Names Categorized "friendship"

This is a list of names in which the categories include friendship.
gender
usage
ABD AL-WALI m Arabic
Means "servant of the guardian" from Arabic عبد ال ('abd al) meaning "servant of the" combined with ولِي (wali) meaning "guardian, friend".
ABDUWELI m Uyghur
Uyghur form of ABD AL-WALI.
ADALWIN m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements adal "noble" and win "friend".
ÆLFWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman Conquest.
ÆÐELWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest. Saint Æðelwine was a 7th-century bishop of Lindsey, England.
ALBOIN m Ancient Germanic
Form of ALFWIN. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Lombards who began the Lombard conquest of Italy.
ALDWIN m Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and win "friend".
ALFVIN m Ancient Scandinavian
From the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and vinr "friend".
ALFWIN m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements alf "elf" and win "friend".
ALVENA f English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
ALVIN m English, Swedish
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the Old English names. As a Scandinavian name it is derived from Alfvin, an Old Norse cognate of Ælfwine.
ALWIN m German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From either of the two Germanic names ALFWIN or ADALWIN.
ALWINE f German (Rare)
Feminine form of ALWIN.
AMICE f Medieval English
Medieval name derived from Latin amicus meaning "friend". This was a popular name in the Middle Ages, though it has since become uncommon.
AMIKA f Esperanto
Means "friendly" in Esperanto, ultimately from Latin amicus "friend".
AMIS m Medieval English, Medieval French
Medieval name, a masculine form of AMICE. It appears in the medieval French poem Amis and Amiles, about two friends who make sacrifices for one another.
AMISTA f Chamorro
Means "loyalty" in Chamorro, derived from Spanish amistad "friendship".
AMIT (2) m & f Hebrew
Means "friend" in Hebrew.
AMITY f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
AMYAS m English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of AMIS. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
ANAS m Arabic
Means "friendliness" in Arabic. This was the name of one of the Prophet Muhammad's companions.
ANIS m Arabic
Means "friendly, friend" in Arabic.
ANISA f Arabic, Indonesian
Feminine form of ANIS.
ANISSA f English
This name was first brought to public attention in 1966 by the child actress Anissa Jones (1958-1976). In her case it was a transcription of the Arabic name أنيسة (see ANISA), given to honour her Lebanese heritage. Other parents who have since used this name may view it simply as an elaboration of ANNA using the popular name suffix issa.
ARDUINO m Italian
Italian form of HARTWIN.
ASTROPHEL m Literature
Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star" and φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This name was first used by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney in his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella.
BALDOVIN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of BALDWIN.
BALDWIN m English, Ancient Germanic
Means "bold friend", derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and win "friend". In the Middle Ages this was a popular name in Flanders and among the Normans, who brought it to Britain. It was borne by one of the leaders of the First Crusade, an 11th-century nobleman from Flanders. After the crusaders conquered Jerusalem, he was crowned as the king of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
BELLAMY f & m English (Modern)
From a surname derived from Old French bel ami meaning "beautiful friend".
BENIGNO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Benignus, which meant "kind, friendly". This was the name of several saints including a 5th-century disciple of Saint Patrick who later became the chief Bishop of Ireland.
BENIGNUS m Late Roman
Late Latin form of BENIGNO.
BUDDY m English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
DAKOTA m & f English (Modern)
From the name of the Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley, or from the two American states that were named for them: North and South Dakota (until 1889 unified as the Dakota Territory). The tribal name means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language.
DEORWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wine "friend".
EALDWINE m Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
EBURWIN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of EOFORWINE.
EDWIN m English, Dutch
Means "rich friend", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman Conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EDWINA f English
Feminine form of EDWIN.
ELVIN m English
Variant of ALVIN.
EMRE m Turkish
Means "friend, brother" in Turkish. This name was borne by the 13th-century Turkish poet Yunus Emre.
ENYINNAYA m Western African, Igbo
Means "his father's friend" in Igbo.
EOFORWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
ERVĪNS m Latvian
Latvian form of ERWIN.
ERWIN m German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
ETELVINA f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of ADALWIN.
FAUNUS m Roman Mythology
Possibly means "to befriend" from Latin. Faunus was a Roman god of fertility, forests, and agriculture.
GAUTVIN m Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of GOSWIN.
GLÆDWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GODWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend". This was the name of the powerful 11th-century Earl of Wessex, the father of King Harold II of England.
GOSWIN m Dutch (Archaic)
Germanic name derived from the elements gaut "Geat, Goth" and win "friend".
GURMEET m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "teacher, guru" and मित्र (mitra) meaning "friend".
GUÐNI m Icelandic
Icelandic form of GUÐINI.
HABIBULLAH m Arabic
Means "friend of ALLAH", from Arabic حبيب (habib) meaning "friend" combined with الله (Allah).
HALİL m Turkish
Turkish form of KHALIL.
HARDWIN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HARTWIN.
HARIWINI m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ERWIN.
HARTWIN m German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".
HỮU m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (hữu) meaning "friend, companion".
INAS f Arabic
Means "friendliness" in Arabic.
JEDIDIAH m Biblical
Means "beloved of YAHWEH" in Hebrew, derived from יָדִיד (yadid) meaning "beloved, friend" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is a name given to Solomon by Nathan.
KHALEEL m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic خليل (see KHALIL).
KHALIL m Arabic
Means "friend" in Arabic.
KHALILAH f Arabic
Feminine form of KHALIL.
LEOBWIN m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements leub "dear, beloved" and win "friend", making it a cognate of LEOFWINE.
LEOFWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend". This was the name of an 8th-century English saint, also known as Lebuin, who did missionary work in Frisia.
LEUTWIN m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements leud "people" and win "friend". Saint Leutwin was an 8th-century bishop of Trier.
LEVIN m German (Rare)
German form of LEOBWIN.
LEWIN m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LIEVEN m Flemish
Flemish form of LEOBWIN.
LIEVIN m Flemish
Flemish form of LEOBWIN.
LUDIVINE f French
Possibly from a feminine form of LEUTWIN. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the television miniseries Les Gens de Mogador.
MALDWYN m Welsh
Welsh form of BALDWIN.
MEHR m & f Persian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of MITHRA. As a Persian vocabulary word it means "friendship" and "sun". It is also the name of the seventh month of the Persian calendar. All these derive from the same source: the Indo-Iranian root *mitra meaning "oath, covenant, agreement".
MESHULAM m Hebrew
Modern Hebrew transcription of MESHULLAM.
MESHULLAM m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means either "paid for" or "friend" in Hebrew. This is the name of many characters in the Old Testament.
MITRA (2) f Persian
Modern variant of MITHRA used as a feminine name. The true Modern Persian form of Mithra is in fact Mehr.
NADEEM m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic نديم or Urdu ندیم (see NADIM).
NADIM m Arabic, Urdu
Means "drinking companion", derived from Arabic ندم (nadima) meaning "to drink together".
NAJI m Arabic
Means "intimate friend" in Arabic. This can also be another way of transcribing the name ناجي (see NAAJI).
NEDİM m Turkish
Turkish form of NADIM.
NEDIM m Bosnian
Bosnian form of NADIM.
ORTWIN m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and win "friend".
OSWIN m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman Conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
PAMPHILOS m Ancient Greek
Means "friend of all" from Greek πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and φίλος (philos) meaning "friend".
PÁNFILO m Spanish
Spanish form of PAMPHILOS.
PANFILO m Italian
Italian form of PAMPHILOS. The Italian novelist Boccaccio used this name in his work The Decameron (1350).
PHIL m English
Short form of PHILIP and various other names beginning with Phil, often a Greek element meaning "friend, dear, beloved".
PHILANDER m English (Archaic), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φίλανδρος (Philandros) meaning "friend of man" from Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). It was the name of a son of Apollo with the nymph Acalle. In the 18th century this was coined as a word meaning "to womanize", and the name subsequently dropped out of use.
PHILE f Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Philon (see PHILO).
PHILIBERT m French
Early variant of FILIBERT altered by association with Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover". This was the name of a 7th-century Frankish saint. Another famous bearer was Philibert de l'Orme (1510-1570), a French Renaissance architect.
PHILIP m English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φίλιππος (Philippos) meaning "friend of horses", composed of the elements φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
PHILIPPA f English (British), German
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PHILO m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φίλων (Philon), which was derived from φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This was the name of a 1st-century Hellenistic Jewish philosopher and theologian from Alexandria.
PHILOKRATES m Ancient Greek
Means "friend of power" from Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend" and κράτος (kratos) meaning "power".
PHILOMEL f Literature
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
PHILOMELA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Φιλομήλη (Philomele), derived from φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend" and μῆλον (melon) meaning "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μέλος (melos) meaning "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PHILOMENA f English, German, Late Greek
From Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in 1802 after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομήνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
PHILON m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of PHILO.
PHILOTHEOS m Ancient Greek
Means "friend of god" from Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend" and θεός (theos) meaning "god".
PIRIPI m Maori
Maori form of PHILIP.
RAFIQ m Arabic, Urdu
Means either "friend" or "gentle" in Arabic.
RAFIQA f Arabic
Feminine form of RAFIQ.
REFİK m Turkish
Turkish form of RAFIQ.
REUEL m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "friend of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is another name for Jethro. The fantasy author John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (1892-1973) was a famous bearer.
REUT f Hebrew
Means "friendship‏‏‏‏" in Hebrew, making it a variant of the Biblical name Ruth.
RHOUTH f Biblical Greek
Form of RUTH (1) used in the Greek Old Testament.
RUF f Russian
Russian form of RUTH (1).
RÚT f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of RUTH (1).
RUT f Spanish, Icelandic, Swedish, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Form of RUTH (1) in several languages.
RŪTA f Lithuanian, Latvian
Means "rue" in Lithuanian, the rue plant being a bitter medicinal herb that is a national symbol of Lithuania. This is also the Lithuanian and Latvian form of RUTH (1).
RUTE f Portuguese
Portuguese form of RUTH (1).
RUTH (1) f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
RUTHIE f English
Diminutive of RUTH (1).
RUTT f Estonian
Estonian form of RUTH (1).
RUUT f Finnish
Finnish form of RUTH (1).
SÆWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wine "friend".
SAMEER (1) m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic سمير (see SAMIR (1)).
SAMEERA (1) f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic سميرة (see SAMIRA (1)).
SAMİR m Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of SAMIR (1).
SAMIR (1) m Arabic
Means "companion in evening talk" in Arabic, from the root سَمَرَ (samara) meaning "to talk in the evening".
SAMIRA (1) f Arabic, Persian
Feminine form of SAMIR (1).
SELWYN m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".
SEMİR m Turkish
Turkish form of SAMIR (1).
THEOPHILUS m Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεόφιλος (Theophilos) meaning "friend of god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and φίλος (philos) meaning "friend". In the New Testament the evangelist Luke addresses his gospel and the Book of Acts to a man named Theophilus.
TOMOKO f Japanese
From Japanese (tomo) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (tomo) meaning "friend" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed of other kanji characters as well.
TOMOMI f & m Japanese
From Japanese (tomo) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (tomo) meaning "friend" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
WENCHE f Norwegian
Norwegian variant of WENKE. A famous bearer is the Norwegian singer Wenche Myhre (1947-), known as Wencke in some countries so as to avoid pronunciation confusion.
WENDY f English
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
WENKE f Low German
Low German diminutive of Germanic names containing the element win meaning "friend".
WINA f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element win meaning "friend".
WINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
WINFRED m English
Means "friend of peace" from the Old English elements wine "friend" and friþ "peace". This was the birth name of the 8th-century missionary Saint Boniface. It became rare after the Norman Conquest, though it was revived in the 19th century.
WINFRIED m German
German form of WINFRED.
WINFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WINFRED.
WINIFRID m Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of WINFRIÐ.
WYNNE (2) m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name WINE.
YARA (1) f Arabic
From Persian یار (yar) meaning "friend, helper".
YAREN f Turkish
Means "close friend", derived from Persian یاران (yaran).
YARITZA f Spanish (Latin American)
Elaborated form of YARA (1) or YARA (2) (using the same suffix as MARITZA).
YUMI f Japanese
From Japanese (yumi) meaning "archery bow". It can also come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause", (yu) meaning "friend" or a nanori reading of (yu) meaning "archery bow" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji or kanji combinations are also possible.