Names Categorized "landforms"

This is a list of names in which the categories include landforms.
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AILSAfScottish
From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.
ARLOmEnglish
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
BEAUMONTmEnglish (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain".
BESSARIONmLate Greek
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Greek βησσα (bessa) "wooded valley". This was the name of a 5th-century Egyptian hermit who was a disciple of Saint Anthony the Great. It was later adopted by the scholar Basilios Bessarion (1403-1472), a Greek born in Byzantine Anatolia who became a Roman Catholic bishop.
BLAIRm & fScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BRANDONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of BRENDAN.
BRENTmEnglish
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BRIANmEnglish, Irish, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
BRYNm & fWelsh, English
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
CAMDENmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CAVANmEnglish
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname CAVAN.
CLIFFmEnglish
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CRAIGmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks", originally indicating a person who lived near a crag.
DALEm & fEnglish
From an English surname which originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
DALTONmEnglish
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.
DELLm & fEnglish
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who lived in a dell or valley.
DELTAfEnglish
From the name of the fourth letter in the Greek alphabet, Δ. It is also the name for an island formed at the mouth of a river.
DENHOLMmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "valley island" in Old English.
DENTONmEnglish
From a surname, originally from a place name, which meant "valley town" in Old English.
ELSDONmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Elli's valley" in Old English.
EMLYNmWelsh
Probably from the name of an ancient region in Wales, its name meaning "around the valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EVERLYfEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English eofor "boar" and leah "woodland, clearing".
EYDÍSfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
EYSTEINNmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and steinn meaning "stone".
GADARfArmenian
Variant transcription of KATAR.
GLENNmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
GLYNmWelsh
Means "valley" in Welsh.
GLYNDWRmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley water". This name is often given in honour of Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century Welsh patriot who led a revolt against England.
GLYNISfWelsh
Either a variant of GLENYS or an elaboration of the Welsh word glyn meaning "valley".
GORANmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian (Rare)
Means "mountain man", derived from South Slavic gora "mountain". It was popularized by the Croatian poet Ivan Goran Kovačić (1913-1943), who got his middle name because of the mountain town where he was born.
HARANmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "hill, mountain" in Hebrew. This is the name of the brother of Abraham and father of Lot in the Old Testament.
HARLOWf & mEnglish
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HAYDENm & fEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HOLDENmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel 'The Catcher in the Rye' (1951), Holden Caufield.
HOLGERmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hólmgeirr, derived from the elements holmr "island" and geirr "spear". This was the name of one of Charlemagne's generals, a nobleman from Denmark.
IONA (1)fEnglish, Scottish
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
ITHAMARmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אִיתָמָר ('Itamar) meaning "date palm island". This is the name of a son of Aaron in the Old Testament.
KATARfArmenian
Means "summit, crest" in Armenian.
KELSEYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KENDALLm & fEnglish
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KYLEmEnglish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
LANDONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).
LELANDmEnglish
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).
LINDSAYf & mEnglish, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English. As a given name it was typically masculine until the 1960s (in Britain) and 1970s (in America) when it became popular for girls, probably due to its similarity to Linda and because of American actress Lindsay Wagner (1949-).
LORELEIfGermanic Mythology
From a Germanic name meaning "luring rock". This is the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. Legends say that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures fishermen to their death with her song.
LYLEmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French l'isle "island".
MARWAfArabic
From the Arabic name of a fragrant plant. Al-Marwa is one of the names of a sacred hill near Mecca.
MONTGOMERYmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
MONTSERRATfCatalan
From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".
MUIRmScottish
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "moor, fen". It also means "sea" in Scottish Gaelic.
NINHURSAGfSumerian Mythology
Means "lady of the mountain", from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and 𒉺𒂅 (hursaĝ) meaning "mountain". This was the name of the Sumerian mother and fertility goddess, the primary consort of Enki.
ODELLm & fEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "woad hill" in Old English. A woad is a herb used for dyeing.
OGDENmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "oak valley" in Old English. A famous bearer was the humourous American poet Ogden Nash (1902-1971).
ORESTESmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ορεστιας (orestias) meaning "of the mountains". In Greek myth he was the son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. He killed his mother and her lover Aegisthus after they killed his father.
ØYVINDmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Eyvindr, which was derived from ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and vindr possibly meaning "victor".
PERCIVALmArthurian Romance, English
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem 'Perceval, the Story of the Grail'. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".
RAMSEYmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "wild-garlic island" in Old English.
RHONAfScottish
Possibly derived from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island" in Gaelic.
RHONDAfEnglish
Probably intended to mean "good spear" from Welsh rhon "spear" and da "good", but possibly influenced by the name of the Rhondda Valley in South Wales, which means "noisy". It has been in use only since the 20th century. Its use may have been partially inspired by Margaret Mackworth, Viscountess Rhondda (1883-1956), a British feminist.
RIGBYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "ridge farm" in Old Norse.
RIVERm & fEnglish (Modern)
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
RODNEYmEnglish
From a surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame"). It was first used as a given name in honour of the British admiral Lord Rodney (1719-1792).
SHELDONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley with steep sides" in Old English. Sheldon is the name of several locations in England.
SKYEfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SLADEmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which meant "valley" in Old English.
TRINIDADf & mSpanish
Means "trinity" in Spanish, referring to the Holy Trinity. An island in the West Indies bears this name.
URALmBashkir, Turkish
From the name of the Ural Mountains, of uncertain meaning, possibly from Turkic aral meaning "island, boundary". This is the name of the title character in the Bashkir epic 'Ural-batyr'.
VALEfEnglish
From the English word meaning "wide river valley".
WARDELLmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "watch hill" in Old English.
WELDONmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill near a spring" in Old English.
WHITNEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
YALEmWelsh
From a Welsh surname which was itself derived from a place name meaning "fertile upland" (from Welsh ial).
YAMATOmJapanese
From YAMATO, an ancient name for Japan. It can also refer to the Yamato period in Japanese history, which lasted into the 8th century. The individual kanji are meaning "great" and meaning "harmony".
YAN (2)f & mChinese
From Chinese (yàn) meaning "beautiful, gorgeous" (which is usually only feminine) or (yán) meaning "cliff, rocks", as well as other Chinese characters pronounced in a similar fashion.