Names Categorized "canines"

This is a list of names in which the categories include canines.
gender
usage
Adalwolf m Germanic
Old German form of Adolf.
Adhara f Astronomy
Derived from Arabic عذارى ('adhara) meaning "maidens". This is the name of the second brightest star (after Sirius) in the constellation Canis Major.
Adolf m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Germanic
From the Old German name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the elements adal "noble" and wolf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
Adolphus m Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Adolf.
Æðelwulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðele "noble" and wulf "wolf" (making it a cognate of Adolf). This name was borne by a 9th-century king of Wessex.
Agilulf m Germanic
Old German name derived from the elements agil meaning "edge, blade" and wolf meaning "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century saint (a bishop of Cologne).
Amaruq m Indigenous American, Inuit
Means "wolf" in Inuktitut.
Anubis m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ἄνουβις (Anoubis), the Greek form of Egyptian jnpw (reconstructed as Anapa and other forms), which coincided with a word meaning "royal child, prince". However, it might alternatively be derived from the root jnp meaning "to decay". Anubis was the Egyptian god who led the dead to the underworld. He was often depicted as a man with the head of a jackal. The Greeks equated him with their god Hermes.
Arnolfo m Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Arnulf.
Arnulf m German, Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and wolf meaning "wolf". This name was borne by a few early saints, notably a 7th-century Frankish bishop of Metz. It was also the name of a 9th-century Holy Roman emperor.
Asena f Turkish
Possibly of Scythian origin meaning "blue". In Turkic mythology Asena was a grey wolf who gave birth to the ancestor of the Ashina tribe of Turks.
Athaulf m Gothic (Modernized)
Contemporary spelling of the Gothic name *Aþawulfs, derived from the elements aþals "nobility" and wulfs "wolf" (making it a cognate of Adolf). Alternatively, the first element could be atta "father". This was the name of a 5th-century king of the Visigoths.
Badulf m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements batu meaning "battle" and wolf meaning "wolf".
Banquo m Literature
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from Scottish Gaelic bàn "white" and "dog, hound". This is the name of a character in William Shakespeare's semi-historical tragedy Macbeth (1606). He earlier appears in Holinshed's Chronicles (1587), one of Shakespeare's sources for the play.
Bardulf m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements barta "axe" and wolf "wolf".
Baugulf m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements boug meaning "ring, bracelet" and wolf meaning "wolf".
Beowulf m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
Bleddyn m Welsh
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Gwynedd and Powys.
Boris m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German, French
From a Bulgar Turkic name, also recorded as Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his realm to Christianity and is thus regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church. To the north in Kievan Rus it was the name of another saint, a son of Vladimir the Great who was murdered with his brother Gleb in the 11th century. His mother may have been Bulgarian.... [more]
Botwulf m Anglo-Saxon
From Old English bot meaning "improvement" and wulf meaning "wolf". Saint Botwulf was a 7th-century English abbot. He may be the person after whom Boston is named.
Cailean m Scottish Gaelic
Means "whelp, young dog" in Scottish Gaelic. This name was borne by Cailean Mór, a 13th-century Scottish lord and ancestor of Clan Campbell.
Caleb m English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.... [more]
Catello m Italian
Italian form of Catellus.
Catellus m Late Roman
Probably from Latin catulus meaning "young dog, puppy". Saint Catellus was a 9th-century bishop of Castellammare, Italy.
Cerberus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κέρβερος (Kerberos), which possibly meant "spotted". In Greek myth this was the name of the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades.
Chaleb m Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Caleb used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
Chlodulf m Germanic
Old German form of Ludolf.
Coileán m Medieval Irish
Irish byname meaning "whelp, young dog".
Conall m Irish, Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "rule of a wolf", from Old Irish "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and fal "rule". This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
Conán m Irish, Old Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Conan.
Conan m Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Irish "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of the Isle of Man. It appears in Irish legend as a companion Fionn mac Cumhaill. A famous bearer of it as a middle name was Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. It is also the name of the hero of the Conan the Barbarian series of books, comics and movies, debuting 1932.
Conchobar m Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Old Irish "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish rulers. It was borne by the Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, one of the central characters in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre and his war with Queen Medb of Connacht.
Connell m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Conaill, a derivative of the given name Conall.
Connla m Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Conláech, derived from "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and láech "warrior". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including the son of Cúchulainn and Aoife. When he finally met his father they fought because Connla would not identify himself, and the son was slain.
Conor m Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Conchobar (or the Modern Irish form Conchúr).
Conrí m Old Irish
Means "king of hounds" in Irish.
Cruella f Popular Culture
From the English word cruel, ultimately from Latin crudelis "hard, severe, cruel". This is the name of the antagonist, Cruella de Vil, in the 1961 Disney movie 101 Dalmatians, based on a 1956 novel by Dodie Smith.
Cúán m Old Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Old Irish meaning "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 8th-century saint.
Cúchulainn m Irish Mythology
Means "hound of Culann" in Irish. This was the usual name of the warrior hero who was named Sétanta at birth, given to him because he took the place of one of Culann's hounds after he accidentally killed it. The Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology tells of Cúchulainn's many adventures, including his single-handed defence of Ulster against the army of Queen Medb.
Cunobelinus m Brythonic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Brythonic name, possibly from old Celtic * "dog, hound" (genitive *kunos) combined with either the name of the god Belenus or another Celtic root meaning "strong". This was the name of a 1st-century king of southeast Britain. He is known from Roman historians such as Suetonius and medieval Welsh histories, as well as from coins bearing his name.
Cymbeline m Literature
Form of Cunobelinus used by Shakespeare in his play Cymbeline (1609).
Eadwulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman Conquest.
Eardwulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
Fáelán m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Faolán.
Faolán m Irish (Rare)
Means "little wolf", derived from Old Irish fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.
Fastúlfr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements fastr "firm, solid" and ulfr "wolf".
Fenrir m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse fen meaning "marsh, fen". In Norse mythology Fenrir was a ferocious wolf, one of the offspring of Loki and the giantess Angrboða. Because it was foretold he would bring about disaster, the gods bound him with a magical fetter, though in the process Tyr's hand was bitten off. At the time of Ragnarök, the end of the world, it is told that he will break free and kill Odin.
Fillin m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Fox m English (Modern)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
Gela m Georgian
Possibly from Georgian მგელი (mgeli) meaning "wolf".
Gerlof m Dutch
Dutch form of Gerulf.
Gerolf m German (Rare)
German form of Gerulf.
Gerulf m Germanic
Derived from Old German ger meaning "spear" and wolf meaning "wolf". This was the name of an 8th-century saint and martyr from Drongen, Belgium.
Guadalupe f & m Spanish
From a Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, meaning "Our Lady of Guadalupe". Guadalupe is a Spanish place name, the site of a famous convent, derived from Arabic وادي (wadi) meaning "valley, river" possibly combined with Latin lupus meaning "wolf". In the 16th century Our Lady of Guadalupe supposedly appeared in a vision to a native Mexican man, and she is now regarded as a patron saint of the Americas.
Gurgen m Armenian, Georgian
Derived from Middle Persian 𐭢𐭥𐭫𐭢 (gurg) meaning "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several Georgian kings and princes.
Hrodulf m Germanic
Old German form of Rudolf.
Hrolf m Germanic
Contracted form of Hrodulf.
Hrólfr m Old Norse
Contracted form of Hróðulfr.
Hroðulf m Anglo-Saxon
From Old English hroð "fame, glory" and wulf "wolf", making it a cognate of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). This name appears in Beowulf belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
Hróðulfr m Old Norse
From Old Norse hróðr "praise, fame" and ulfr "wolf", making it an Old Norse cognate of Hrodulf (see Rudolf).
Inari f & m Japanese Mythology
Means "carrying rice" in Japanese, from (ina) meaning "rice" and (ri) meaning "carry". This is the name of a Japanese divinity associated with prosperity, rice and foxes, represented as both female and male.
Ingolf m Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god Ing combined with ulfr meaning "wolf".
Ingólfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingolf.
Ingulf m Germanic
Old German cognate of Ingólfr.
Inola f Indigenous American, Cherokee
Derived from Cherokee ᎢᏃᎵ (inoli) meaning "black fox".
Ivailo m Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Bulgarian Ивайло (see Ivaylo).
Ivayla f Bulgarian
Feminine form of Ivaylo.
Ivaylo m Bulgarian
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
Jezebel f Biblical
From Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel), probably from a Phoenician name, possibly containing the Semitic root zbl meaning "to exalt, to dwell". According to one theory it might be an altered form of the Phoenician name 𐤁𐤏𐤋𐤀𐤆𐤁𐤋 (Baʿlʾizbel) meaning "Ba'al exalts" with the first element removed or replaced.... [more]
Kaleb m English (Modern)
English variant of Caleb.
Kalev 2 m Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Caleb.
Landulf m Germanic
Old German name derived from the elements lant meaning "land" and wolf meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several Lombard nobles.
Lassie f Literature
From a diminutive of the northern English word lass meaning "young girl", a word probably of Norse origin. This name was used by the author Eric Knight for a collie dog in his novel Lassie Come-Home (1940), later adapted into a popular film and television series.
Lope m Spanish
Spanish form of Lupus (see Loup).
Lopo m Portuguese (Rare)
Portuguese form of Lupus (see Loup).
Loup m French
French form of the Roman name Lupus meaning "wolf". Lupus was the name of several early saints, including a 5th-century bishop of Troyes who apparently convinced Attila to spare the city.
Lowell m English
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix. The surname was borne by American poet and satirist James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).
Ludolf m German (Rare), Germanic
From the Old German name Hludolf, which was composed of the elements hlut meaning "famous, loud" and wolf meaning "wolf". Saint Ludolf (or Ludolph) was a 13th-century bishop of Ratzeburg.
Lupe f & m Spanish
Short form of Guadalupe.
Lupita f Spanish
Diminutive of Guadalupe.
Lupus m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Loup.
Lyall m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Liulfr (which was derived in part from úlfr "wolf").
Lycurgus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυκοῦργος (Lykourgos), derived from λύκος (lykos) meaning "wolf" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work, deed". In Greek legend this was the name of a king who was driven mad by the gods because of his impiety. This was also the name of a Spartan legislator of the 9th century BC.
Lycus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
Maelgwn m Medieval Welsh
From Old Welsh Mailcun, from a Brythonic name *Maglocunos meaning "chief of hounds", derived from Celtic *maglos "chief" and * "dog, hound" (genitive *kunos). This was the name of several early Welsh rulers, notably Maelgwn Gwynedd, a 6th-century king of Gwynedd.
Phelan m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Pluto m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek Πλούτων (Plouton), derived from πλοῦτος (ploutos) meaning "wealth". This was an alternate name of Hades, the god of the underworld. This is also the name of a dwarf planet (formerly designated the ninth planet) in the solar system.
Radulf m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements rat meaning "counsel, advice" and wolf meaning "wolf", making it a cognate of Ráðúlfr.
Rafe m English
Variant of Ralph. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
Raginolf m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements regin "advice, counsel, decision" and wolf "wolf".
Ralph m English, German, Swedish
Contracted form of the Old Norse name Ráðúlfr (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman Conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was variously spelled Rauf, Rafe or Ralf reflecting the usual pronunciation. The Ralph spelling became more common in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
Ralphie m English
Diminutive of Ralph.
Randolf m English
From the Old German elements rant meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wolf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
Randolph m English
Variant of Randolf. This spelling was adopted in the 18th century.
Randulf m Germanic
Old German form of Randolf.
Randúlfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Randolf.
Ranulf m Medieval English
Medieval English form of Raginolf. Norman settlers and invaders introduced this name to England and Scotland.
Raoul m French, Italian
French form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Ráðúlfr m Old Norse
Derived from the Norse elements ráð meaning "counsel, advice" and ulfr meaning "wolf".
Raúl m Spanish
Spanish form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Raül m Catalan
Catalan form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Raul m Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Estonian
Portuguese, Italian, Romanian and Estonian form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Renard m French (Rare)
French form of Reynard. Because of the medieval character Reynard the Fox, renard became a French word meaning "fox".
Reynard m English (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel, decision" and hart "hard, firm, brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England in the form Reinard, though it never became very common there. In medieval fables the name was borne by the sly hero Reynard the Fox (with the result that renard has become a French word meaning "fox").
Rodolfito m Spanish (Rare)
Spanish diminutive of Rodolfo.
Rodolfo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Rudolf. This is the name of the hero in Puccini's opera La Bohème (1896).
Rodolphe m French
French form of Rudolf.
Roelof m Dutch
Dutch form of Rudolf.
Roffe m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of Rolf.
Rolf m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Old German name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
Rollo m English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of Rolf. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
Roul m Medieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of Rolf.
Rover m & f Pet
From an English word, the agent noun of the verb rove meaning "roam, wander". This a stereotypical name for a dog.
Rudolf m German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Dutch, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hruod meaning "fame" and wolf meaning "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy and a king of West Francia, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel The Prisoner of Zenda (1894).
Rūdolfs m Latvian
Latvian form of Rudolf.
Rudolph m English
English form of Rudolf, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
Sandalio m Spanish
Spanish form of Sandalius, possibly a Latinized form of a Gothic name composed of the elements swinþs "strong" and wulfs "wolf". It also nearly coincides with Latin sandalium "sandal". This was the name of a 9th-century Spanish saint martyred by the Moors.
Shaw m English (Rare)
From a surname. As an English surname it is derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket". As a Scottish surname it is derived from the Gaelic byname Sitheach meaning "wolf".
Sítheach m Medieval Irish
Means "peaceful" or "fairy-like" in Irish, from Old Irish síd. Alternatively, it could be from sídach "wolf".
Stithulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements stiþ "hard, stiff" and wulf "wolf".
Susi f German
German diminutive of Susanne.
Tahmuras m Persian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan 𐬙𐬀𐬑𐬨𐬀⸱𐬎𐬭𐬎𐬞𐬌 (Taxma Urupi), derived from 𐬙𐬀𐬑𐬨𐬀 (taxma) meaning "strong" and 𐬎𐬭𐬎𐬞𐬌 (urupi) meaning "fox". Taxma Urupi is a hero mentioned in the Avesta who later appears in the 10th-century Persian epic the Shahnameh.
Talbot m English (Rare)
From an English surname, of Norman origin, possibly derived from an unattested Germanic given name composed of the elements dala "to destroy" and bod "message".
Tangi m Breton
Breton form of Tanguy.
Tanguy m Breton, French
From Breton tan "fire" and gi "dog". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton saint.
Toby m & f English
Medieval form of Tobias. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
Todd m English
From an English surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde. As a given name it was rare before 1930. It peaked in popularity in most parts of the English-speaking world in the 1960s or 70s, but it has since declined.
Tyr m Norse Mythology
From Týr, the Old Norse form of the name of the Germanic god *Tīwaz, related to Indo-European *Dyēws (see Zeus). In Norse mythology he was a god associated with war and justice, by some accounts a son of Odin. While the gods bound the great wolf Fenrir, Tyr placated the beast by placing his right hand in its mouth. After the binding was successful, Fenrir bit off Tyr's hand. At the time of the end of the world, Ragnarök, it is foretold that Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
Uffe m Danish
Variant of Ulf.
Ulf m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse byname Úlfr meaning "wolf".
Ulfilas m Gothic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Wulfila.
Úlfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ulf.
Úlfur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Ulf.
Ulric m English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric. When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of Ulrich.
Ulrica f Swedish
Feminine form of Ulric.
Vakhtang m Georgian
Possibly from Old Persian 𐎺𐎼𐎣 𐎫𐎵𐎢 (varka tanu) meaning "wolf-bodied". This name was borne by several kings of Georgia.
Valko m Bulgarian
Derived from Bulgarian вълк (valk) meaning "wolf".
Varg m Norwegian (Rare), Swedish (Rare)
Means "wolf" in Old Norse.
Velvel m Yiddish (Rare)
Means "little wolf" in Yiddish, a diminutive of װאָלףֿ (volf) meaning "wolf". This is a vernacular form of Zeev.
Velvela f Yiddish (Rare)
Feminine form of Velvel.
Vuk m Serbian
Means "wolf" in Serbian.
Vukašin m Serbian
Derived from Serbian vuk meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian ruler.
Wolf m German, Jewish, English (Rare), Germanic
Short form of Wolfgang, Wolfram and other names containing the Old German element wolf meaning "wolf" (Proto-Germanic *wulfaz). It can also be simply from the German or English word.
Wolfe m English (Rare)
Variant of Wolf, influenced by the spelling of the surname (which is also derived from the animal).
Wolfgang m German, Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements wolf meaning "wolf" and gang meaning "path, way". Saint Wolfgang was a 10th-century bishop of Regensburg. Two other famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
Wolfhard m German
Derived from the Old German element wolf meaning "wolf" combined with hart meaning "hard, firm, brave, hardy".
Wolfram m German
Derived from the Old German element wolf meaning "wolf" combined with hram meaning "raven". Saint Wolfram (or Wulfram) was a 7th-century archbishop of Sens. This name was also borne by the 13th-century German poet Wolfram von Eschenbach, the author of Parzival.
Wulf m German
Variant of Wolf.
Wulfflæd f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and flæd, possibly meaning "beauty".
Wulfgang m Germanic
Old German form of Wolfgang.
Wulfgifu f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and giefu "gift".
Wulfhram m Germanic
Old German form of Wolfram.
Wulfila m Gothic (Hypothetical)
Means "little wolf", from a diminutive of the Gothic element wulfs. This was the name of a 4th-century Gothic bishop and missionary. He translated the New Testament into Gothic.
Wulfnoð m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and noð "boldness, daring". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest.
Wulfram m Germanic
Old German form of Wolfram.
Wulfric m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name meaning "wolf ruler", from the elements wulf "wolf" and ric "ruler, king".
Wulfrun f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and run "secret lore, rune". This was the name of a 10th-century English noblewoman who founded the city of Wolverhampton.
Wulfruna f History
Form of Wulfrun sometimes used in reference to the 10th-century noblewoman.
Wulfsige m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
Wulfstan m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and stan "stone".
Wulfwynn f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and wynn "joy".
Ylfa f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Ylva.
Ylva f Swedish, Norwegian
Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".
Zeev m Hebrew
Means "wolf" in Hebrew.
Zev m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew זְאֵב (see Zeev).