Names Categorized "anglicizations"

This is a list of names in which the categories include anglicizations.
gender
usage
Africa 2 f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Aifric.
Aidan m Irish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Aodhán. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it shares a sound with such names as Braden and Hayden. It peaked ranked 39th for boys in 2003.
Aideen f Irish
Anglicized form of Éadaoin.
Ailish f Irish
Anglicized form of Ailís.
Aladdin m Literature
Anglicized form of Ala ad-Din. This is the name of a mischievous boy in one of the tales of The 1001 Nights. A magician traps him in a cave, but he escapes with the help of a genie.
Alastair m Scottish
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alby m Irish
Anglicized masculine form of Ailbhe.
Alistair m Scottish
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alister m Scottish
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alpin m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic name Ailpean, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
Angus m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of Aonghus.
Ardal m Irish
Anglicized form of Ardghal.
Aristotle m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Ἀριστοτέλης (Aristoteles) meaning "the best purpose", derived from ἄριστος (aristos) meaning "best" and τέλος (telos) meaning "purpose, aim". This was the name of a Greek philosopher of the 4th century BC who made lasting contributions to Western thought, including the fields of logic, metaphysics, ethics and biology.
Ashling f Irish
Anglicized form of Aisling.
Aulay m Scottish
Anglicized form of Amhlaidh.
Barry m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Barra.
Belshazzar m Babylonian (Anglicized), Biblical
From בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר (Belshatzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Bel-sharra-usur meaning "Bel protect the king". This was the name of the son of Nabonidus, the last king of the Babylonian Empire before the Persians conquered it in the 6th century BC. In the Old Testament Book of Daniel Belshazzar is the last king of Babylon who sees the mystical handwriting on the wall, which is interpreted by Daniel to portend the end of the empire.
Blanid f Irish
Anglicized form of Bláthnat.
Bree f English
Anglicized form of Brígh. It can also be a short form of Brianna, Gabriella and other names containing bri.
Bridget f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid, Old Irish Brigit, from old Celtic *Brigantī meaning "the exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
Bridie f Irish
Anglicized diminutive of Bríd.
Bronagh f Irish
Anglicized form of Brónach.
Bronte m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh, itself derived from the given name Proinnteach, probably from Irish bronntach meaning "generous". The Brontë sisters — Charlotte, Emily, and Anne — were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
Cadogan m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cadwgan.
Caelan m & f English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caolán or Caoilfhionn.
Canute m History
Anglicized form of Knut.
Carrol m & f English
Variant of Carroll (masculine) or Carol 1 (feminine).
Carroll m Irish
Anglicized form of Cearbhall. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Casey m & f English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh, a patronymic derived from the given name Cathassach. This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
Cassian m Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from Cassius. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
Cleena f Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Clíodhna.
Cletus m English
Short form of Anacletus. This name is sometimes used to refer to the third pope, Saint Anacletus. It can also function as an Anglicized form of Kleitos.
Colin 1 m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Scottish Cailean.
Confucius m History
Anglicized form of the Chinese name Kong Fuzi. The surname (Kong) means "hole, opening" and the title 夫子 (Fuzi) means "master". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Chinese philosopher. His given name was Qiu.
Conley m Irish
Anglicized form of Conleth.
Cupid m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Cupido meaning "desire". This was the name of the Roman god of love, the son of Venus and Mars. He was portrayed as a winged, blindfolded boy, armed with a bow and arrows, which caused the victim to fall in love. His Greek equivalent was Eros.
Darina 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Dáirine.
Dashiell m English (Rare)
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
Declan m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, Old Irish Declán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to the Déisi peoples of Ireland and the founder of the monastery at Ardmore.... [more]
Dermot m Irish
Anglicized form of Diarmaid.
Derval f Irish
Anglicized form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile.
Dervila f Irish
Anglicized form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile.
Dervla f Irish
Anglicized form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile.
Devnet f Irish
Anglicized form of Damhnait.
Donal m Irish
Anglicized form of Domhnall (see Donald).
Dougal m Scottish
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic name Dubhghall meaning "dark stranger", from Old Irish dub "dark" and gall "stranger". This name was borne by a few medieval Scottish chiefs.
Duane m English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Dubháin, itself derived from the given name Dubhán. Usage in America began around the start of the 20th century. It last appeared on the top 1000 rankings in 2002, though the variant Dwayne lingered a few years longer.
Eavan f Irish
Anglicized form of Aoibheann.
Eileen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Eibhlín. It is also sometimes considered an Irish form of Helen. It first became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland near the end of the 19th century.
Eilish f Irish
Anglicized form of Eilís.
Elfleda f English (Archaic)
Middle English form of both the Old English names Æðelflæd and Ælfflæd. These names became rare after the Norman Conquest, but Elfleda was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Ellar m Scottish
Anglicized form of Ealar.
Elva 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Ailbhe.
Ena 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Enya f Irish
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Etna f Various
From the name of an active volcano on the island of Sicily, Italy.
Euclid m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Εὐκλείδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory" with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
Evan m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Ifan, a Welsh form of John.
Evander 2 m Scottish
Anglicized form of Iomhar.
Farrell m English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fearghail, derived from the given name Fearghal.
Fenella f Scottish
Form of Fionnuala used by Walter Scott for a character in his novel Peveril of the Peak (1823).
Fergal m Irish, Old Irish
Means "man of valour", derived from the Old Irish elements fer "man" and gal "valour". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Ireland. As well as the Old Irish form of the name, this is the usual Anglicization of the Modern Irish form Fearghal.
Fergus m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Old Irish elements fer "man" and guss "vigour, strength, force". This was the name of several early rulers of Ireland and Dál Riata, as well as many characters from Irish legend. Notably it was borne by the hero Fergus mac Róich, who was tricked into giving up the kingship of Ulster to Conchobar. However, he remained loyal to the new king until Conchobar betrayed Deirdre and Naoise, at which point he defected to Connacht in anger. The name was also borne by an 8th-century saint, a missionary to Scotland.... [more]
Fillin m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Finella f Scottish
Variant of Fenella.
Finley m & f English
Variant of Finlay. This is by far the preferred spelling in the United States, where it has lately been more common as a feminine name.
Finola f Irish
Anglicized form of Fionnuala.
Fionola f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Fionnuala.
Ganymede m Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From Greek Γανυμήδης (Ganymedes), which was possibly derived from γάνυμαι (ganymai) meaning "to be glad" and μήδεα (medea) meaning "plans, counsel, cunning". In Greek mythology this was the name of a beautiful boy who was abducted by Zeus to become the cupbearer to the gods, the successor of Hebe. A moon of Jupiter is named after him.
Glendower m Welsh
Anglicized form of Glyndwr.
Heber 1 m Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Éibhear.
Howell m Welsh
Anglicized form of Hywel.
Ishbel f Scottish
Anglicized form of Iseabail.
Ita f Irish
Anglicized form of Íde.
Joaquin m Spanish (Americanized)
Unaccented form of Joaquín used mainly in America.
Jose m Spanish (Americanized, Filipinized)
Unaccented form of José used mainly in America and the Philippines.
Jove m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iovis, derived from the stem of Iuppiter (see Jupiter). This was another name of the Roman god Jupiter.
Jovian m Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From Latin Iovianus, a Roman cognomen that was a derivative of Iovis (see Jove). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor.
Juliet f English
Anglicized form of Juliette or Giulietta. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Jupiter m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyew-pater, composed of the elements Dyews (see Zeus) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
Kane m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Catháin, derived from the given name Cathán.
Kaolin m English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caolán. This is also the name of a type of clay.
Kathleen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Caitlín.
Kean m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, a variant of Kane.
Keavy f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caoimhe.
Keegan m English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which was derived from the given name Aodhagán, a double diminutive of Aodh.
Keelan m Irish
Anglicized form of Caolán.
Keely f English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe, itself derived from the given name Caoladhe, from Irish caol "slender".
Keenan m Irish
Anglicized form of Cianán.
Keeva f Irish
Anglicized form of Caoimhe.
Kellan m English (Modern)
Variant of Kellen. This particular spelling jumped in popularity after actor Kellan Lutz (1985-) appeared in the Twilight series of movies beginning 2008.
Kellen m English (Modern)
Possibly from a German surname, itself derived from Middle Low German kel "swampy area". This name began to be used in the United States in the early 1980s after the American football player Kellen Winslow (1957-) began his professional career.
Kelly m & f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name Ceallach or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).... [more]
Kenneth m Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Anglicized form of both Coinneach and Cináed. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his 1825 novel The Talisman. A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote The Wind in the Willows.
Kevin m English, Irish, French (Modern), Spanish (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín meaning "beloved birth", derived from Old Irish Cóemgein, composed of cóem "dear, beloved, gentle" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
Kieran m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Lir m Irish Mythology
Possibly from the patronymic Manannán mac Lir, in which case Lir is the genitive case of the name Ler. The medieval Irish legend the Children of Lir tells how Lir of the Tuatha Dé Danann had his children transformed into swans by his third wife Aoife. The legendary characters Lir and Ler seem to be distinct.
Macbeth m History
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic given name Mac Beatha meaning "son of life", implying holiness. This was the name of an 11th-century Scottish king. Shakespeare based his play Macbeth loosely on this king's life.
Maeve f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. She and her husband Ailill fought against the Ulster king Conchobar and the hero Cúchulainn, as told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Mahomet m Arabic (Anglicized)
Archaic transcription of Muhammad, based on the usual Latin spelling Mahometus.
Malachy m Irish
Anglicized form of Máel Sechnaill or Máel Máedóc, influenced by the spelling of Malachi. Saint Malachy (in Irish, Máel Máedóc) was a 12th-century archbishop of Armagh renowned for his miracles.
Maura 2 f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Máire. It has also been associated with Irish mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish martyr.
Maureen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Máirín.
Mavourneen f Irish (Rare)
Derived from the Irish phrase mo mhúirnín meaning "my darling".
Monat f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Muadhnait.
Morna f Scottish
Anglicized form of Muirne used by James Macpherson in his poem Fingal (1761), in which it is borne by the mother of the hero Fingal.
Murdo m Scottish
Anglicized form of Murchadh.
Murdoch m Scottish
Anglicized form of Muireadhach.
Murna f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Muirne.
Murrough m Irish
Anglicized form of Murchadh.
Myrna f Irish (Rare), English
Anglicized form of Muirne. The popularity of this name spiked in the United States in the 1930s due to the fame of the actress Myrna Loy (1905-1933).
Ness 1 f Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of Neasa.
Nessa 3 f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Neasa.
Nevan m Irish
Anglicized form of Naomhán.
Neve f Irish
Anglicized form of Niamh.
Noreen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Nóirín.
Norene f English
Variant of Noreen.
Nyree f English (New Zealand)
Anglicized form of Ngaire. It was borne by New Zealand actress Nyree Dawn Porter (1936-2001).
Odran m Irish
Anglicized form of Odhrán.
Oran m Irish
Anglicized form of Odhrán.
Orla 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Órlaith.
Orlagh f Irish
Anglicized form of Órlaith.
Orna 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Odharnait.
Orrin m Irish
Anglicized form of Odhrán.
Owen 1 m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Owain.
Owen 2 m Irish
Anglicized form of Eoghan.
Phelan m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Rafferty m English
From an Irish surname, itself derived from the given name Rabhartach meaning "flood tide".
Raiden m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (den) meaning "lightning". This is a regional epithet of the Japanese god Raijin.
Rameses m Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
From Ῥαμέσσης (Rhamesses), the Greek form of Egyptian rꜥ-ms-sw meaning "born of Ra", composed of the name of the supreme god Ra combined with the root msj "be born". Rameses was the name of eleven Egyptian kings of the New Kingdom. The most important of these were Rameses II the Great who campaigned against the Hittites and also built several great monuments, and Rameses III who defended Egypt from the Libyans and Sea Peoples.
Reagan f & m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Riagáin, derived from the given name Riagán. This surname was borne by American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).... [more]
Reece m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Rhys.
Rees m Welsh
Anglicized form of Rhys.
Reese m & f Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Rhys. It is also used as a feminine name, popularized by the American actress Reese Witherspoon (1976-).
Rhett m English
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
Riordan m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Ríoghbhárdáin), which was derived from the given name Rígbarddán.
Ronan m Breton, Irish, French, English (Modern)
Breton and Anglicized form of Rónán.
Ronit 1 f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Rathnait.
Rory m & f Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Ruaidhrí. Typically a masculine name, it gained some popularity for girls in the United States after it was used on the television series Gilmore Girls (2000-2007), in this case as a nickname for Lorelai. Despite this, the name has grown more common for boys in America, especially after 2011, perhaps due to Northern Irish golfer Rory McIlroy (1989-).
Rosheen f Irish
Anglicized form of Róisín.
Rowan m & f Irish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ruadhán. As an English name, it can also be derived from the surname Rowan, itself derived from the Irish given name. It could also be given in reference to the rowan tree, a word of Old Norse origin (coincidentally sharing the same Indo-European root meaning "red" with the Irish name).
Roy m Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Ruadh. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
Saladin m History
Anglicized form of Salah ad-Din.
Scheherazade f Literature
Anglicized form of Shahrazad.
Sean m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Seán. This name name, along with variants Shawn and Shaun, began to be be used in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland around the middle of the 20th century.
Senan m Irish
Anglicized form of Senán.
Shamus m Irish
Anglicized form of Séamus.
Shan f Welsh
Anglicized form of Siân.
Shane m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Seán. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
Shaun m English
Anglicized form of Seán. This is the more common spelling in the United Kingdom and Australia, while Shawn is preferred in the United States and Canada (though it got a boost in America after the singer Shaun Cassidy released his debut album in 1976).
Shavonne f English (Modern), African American (Modern)
Anglicized form of Siobhán. In some cases it might be considered a combination of the phonetic element sha and Yvonne.
Shawn m & f English
Anglicized form of Seán, occasionally used as a feminine form. This is the most common spelling of this name in the United States and Canada, with Shaun being more typical in the United Kingdom and Australia.
Shay 1 m & f Irish
Anglicized form of Séaghdha, sometimes used as a feminine name.
Shea m & f Irish
Anglicized form of Séaghdha, sometimes used as a feminine name.
Sheamus m Irish
Anglicized form of Séamus.
Sheena f Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Sìne. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
Sheherazade f Literature
Anglicized form of Shahrazad.
Sheila f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Síle.
Sholto m Scottish
Probably an Anglicized form of Gaelic sìoltaich meaning "sower, propagator". It has occasionally been used in the Douglas family since the 17th century, after David Hume of Godscroft claimed it was the name of the 7th-century founder of the clan.
Shona f Scottish
Anglicized form of Seonag or Seònaid. Though unconnected, this is also the name of an ethnic group who live in southern Africa, mainly Zimbabwe.
Sive f Irish
Anglicized form of Sadhbh.
Somerled m Old Norse (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Sumarliði meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Norse-Gaelic king of Mann and the Scottish Isles.
Sorley m Scottish
Anglicized form of Somhairle.
Spiro m Greek (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Spyros.
Spyro m Greek (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Spyros.
Sweeney m Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Suibhne. In fiction, this name is borne by the murderous barber Sweeney Todd, first appearing in the British serial The String of Pearls: A Romance (1846-1847).
Tara 1 f English
Anglicized form of the Irish place name Teamhair, which possibly means "elevated place". This was the name of the sacred hill near Dublin where the Irish high kings resided. It was popularized as a given name by the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939), in which it is the name of the O'Hara plantation.
Tashina f Indigenous American, Sioux (Anglicized)
From Lakota Tȟašína meaning "her blanket", derived from šiná "blanket, shawl". This is the first part of the name of historic figures such as Tȟašína Lúta, called Red Blanket, or Tȟašína Máni, called Moving Robe Woman.
Taskill m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Tasgall.
Tavish m Scottish
Anglicized form of a Thàmhais, vocative case of Tàmhas. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname McTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Tàmhas".
Teagan f English (Modern)
Variant of Tegan. It also coincides with a rare Irish surname Teagan. This name rose on the American popularity charts in the 1990s, probably because of its similarity to names like Megan and Reagan.
Teague m Irish
Anglicized form of Tadhg. This name is also used as a slang term for an Irish Catholic.
Teige m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Tadhg.
Teigue m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Tadhg.
Tiernan m Irish
Anglicized form of Tighearnán.
Tierney m Irish
Anglicized form of Tighearnach.
Tighe m Irish
Anglicized form of Tadhg.
Toal m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Túathal.
Torquil m Scottish
Anglicized form of Torcall.
Turin m Literature
Means "victory mood" in the fictional language Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Turin was a cursed hero, the slayer of the dragon Glaurung. He was also called Turambar, Mormegil, and other names. This is also the Anglicized name of the city of Torino in Italy.
Turlough m Irish
Anglicized form of Toirdhealbhach.
Ulick m Irish
Anglicized form of Uilleag.
Winifred f English, Welsh
From Latin Winifreda, possibly from a Welsh name Gwenfrewi (maybe influenced by the Old English masculine name Winfred). Saint Winifred was a 7th-century Welsh martyr, probably legendary. According to the story, she was decapitated by a prince after she spurned his advances. Where her head fell there arose a healing spring, which has been a pilgrimage site since medieval times. Her story was recorded in the 12th century by Robert of Shrewsbury, and she has been historically more widely venerated in England than in Wales. The name has been used in England since at least the 16th century.
Yorath m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Iorwerth.
Zara 1 f Literature, English
Used by William Congreve for a character in his tragedy The Mourning Bride (1697), where it belongs to a captive North African queen. Congreve may have based it on the Arabic name Zahra. In 1736 the English writer Aaron Hill used it to translate Zaïre for his popular adaptation of Voltaire's French play Zaïre (1732).... [more]
Zephyr m Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Ζέφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.