertram m English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play All's Well That Ends Well (1603).
Bertrand m French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with Bertram and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
Berwyn m Welsh
Means "white top" from the Welsh elements barr "top, head" and gwyn "white, fair". This is the name of a mountain range in Wales.
Beyle f Yiddish (Rare)
From a Slavic word meaning "white".
Beyza f Turkish
Means "very white" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic بيضاء (bayda).
Bhaskara m Hinduism
Means "shining", derived from a combination of Sanskrit भास (bhasa) meaning "light" and कर (kara) meaning "maker". This is another name of the sun and the Hindu god Shiva. It was additionally borne by a 12th-century Indian astronomer, also known as Bhaskaracharya.
Birûsk m Kurdish
Means "lightning" in Kurdish.
Bjarte m Norwegian
From the Old Norse byname Bjartr, which meant "bright".
Blanchard m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements blanc meaning "white" and hard meaning "brave, hardy".
Blanche f French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
Blodwen f Welsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is the name of an 1878 Welsh opera by Joseph Parry.
Boann f Irish Mythology
Possibly from Old Irish "cow" and finn "white, fair". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of the River Boyne, which is named for her. She was the wife of Nechtan and the father of Aonghus (by Dagda).
Branwen f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Old Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". According to the Second Branch of the Mabinogi she was the daughter of Llŷr. After she was mistreated by her husband Matholwch, the king of Ireland, she managed to get a message to her brother Brân, the king of Britain. Brân launched a costly invasion to rescue her, but she died of grief shortly after her return.
Brecht m Dutch
Short form of names containing brecht, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
Bronwen f Welsh
Seemingly derived from Welsh bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed", though it has sometimes occurred as a variant spelling of the legendary name Branwen. It has been used as a given name in Wales since the 19th century. It is borne by a character in Richard Llewellyn's 1939 novel How Green Was My Valley, as well as the 1941 movie adaptation.
Burak m Turkish
From Arabic براق (Buraq), the name of the legendary creature that, according to Islamic tradition, transported the Prophet Muhammad. Its name is derived from Arabic برق (barq) meaning "lightning".
Byelobog m Slavic Mythology
Means "the white god" from Slavic byelo "white" and bogu "god". This was the name of the Slavic god of the sun, happiness and fortune.
Byeong-Ho m Korean
From Sino-Korean (byeong) meaning "bright, luminous, glorious" combined with (ho) meaning "great, numerous, vast" or (ho) meaning "summer, sky, heaven". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Caerwyn m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
Cahaya m & f Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Malay and Indonesian.
Candida f Late Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play Candida (1898).
Caoilfhionn f Irish
Derived from the Old Irish elements cáel "slender" and finn "fair, white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
Carwyn m Welsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "to love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This name was created in the 20th century.
Cassandra f English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσάνδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κέκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
Ceallach m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Cellach, of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish cellach "war, strife" or cell "church". This name was borne by several early Irish kings and by a 12th-century saint, an Archbishop of Armagh.
Céibhfhionn f Irish Mythology
Means "fair locks", from Old Irish ciab "locks, hair" and finn "fair, white". In Irish legend this was the name of one of the three daughters of Bec mac Buain.
Ceinwen f Welsh
Derived from Welsh cain "good, lovely" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint also known as Cain or Keyne.
Ceridwen f Welsh
Possibly from cyrrid "bent, crooked" (a derivative of Old Welsh cwrr "corner") combined with ben "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to the medieval Welsh legend the Tale of Taliesin (recorded by Elis Gruffyd in the 16th century) this was the name of a sorceress who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.... [more]
Charon m Greek Mythology
Possibly means "fierce brightness" in Greek. In Greek mythology Charon was the operator of the ferry that brought the newly dead over the River Acheron into Hades.
Clara f German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares.... [more]
Cledwyn m Welsh
Possibly derived from Welsh caled "rough, hard" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This is the name of a small river (Cledwen) in Conwy, Wales.
Colobert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements col, possibly meaning "helmet", and beraht meaning "bright".
Columbán m Old Irish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of Columba. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columbán of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
Cuthbert m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
Daiki m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "tree" or (ki) meaning "valuable". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
Delwyn m Welsh
From Welsh del "pretty" combined with gwyn "fair, white, blessed". It has been used as a given name since the start of the 20th century.
Dhaval m Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "dazzling white" in Sanskrit.
Dilwyn m Welsh
From Welsh dilys "genuine" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". It has been used since the late 19th century.
Dipa f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "light, lamp" in Sanskrit.
Dipti f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada
Means "brightness, light" in Sanskrit.
Diya 1 f Indian, Hindi
Means "lamp, light" in Hindi.
Doireann f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from the Old Irish prefix der "daughter" and finn "white, fair". Alternatively it may be derived from Irish doireann meaning "sullen, tempestuous". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a daughter of Bodb Derg who poisoned Fionn mac Cumhaill after he spurned her advances.
Drita f Albanian
From Albanian dritë meaning "light".
Eadberht m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
Ealdberht m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and beorht "bright".
Egbert m English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
Eilwen f Welsh
Perhaps means "white brow", derived from Welsh ael "brow" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is a recently created Welsh name.
Eirian f & m Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
Eirwen f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed". This name was created in the early 20th century.
Elior m Hebrew
Means "my God is my light" in Hebrew.
Elnur m Azerbaijani
Means "light of the people" in Azerbaijani, ultimately derived from Turkic el meaning "country, society" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Elouan m Breton, French
Possibly from a Breton word meaning "light". This name was borne by an obscure 6th-century saint who is now venerated mainly in Brittany and Cornwall.
Endrit m Albanian
From Albanian dritë meaning "light".
Engelbert m German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and beraht "bright". Saint Engelbert was a 13th-century archbishop of Cologne murdered by assassins.
Eurwen f Welsh
Derived from Welsh aur "gold" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
Filibert m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "much brightness" from the Germanic elements filu "much" and beraht "bright".
Finbar m Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Fionnbharr, Old Irish Finnbarr, derived from finn "white, fair" and barr "top, head". Saint Finbar of Cork was a 6th-century bishop who supposedly performed miraculous cures. The Isle of Barra off Scotland was (probably) named for him.
Fingal m Literature
Means "white stranger", derived from the Old Irish elements finn "white, fair" and gall "foreigner, stranger". This was the name of the hero in the Scottish author James Macpherson's 1761 poem Fingal, which he claimed to have based on early Gaelic legends about Fionn mac Cumhaill.
Finnian m Irish
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints, including the founders of monasteries at Clonard and Movilla (both 6th century).
Fintan m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white ancient" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
Fionn m Irish, Irish Mythology
From the Old Irish name Finn, derived from finn meaning "fair, white". It occurs frequently in Irish history and legends, the most noteworthy bearer being Fionn mac Cumhaill, the central character of one of the four main cycles of Irish mythology, the Fenian Cycle. Fionn was born as Deimne, and acquired his nickname because of his fair hair. He grew all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon, and later became the leader of the Fianna after defeating the fire-breathing demon Áillen. He was the father of Oisín and grandfather of Oscar.
Fionnlagh m Scottish Gaelic
Means "white warrior", derived from Old Irish finn "white, fair" and láech "warrior". An earlier form was Findláech — this was the name of the father of the 11th-century Scottish king Macbeth.
Fionnuala f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Old Irish finn "white, fair" and gúala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
Fulbert m French, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements fulc "people" and beraht "bright". Saint Fulbert was an 11th-century bishop of Chartres.
Fulgencio m Spanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Fulgentius, which meant "shining" from Latin fulgens. Saint Fulgentius was a 6th-century bishop from Tunisia who was a friend of Saint Augustine.
Gauri f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "white" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess, another name of Parvati the wife of Shiva, so named because of her fair complexion.
Gautbert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements gaut "Geat, Goth" and beraht "bright".
Gerel f Mongolian
Means "light" in Mongolian.
Gilbert m English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century English saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
Giltbert m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements gild "sacrifice, value" and beraht "bright".
Gisbert m German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of Gilbert), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
Glædwine m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
Godabert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements god "god" and beraht "bright".
Goizargi f Basque
Derived from Basque goiz "morning" and argi "light".
Guinevere f Arthurian Romance
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sēbros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.... [more]
Gülnur f Turkish
Means "rose light" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Gurdeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Gwen f Welsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of Gwendolen, Gwenllian and other names beginning with Gwen.
Gwenaël m French, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and hael meaning "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
Gwenda f Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 19th century.
Gwendal m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and tal meaning "brow, forehead".
Gwenddoleu m Welsh Mythology
From Old Welsh Guendoleu, possibly derived from gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dol (plural dolau) meaning "meadow". This was the name of a semi-legendary 6th-century king of Arfderydd in Cumbria. His defeat at the Battle of Arfderydd caused his bard Myrddin to go mad with grief.
Gwenddydd f Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dydd meaning "day". In medieval Welsh tales this is the name of Myrddin's sister. Geoffrey of Monmouth calls her Ganieda and also makes her the wife of Rhydderch Hael.
Gwendolen f Welsh
Possibly means "white ring", derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This name appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th-century chronicles, written in the Latin form Guendoloena, where it belongs to an ancient queen of the Britons who defeats her ex-husband in battle. Geoffrey later used it in Vita Merlini for the wife of the prophet Merlin. An alternate theory claims that the name arose from a misreading of the masculine name Guendoleu by Geoffrey.... [more]
Gwenfrewi f Welsh (Rare)
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with another element of uncertain meaning. It could possibly be Welsh ffreu meaning "stream, flow" or the obscure word ffrewi meaning "pacify, quell, reconcile". This may be the original form of Winifred. In any case, it is the Welsh name for the saint.
Gwenllian f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and possibly lliain meaning "flaxen, made of linen" or lliant meaning "flow, flood". This name was used by medieval Welsh royalty, notably by a 12th-century princess of Deheubarth who died in battle with the Normans. It was also borne by the 13th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last prince of Gwynedd.
Gwenneg m Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Gwenneg was an 8th-century monk of Brittany.
Gwyn m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Gwyn was a king of the Otherworld and the leader of the Wild Hunt. He appears in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen, where he is one of the many who help Culhwch hunt the monstrous boar Trwyth. The story also tells of his rivalry with Gwythyr for the beautiful Creiddylad.
Gwyneira f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow". This is a recently created Welsh name.
Gwynfor m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with maur meaning "great, large". This name was created in the 19th century.
Hadubert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu "battle" and beraht "bright".
Hardeep m Indian (Sikh)
From the name of the Hindu god Hari and Sanskrit दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Haru m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
Haruki m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Haruko f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
Haruto m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Haukea f Hawaiian
Means "white snow" from Hawaiian hau "snow" and kea "white".
Heddwyn m Welsh
Derived from Welsh hedd "peace" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This name has been given in honour of the poet Ellis Humphrey Evans (1887-1917), who used Hedd Wyn as his bardic name.
Heidrun f Norse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
Heimdall m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Heimdallr, derived from Old Norse heimr "home, house" and dallr "glowing, shining". In Norse mythology he is the god who guards the Bifröst, the bridge that connects Asgard to the other worlds. It is foretold that he will blow the Gjallarhorn to wake the gods for the final battle at the end of the world, Ragnarök. During this battle, he will fight Loki and they will slay one another.
Herbert m English, German, Dutch, Czech, Swedish, French
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
Heulwen f Welsh
Means "sunshine" in Welsh (a compound of haul "sun" and gwen "white, fair, blessed").
Hideaki m Japanese
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" and (aki) meaning "bright", as well as other combinations of kanji.
Hikari f & m Japanese
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
Hikaru m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.
Hildebert m German (Rare)
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
Hina f Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "light, sun, male" or (hi) meaning "sun, day" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hiranur f Turkish (Modern)
From Arabic حراء (Hira), the name of the cave where the Prophet Muhammad received his first revelation, combined with نور (nur) meaning "light".
Hiroki m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" and (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Ho'otseoo'e f Indigenous American, Cheyenne
Means "lightning woman" in Cheyenne.
Huang m & f Chinese
From Chinese (huáng) meaning "bright, shining, luminous" (which is usually only masculine) or (huáng) meaning "phoenix" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
Hubert m English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
Huệ f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (huệ) meaning "bright, intelligent" or (huệ) meaning "tuberose (flower)".
Hui f & m Chinese
From Chinese (huì) meaning "intelligent, wise" (which is usually only feminine), (huī) meaning "brightness", besides other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Humbert m French, German (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Huy m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (huy) meaning "brightness".
Hwan m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (hwan) meaning "shining, brilliant, lustrous" or other characters that are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character.
Hye m Korean
From Sino-Korean (hye) meaning "bright, intelligent" or other characters that are pronounced in the same way. Although it does appear rarely as a single-character name, it is more often used in combination with another character. A notable bearer was a 6th-century king of Baekje.
Hye-Jin f Korean
From Sino-Korean (hye) meaning "bright, intelligent" or (hye) meaning "favour, benefit" combined with (jin) meaning "precious, rare". This name can be formed by a variety of other hanja character combinations as well.
Ifa m Eastern African, Oromo
Means "light" in Oromo.
Ilargi f Basque
Means "moon" in Basque, a compound of hil "month" and argi "light".
İlknur f Turkish
Means "first light" in Turkish.
Illuminata f Late Roman
Means "illuminated, brightened, filled with light" in Latin. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint from Todi, Italy.
Indu f Indian, Hindi
Means "bright drop" in Sanskrit. This is a name for the moon.
Jamshid m Persian, Uzbek, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Yima Kshaeta, which meant "shining Jam". This was the name of a mythological king of Persia. He is known as either Jamshid or Jam, where Jamshid is a combination of his original name and an honourific.
Jatau m Western African, Hausa
Means "fair-coloured, light" in Hausa.
Jeong-Hui f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (jeong) meaning "right, proper, correct" or (jeong) meaning "quiet, still, gentle" combined with (hui) meaning "beauty" or (hui) meaning "bright, splendid, glorious". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
Ji-Ho m Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" and (ho) meaning "stove, bright" or (ho) meaning "summer, sky, heaven". This name can also be formed by other hanja character combinations.
Ji-Hye f Korean
From a Sino-Korean compound meaning "wisdom", formed of the hanja characters (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" and (hye) meaning "bright, intelligent". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
Jun-Ho m Korean
From Sino-Korean (jun) meaning "talented, handsome" combined with (ho) meaning "stove, bright" or (ho) meaning "summer, sky, heaven". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Jyoti f & m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit ज्योतिस् (jyotis) meaning "light". This is a transcription of both the feminine form ज्योती and the masculine form ज्योति.
Kashi f Indian, Hindi
From the name of a holy city in India, famous for its many temples dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Its name is derived from Sanskrit काशि (kashi) meaning "shining".
Kazuki m Japanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of kanji characters.
Keren f Hebrew
Means "horn" or "ray of light" in Hebrew.
Khurshid m & f Persian, Urdu, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Hvare Khshaeta meaning "shining sun". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata (or angel) who was associated with the sun.
Kidlat m Filipino, Tagalog
Means "lightning" in Tagalog.
Kohinoor f Various
From Koh-i-noor, the name of a famous gemstone, meaning "mountain of light" in Persian.
Kōki m Japanese
From Japanese () meaning "light" or () meaning "happiness, good luck" combined with (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "brightness". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji characters as well.
Kōnane m & f Hawaiian
Means "bright" in Hawaiian.
Krešimir m Croatian
From the Slavic elements kresu "spark, light, rouse" and miru "peace, world". This was the name of four kings of Croatia.
Kuldeep m Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit कुल (kula) meaning "family" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Kunibert m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuni "clan, family" and beraht "bright".
Laban m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew לָבָן (lavan) meaning "white". In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Rachel and Leah.
Lambert m German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements landa "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
Lamia 1 f Arabic
Means "shining, radiant" in Arabic.
Lasha m Georgian
Possibly from a Northwest Caucasian word meaning "light". This was a name of Giorgi IV, a 13th-century king of Georgia.
Lebanah m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "white" in Hebrew, a poetic name for the moon. This name appears briefly in the Old Testament.
Lesedi f Southern African, Tswana
Means "light" in Tswana.
Leukippos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "white horse", derived from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "white, bright" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This name was borne by a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, as well as by several characters in Greek mythology.
Lior m & f Hebrew
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
Livna f Hebrew
Means "white" in Hebrew.
Lubbert m Frisian
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and beraht "bright".
Lucasta f Literature
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called Lucasta (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, whom he called lux casta "pure light".
Luce f Italian, French
Italian and French variant of Lucia. This also means "light" in Italian.
Lucero f & m Spanish (Mexican), Spanish (Latin American)
Means "light source, bright star, morning star" in Spanish, a derivative of luz "light". Occasionally it is used as a diminutive of the name Luz. It is most common in Mexico and Colombia.
Lucifer m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". In Latin this name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven (see Isaiah 14:12). In later literature, such as the Divine Comedy (1321) by Dante and Paradise Lost (1667) by John Milton, Lucifer became associated with Satan himself.
Lucina f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.
Lucius m Ancient Roman, Biblical, English
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was derived from Latin lux "light". This was the most popular of the praenomina. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca (known simply as Seneca), a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian. The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch. It was also borne by three popes, including the 3rd-century Saint Lucius. Despite this, the name was not regularly used in the Christian world until after the Renaissance.
Lugus m Gaulish Mythology (Hypothetical)
Possibly from one of the Indo-European roots *lewk- "light, brightness", *lewg- "dark" or *lewgh- "oath". This was the name of a Celtic (Gaulish) god of commerce and craftsmanship, who was equated by the Romans with Mercury. He probably forms the basis for the characters and names of Lugh (Irish) and Lleu (Welsh).
Luminița f Romanian
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Lux f & m Various
Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".
Luz f Spanish
Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".
Mairwen f Welsh
Combination of Mair and Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
Malo m Breton
Means "bright pledge", derived from Old Breton mach "pledge, hostage" and lou "bright, brilliant". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint, supposedly a companion of Saint Brendan on his trans-Atlantic journey. He later went to Brittany, where he founded the monastic settlement of Saint-Malo.
Mandeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit मनस् (manas) meaning "mind, intellect, spirit" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Maor m Hebrew
Means "a light" in Hebrew.
Meinwen f Welsh
Means "slender and beautiful maiden" from a Welsh compound of main "slender" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
Meir m Hebrew
Means "giving light" in Hebrew.
Melchior m Dutch (Rare), Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Possibly from the Hebrew roots מֶלֶכְ (melekh) meaning "king" and אוֹר ('or) meaning "light". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. According to medieval tradition he was a king of Persia.
Ming m & f Chinese
From Chinese (míng) meaning "bright, light, clear" or (míng) meaning "inscribe, engrave", as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Minh m & f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (minh) meaning "bright". This was an adopted name of the communist revolutionary Hồ Chí Minh (1890-1969).
Mitsuaki m Japanese
From Japanese (mitsu) meaning "light" and (aki) meaning "bright, luminous". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Mitsuko f Japanese
From Japanese (mitsu) meaning "light" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Muirenn f Old Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish muir "sea" and finn "fair, white". This is another name of Muirne, the mother of the legendary hero Fionn mac Cumhaill.
Muirgel f Old Irish
Means "bright sea", derived from Old Irish muir "sea" and gel "bright".
Munir m Arabic
Means "bright, shining" in Arabic.
Myeong m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (myeong) meaning "bright, light, clear" or other hanja characters with the same pronunciation. Although it does appear rarely as a single-character name, it is more often used in combination with another character.
Myeong-Suk f Korean
From Sino-Korean (myeong) meaning "bright, light, clear" combined with (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming". Other hanja combinations are possible.
Narangerel f Mongolian
Means "sun light" in Mongolian.
Natela f Georgian
Derived from Georgian ნათელი (nateli) meaning "light, bright".
Navdeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit नव (nava) meaning "new, fresh" and दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Neriah m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lamp of Yahweh" in Hebrew, from נֵר (ner) meaning "lamp, light" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of the father of Baruch in the Old Testament.
Niamh f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god Manannán mac Lir in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, the son of Fionn mac Cumhaill. It has been used as a given name for people only since the early 20th century.
Nisanur f Turkish
From the name Nisa combined with Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Nogah m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "brightness" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of King David in the Old Testament.
Noor-Ali m Persian
From Persian نور (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) combined with the name Ali 1. Though usually transcribed into Latin characters with a dash or a space, it is not written with a space in Persian.
Norbert m German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord meaning "north" and beraht meaning "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
Noriaki m Japanese
From Japanese (nori) meaning "law" or (nori) meaning "rule, ceremony" combined with (aki) meaning "bright, light, clear". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
Nur f & m Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
Nur ad-Din m Arabic
Means "light of religion", from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" combined with دين (din) meaning "religion, faith".
Nurasyl m Kazakh (Rare)
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) and асыл (asyl) meaning "precious, noble".
Nuray f Turkish
Means "bright moon" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Turkic ay meaning "moon".
Nurbek m Kyrgyz
From Kyrgyz нур (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) combined with the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
Nurcan f Turkish
Means "bright soul" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Persian jan meaning "soul, life".
Nurgül f Turkish
Means "radiant rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose".
Nuri m Arabic, Turkish
Means "my light" in Arabic.
Nurislam m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) combined with Islam, the name of the religion (ultimately from Arabic إسلام).
Nurlan m Kazakh, Kyrgyz
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) combined with ұлан (ulan) meaning "young man, soldier". The corresponding Kyrgyz roots are нур and улан.
Nurmuhamad m Avar
Combination of Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and the name Muhamad.
Nursultan m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" and сұлтан (sultan) meaning "sultan, king" (both words of Arabic origin).
Nurten f Turkish
Means "radiant skin" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Persian تن (tan) meaning "body".
Nuru f Eastern African, Swahili
Means "light" in Swahili, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur).
Nurul m & f Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with نور ال (Nur al) meaning "light of the" (such as نور الدين (Nur al-Din) meaning "light of religion").
Nurullah m Arabic, Turkish
Means "light of Allah", from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" combined with الله (Allah).
Nurzhan m Kazakh
From Kazakh нұр (nur) meaning "light" (of Arabic origin) and жан (zhan) meaning "soul" (of Persian origin).
Ọbatala m African Mythology
Means "king of white cloth" in Yoruba, derived from ọba "king" and àlà "white cloth". According to traditional Yoruba religion he is the creator of the earth and human beings. He also founded the first Yoruba city, Ife.
Odeserundiye m Indigenous American, Mohawk
Possibly means "lightning has struck" in Mohawk. This was the name of an 18th-century Mohawk chief, also called John Deseronto.
Olwen f Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen she was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry.
Or m & f Hebrew
Means "light" in Hebrew.
Orel m Hebrew
Means "light of God" in Hebrew.
Ori m & f Hebrew
Means "my light" in Hebrew.
Orion m Greek Mythology
Meaning uncertain, but possibly related to Greek ὅριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
Orit f Hebrew
Means "light" in Hebrew.
Orli f Hebrew
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
Osbert m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman Conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Oyibo m & f Western African, Urhobo
Means "white" in Urhobo.
Phaedra f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φαίδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρός (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.
Phaedrus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φαῖδρος (Phaidros), which meant "bright". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, and also of a 1st-century Roman fabulist who was originally a slave from Thrace.
Phaenna f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φαεινός (phaeinos) meaning "shining". According to some Greek myths this was the name of one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites).
Phoebe f English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοίβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοῖβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae.... [more]
Phoebus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοῖβος (Phoibos), which meant "bright, pure". This was an epithet of the Greek god Apollo.
Photine f Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φῶς (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτός (photos)). This is the name traditionally given to the Samaritan woman Jesus met at the well (see John 4:7). She is venerated as a saint by the Eastern Church.
Photios m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φῶς (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτός (photos)).
Prabhakara m Hinduism
Means "light maker", derived from Sanskrit प्रभा (prabha) meaning "light" and कर (kara) meaning "maker". This is a name given to the sun in Hindu texts. It was also borne by a medieval Hindu scholar.
Prabhat m Indian, Hindi
Means "shining forth, morning" in Sanskrit.
Pradip m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit प्रदीप (pradipa) meaning "light, lantern".
Prakash m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Gujarati, Bengali, Odia, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit प्रकाश (prakasha) meaning "light, bright, shining".
Prasad m Indian, Telugu, Marathi, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Odia, Bengali, Nepali
Means "brightness, clearness, graciousness, offering" in Sanskrit. This is a word referring to an offering of food made to a deity.
Prasanna m Tamil, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Odia, Hindi
Means "clear, bright, tranquil" in Sanskrit.
Pratibha f Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "light, splendour, intelligence" in Sanskrit.
Quang m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (quang) meaning "bright, clear".
Ragnheiðr f Old Norse
Old Norse name meaning "bright advice", derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and heiðr "brightness".
Raiden m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (den) meaning "lightning". This is a regional epithet of the Japanese god Raijin.
Rambert m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hramn "raven" and beraht "bright".
Ramprasad m Bengali, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "clearness of Rama" from the name of the Hindu deity Rama 1 combined with Sanskrit प्रसाद (prasada) meaning "clearness, brightness". This name was borne by the 18th-century Bengali poet Ramprasad Sen.
Ray m English
Short form of Raymond, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
Riko f Japanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "reason, logic" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.