Names Categorized "virtues"

This is a list of names in which the categories include virtues.
gender
usage
Aali m Arabic
Means "high, lofty, sublime" in Arabic.
Aaliyah f Arabic, English (Modern), African American (Modern)
Feminine form of Aali. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the singer Aaliyah Haughton (1979-2001), who was known simply as Aaliyah. This name received a boost in popularity after she released her debut album in 1994, and also in 2001 after her untimely death in an airplane crash.
Abd al-Rahman m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic عبد الرحمٰن (see Abd ar-Rahman).
Abrar f & m Arabic, Urdu, Bengali
Means "virtuous" in Arabic. It is typically feminine in the Arab world, and typically masculine in Pakistan, India and Bangladesh.
Adalet f Turkish
Means "justice" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic عدل ('adala) meaning "to act justly".
Adela f English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Old German element adal meaning "noble" (Proto-Germanic *aþalaz). Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
Adelaide f English, Italian, Portuguese
Means "nobleness, nobility", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of adal "noble" and the suffix heit "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great.... [more]
Adele f German, English, Italian
Form of Adela used in several languages. A famous bearer was the dancer and actress Adele Astaire (1896-1981). It was also borne by the British singer Adele Adkins (1988-), known simply as Adele. Shortly after she released her debut album in 2008 the name reentered the American top 1000 chart after a 40-year absence.
Adil m Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur
Means "fair, honest, just" in Arabic, from the root عدل ('adala) meaning "to act justly". This name was borne by several sultans of Bijapur.
Adila f Arabic
Feminine form of Adil.
Adilet m Kyrgyz, Kazakh
Means "justice" in Kyrgyz and Kazakh, ultimately from Arabic عدل ('adala) meaning "to act justly".
Afaf f Arabic
Means "chastity" in Arabic.
Affan m Arabic
From Arabic عفّ ('aff) meaning "chaste, modest, pure". This was the name of the father of the caliph Uthman.
Afif m Arabic
Means "chaste" in Arabic.
Agamemnon m Greek Mythology, Greek
Possibly means "very steadfast" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was the brother of Menelaus. He led the Greek expedition to Troy to recover his brother's wife Helen. After the Trojan War Agamemnon was killed by his wife Clytemnestra.
Agatha f English, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀγαθή (Agathe), derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
Agaue f Greek Mythology
Means "illustrious, noble" in Greek. This was the mother of Pentheus in Greek myth.
Age 2 f Estonian
Estonian form of Agnes.
Aggie f English
Diminutive of Agnes or Agatha.
Ági f Hungarian
Diminutive of Ágota or Ágnes.
Agnė f Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Agnes.
Ágnes f Hungarian
Hungarian form of Agnes.
Agnès f French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of Agnes.
Agnes f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
Agnesa f Slovak, Albanian
Slovak and Albanian form of Agnes.
Agnese f Italian, Latvian
Italian and Latvian form of Agnes.
Agnessa f Russian
Russian form of Agnes.
Agneta f Swedish
Swedish variant of Agnes.
Agnete f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of Agnes.
Agnetha f Swedish
Swedish variant of Agnes.
Agnethe f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of Agnes.
Agneza f Croatian
Croatian form of Agnes.
Agnieszka f Polish
Polish form of Agnes.
Agnija f Serbian, Macedonian, Latvian
Serbian, Macedonian and Latvian form of Agnes.
Ahava f Hebrew
Means "love" in Hebrew.
Ai 1 f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
Ai 2 f Chinese
From Chinese (ài) meaning "love, affection", (ǎi) meaning "friendly, lush", or other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Aignéis f Irish
Irish form of Agnes.
Aitor m Basque, Spanish
Possibly means "good fathers" from Basque aita "father" and on "good". This was the name of a legendary ancestor of the Basques.
Akakios m Greek, Ancient Greek
From a Greek word meaning "innocent, not evil", derived from (a), a negative prefix, combined with κάκη (kake) meaning "evil". This was the name of three early saints, two of whom were martyred.
Aki 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright, light, clear" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
Akram m Arabic
Means "most generous" in Arabic (a superlative form of Karim).
Alaia 1 f Basque
Means "joyful, happy" from Basque alai.
Alethea f English
Derived from Greek ἀλήθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 16th century.
Alheri f Hausa
Means "the charitable, the good" in Hausa, from Arabic خير (khayr).
Aliza f Hebrew
Means "joyful" in Hebrew.
Alkmini f Greek
Modern Greek form of Alcmene.
Altagracia f Spanish (Caribbean)
Means "high grace", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de la Altagracia, meaning "Our Lady of High Grace". She is considered the patron saint of the Dominican Republic, and it is there that this name is most often used.
Amaal f Arabic
Means "hopes, aspirations" in Arabic.
Amal 1 f & m Arabic
Means "hope, aspiration" in Arabic. It is related to Amaal.
Amandeep m & f Indian (Sikh)
From Punjabi ਅਮਨ (aman) meaning "peace" (ultimately from Arabic) and Sanskrit दीप (dipa) meaning "lamp, light".
Amara f Igbo
Means "grace" in Igbo.
Amarachi f Igbo
Means "God's grace" in Igbo.
Amatus m Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "beloved". The 7th-century Saint Amatus was the first abbot of Remiremont Abbey.
Amel 1 m Bosnian
Bosnian masculine form of Amal 1.
Amel 2 f Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic أمال (see Amaal) chiefly used in North Africa.
Amela f Bosnian
Bosnian feminine form of Amal 1.
Ami 1 m Biblical
Means "trustworthy, reliable" in Hebrew. This was the name of a servant of King Solomon in the Old Testament.
Amice f Medieval English
Medieval name derived from Latin amicus meaning "friend". This was a popular name in the Middle Ages, though it has since become uncommon.
Amika f Esperanto
Means "friendly" in Esperanto, ultimately from Latin amicus "friend".
Amin m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Derived from Arabic أمين (amin) meaning "truthful". This was the name of the sixth Abbasid caliph.
Aminah 2 f Arabic
Feminine form of Amin.
Amista f Chamorro
Means "loyalty" in Chamorro, derived from Spanish amistad "friendship".
Amity f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
Amnon m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Hebrew
Means "faithful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the eldest son of King David. He was killed by his half-brother Absalom in revenge for the rape of his sister Tamar.
An 1 m & f Chinese, Vietnamese
From Chinese (ān) meaning "peace, quiet" or other characters with a similar pronunciation. As a Vietnamese name, it is derived from Sino-Vietnamese meaning "safe, secure".
Anargyros m Greek
From the Greek term ἀνάργυρος (anargyros) meaning "poor, incorruptible", derived from Greek (a), a negative prefix, combined with ἄργυρος (argyros) meaning "silver". This term referred to saints who did not accept payment for their services.
Anis m Arabic
Means "friendly, friend" in Arabic.
Annica f Swedish
Variant of Annika.
Annice f English
Variant of Annis.
Annis f English
Medieval English form of Agnes.
Annora f English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of Honora.
Ansa f Finnish
Derived from Finnish ansio "virtue" or ansa "trap".
Arash m Persian, Persian Mythology
From Avestan 𐬆𐬭𐬆𐬑𐬱𐬀 (Ərəxsha), of uncertain meaning, possibly from a root meaning "bear". In Iranian legend Arash was an archer who was ordered by the Turans to shoot an arrow, the landing place of which would determine the new location of the Iran-Turan border. Arash climbed a mountain and fired his arrow with such strength that it flew for several hours and landed on the banks of the far-away Oxus River.
Ardghal m Irish (Rare)
Means "high valour", derived from the Old Irish elements ard "high" and gal "valour".
Ardito m Italian (Rare)
Derived from medieval Italian ardito meaning "bold".
Arete f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "virtue" in Greek. In Greek mythology Arete was the personification of virtue and excellence.
Aretha f English
Possibly derived from Greek ἀρετή (arete) meaning "virtue". This name was popularized in the 1960s by American singer Aretha Franklin (1942-2018).
Ari 3 m Armenian
Means "brave" in Armenian.
Arman 1 m Persian, Kazakh
Means "wish, hope" in Persian.
Armo m Finnish (Rare)
Means "grace, mercy" in Finnish.
Arnfried m German (Rare)
From an Old German name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and fridu "peace".
Arnifrid m Germanic
Old German form of Arnfried.
Arwyn m Welsh
From the Welsh intensifying prefix ar- and gwyn meaning "white, blessed".
Asha 1 f Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
Ashtad f Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan 𐬀𐬭𐬱𐬙𐬁𐬙 (Arshtāt) meaning "justice, honesty, rightness", derived from 𐬀𐬴𐬀 (asha) meaning "truth, order". This was the name of a Yazata (a holy being) in Zoroastrianism.
Atif m Arabic
Means "affection, kindness" in Arabic.
Atsushi m Japanese
From Japanese (atsushi) meaning "pure" or (atsushi) meaning "kindness, honesty". This name can also be formed from other kanji or kanji combinations.
August m German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of Augustus. This was the name of three Polish kings.... [more]
Augustus m Ancient Roman, Dutch (Rare)
Means "exalted, venerable", derived from Latin augere meaning "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. In 26 BC the senate officially gave him the name Augustus, and after his death it was used as a title for subsequent emperors. This was also the name of three kings of Poland (August in Polish).
Aune f Finnish
Finnish form of Agnes.
Bai m & f Chinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
Bao f & m Chinese
From Chinese (bǎo) meaning "treasure, jewel, precious, rare", (bāo) meaning "praise, honour" or (bāo) meaning "bud" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are possible as well.
Basil 2 m Arabic
Means "brave, valiant" in Arabic.
Basir m Arabic
Means "wise" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition البصير (al-Basir) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
Benigno m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese (Rare)
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Benignus, which meant "kind, friendly". This was the name of several saints including a 5th-century disciple of Saint Patrick who later became the archbishop of Armagh.
Benignus m Late Roman
Late Latin form of Benigno.
Bernard m English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Germanic
Derived from the Old German element bern "bear" combined with hart "hard, firm, brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
Besim 2 m Albanian
Means "faith, trust" in Albanian.
Besnik m Albanian
Means "faithful" in Albanian.
Bình m & f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (bình) meaning "level, even, peaceful".
Blagorodna f Macedonian, Bulgarian
Means "noble" in Macedonian and Bulgarian.
Blandinus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of Blandus.
Blandus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "charming" in Latin.
Blaže m Macedonian
Derived from Macedonian блажен (blažen) meaning "blissful, blessed", ultimately from Old Slavic bolgŭ "good, pleasant".
Blythe f & m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "cheerful" in Old English.
Bogomir m Slovene
Slovene form of Bohumír.
Bogumił m Polish
Means "favoured by God" from the Slavic elements bogŭ "god" and milŭ "gracious, dear".
Bohumír m Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements bogŭ "god" and mirŭ "peace, world".
Bonaccorso m Medieval Italian
Medieval Italian name derived from bono "good" and accorso "haste, rush, help".
Bonnie f English
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie Gone with the Wind (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.
Bounmy m & f Lao
Means "happy", from Lao ບຸນ (boun) meaning "happiness, prosperity, goodness" combined with ມີ (mi) meaning "to have".
Branimir m Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with mirŭ "peace, world".
Bratumił m Polish (Rare)
Derived from the Slavic elements bratŭ "brother" and milŭ "gracious, dear".
Brava f Esperanto
Means "valiant, brave" in Esperanto.
Bujar m Albanian
Means "generous, noble" in Albanian.
Canaan m Biblical
From כְּנַעַן (Kena'an), the Hebrew name of the ancient region of Canaan, which was possibly derived from a root meaning "low, humble". In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Ham. He is said to be the ancestor and namesake of the Canaanite peoples.
Candide m & f French (Rare), Literature
French form of Candidus or Candida. The French philosopher and author Voltaire used this name for the main character (a male) in his satire Candide (1759). In French candide also means "naive", which is descriptive of the book's protagonist.
Caoimhe f Irish
Derived from Irish caomh meaning "dear, beloved, gentle".
Caomh m Irish (Rare)
Means "dear, beloved, gentle" in Irish.
Caridad f Spanish
Means "charity" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Caridad, meaning "Our Lady of Charity". This is the name of the patron saint of Cuba, with a shrine located in the town of El Cobre.
Carissa f English
Variant of Charissa.
Carita f Swedish
Derived from Latin caritas meaning "dearness, esteem, love".
Čedomir m Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic čędo "child" and mirŭ "peace, world".
Čestmír m Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements čĭstĭ "honour" and měrŭ "great, famous" or mirŭ "peace, world".
Chanan m Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Hanan 1.
Chang m & f Chinese
From Chinese (chāng) meaning "flourish, prosper, good, sunlight" (which is usually only masculine), (chàng) meaning "smooth, free, unrestrained" or (cháng) meaning "long". Other Chinese characters are also possible.
Channah f Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of Hannah.
Chara f Greek
Means "happiness, joy" in Greek.
Chares m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian general. It was also borne by the sculptor who crafted the Colossus of Rhodes.
Charikleia f Greek, Ancient Greek
From Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness" and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". This is the name of the heroine of the 3rd-century novel Aethiopica, about the love between Charikleia and Theagenes, written by Heliodorus of Emesa.
Chariklia f Greek
Modern Greek transcription of Charikleia.
Charilaos m Ancient Greek, Greek
Means "grace of the people", derived from Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness" and λαός (laos) meaning "people".
Charis f & m Ancient Greek, Greek
Ancient Greek feminine form of Chares. This was the word (in the singular) for one of the three Graces (plural Χάριτες).... [more]
Charisma f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness".
Charissa f English, Dutch
Elaborated form of Charis. Edmund Spencer used it in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Charita f Various
Latinate form of Charity.
Chariton m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.
Charity f English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation. It is currently most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Chasity f English
Variant of Chastity.
Chastity f English
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the child of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
Chedomir m Macedonian
Alternate transcription of Macedonian Чедомир (see Čedomir).
Chen 2 m & f Hebrew
Means "grace, charm" in Hebrew.
Cheng m & f Chinese
From Chinese (chéng) meaning "completed, finished, succeeded" or (chéng) meaning "sincere, honest, true", as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly.
Chesed f & m Hebrew
Means "kindness, goodness" in Hebrew.
Chidiebere m & f Igbo
Means "God is merciful" in Igbo.
Chifundo m & f Chewa
Means "mercy" in Chewa.
Chika 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Chimwemwe m & f Chewa
Means "joy, pleasure" in Chewa.
Chisomo m & f Chewa
Means "grace" in Chewa.
Chiyembekezo m & f Chewa
Means "hope" in Chewa.
Chrestos m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from Greek χρηστός (chrestos) meaning "useful, good".
Clémence f French
French feminine form of Clementius (see Clement).
Clemence f English
Feminine form of Clementius (see Clement). It has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became rare after the 17th century.
Clemencia f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Clementius (see Clement).
Clemency f English (Rare)
Medieval variant of Clemence. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
Clemens m German, Dutch, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare), Late Roman
Original Latin form of Clement, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
Clement m English
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
Clemente m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Clemens (see Clement).
Clementia f Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Clemens or Clementius (see Clement). In Roman mythology this was the name of the personification of mercy and clemency.
Clémentine f French
French feminine form of Clement. This is also the name of a variety of orange (fruit).
Clementine f English
English form of Clémentine.
Climent m Catalan
Catalan form of Clemens (see Clement).
Cody m English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of both Irish Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of the helpful one" and Mac Óda meaning "son of Odo". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
Comfort f English (African)
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. It is now most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Concordia f Roman Mythology
Means "harmony" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of harmony and peace.
Conleth m Irish
Anglicized form of the Old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "constant fire" from cunnail "prudent, constant" and áed "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.
Conley m Irish
Anglicized form of Conleth.
Conrad m English, German, Germanic
Means "brave counsel", derived from the Old German elements kuoni "brave" and rat "counsel, advice". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes, notably Conrad II, the first of the Holy Roman Emperors from the Salic dynasty. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
Constance f English, French
Medieval form of Constantia. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
Constans m Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "constant, steadfast". This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor, a son of Constantine the Great.
Constantia f Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Constantius, which was itself derived from Constans.
Constantin m Romanian, French
Romanian and French form of Constantinus (see Constantine).
Constantine m History
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of Constans. Constantine the Great (272-337), full name Flavius Valerius Constantinus, was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).
Constantino m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Constantinus (see Constantine).
Cosmas m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κοσμᾶς (Kosmas), which was derived from κόσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
Costanzo m Italian
Italian form of Constans.
Črtomir m Slovene
Derived from Slovene črt "hatred" combined with the Slavic element mirŭ "peace, world". This is the name of the hero in the Slovene national epic Baptism on the Savica (1835) by France Prešeren.
Ctirad m Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements čĭstĭ "honour" and radŭ "happy, willing". In Czech legend this was the name of one of the men tricked by Šárka.
Cuidightheach m Medieval Irish
Irish byname meaning "helpful" (cuidigh means "help").
Curtis m English
From an English surname that originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
Czcibor m Polish (Rare)
Polish form of Ctibor.
Dalimil m Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements dalĭ "distance" and milŭ "gracious, dear".
Dalisay f Tagalog
Means "pure" in Tagalog.
Damir 1 m Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Possibly derived from the Slavic elements danŭ "given" and mirŭ "peace, world". Otherwise, it might be of Turkic or Russian origin (see Damir 2). It was popularized by a character from Marija Jurić Zagorka's novel Gordana (1935).
Damira f Croatian
Feminine form of Damir 1.
Dana 4 m & f Persian, Arabic
Means "wise" in Persian.
Dario m Italian, Croatian
Italian form of Darius.
Darius m English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Persian (Latinized)
Latin form of Greek Δαρεῖος (Dareios), from the Old Persian name 𐎭𐎠𐎼𐎹𐎢𐏁 (Darayauš), shortened from 𐎭𐎠𐎼𐎹𐎺𐎢𐏁 (Darayavauš). It means "possessing goodness", composed of 𐎭𐎠𐎼𐎹 (daraya) meaning "to possess, to hold" and 𐎺𐎢 (vau) meaning "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.... [more]
Dayaram m Hindi
Means "compassion of Rama", from Sanskrit दया (daya) meaning "compassion" combined with the name of the god Rama 1.
Decebal m Romanian
Means "powerful, brave" in Dacian. This was the name adopted by Diurpaneus, a 1st-century king of Dacia. For many years he successfully resisted Roman expansion into his territory but was finally defeated by the forces of Emperor Trajan in 106.
Denag f Middle Persian
Derived from Middle Persian 𐭣𐭩𐭭 (den) meaning "character, conscience, religion". This was the name of several queens consort of the Sasanian Empire.
Dharma m Hindi, Telugu, Nepali
Means "that which is established, law, duty, virtue" in Sanskrit.
Dike f Greek Mythology
Means "justice, custom, order" in Greek. In Greek mythology Dike was the goddess of justice, one of the Ὥραι (Horai).
Dilwen f Welsh
Feminine form of Dilwyn.
Dilwyn m Welsh
From Welsh dilys "genuine" and gwyn "white, blessed". It has been used since the late 19th century.
Dilys f Welsh
Means "genuine" in Welsh. It has been used since the late 19th century.
Dobromil m Czech (Rare)
Derived from the Slavic elements dobrŭ "good" and milŭ "gracious, dear".
Dragomir m Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Romanian
Derived from the Slavic element dorgŭ (South Slavic drag) meaning "precious" combined with mirŭ meaning "peace, world".
Drahomír m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of Dragomir.
Đức m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (đức) meaning "virtue".
Dumuzi m Sumerian Mythology
From Sumerian 𒌉 (dumu) meaning "son, child" and 𒍣 (zid) meaning "true, loyal". This was the name of a Sumerian god of shepherds and vegetation, the husband of Inanna. He was said to spend half of each year in the underworld, resulting in the yearly cycle of seasons. He was known to the Semitic peoples of Mesopotamia as Tammuz.
Dzvonimir m Macedonian
Macedonian form of Zvonimir.
Eastmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Esmond.
Ebele f Igbo
Variant of Ebere.
Ebere f Igbo
Means "mercy, kindness" in Igbo.
Ebrar f & m Turkish
Turkish form of Abrar.
Eda 1 f Turkish
Means "well-mannered" in Turkish.
Edi 2 m Indonesian
Means "beautiful, good" in Javanese.
Effimia f Greek
Modern Greek form of Euphemia.
Egilhard m Germanic
Old German name derived from the elements agil "edge, blade" and hart "hard, firm, brave, hardy". Usually called Eilhart, this was a medieval German poet who wrote an early version of the Tristan and Iseult tale.
Eir f Norse Mythology, Icelandic (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Means "mercy" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse goddess of healing and medicine.
Ekkehard m German, Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements ekka "edge, blade" and hart "hard, firm, brave, hardy". Eckhart von Hochheim was a 13th-century Dominican friar, philosopher and mystic who was accused of heresy during the Inquisition.
Ekwueme m Igbo
Means "one says, one does" in Igbo, indicating a person who is truthful about his behaviour.
Elhanan m Biblical
Means "God is gracious" in Hebrew. This is the name of two Old Testament characters.
Elisedd m Old Welsh
Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind, benevolent". This was the name of two kings of Powys in Wales.
Elpida f Greek
Modern Greek form of Elpis.
Elpídio m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Elpidius.
Elpidio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Elpidius.
Elpidios m Late Greek
Greek form of Elpidius.
Elpidius m Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἐλπίδιος (Elpidios), which was derived from ἐλπίς (elpis) meaning "hope". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who spent twenty years in a cave in Cappadocia.
Elpis f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "hope" in Greek. In Greek mythology Elpis was the personification of hope. She was the last spirit to remain in the jar after Pandora unleashed the evils that were in it.
Eman f Arabic (Egyptian)
Alternate transcription of Arabic إيمان (see Iman). This corresponds more closely with the Egyptian Arabic pronunciation of the name.
Emem m & f Ibibio
Means "peace" in Ibibio.
Emer f Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Irish legend she was the wife of Cúchulainn. She was said to possess the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, needlework, wisdom and chastity.
Emmett m English
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name Emma.
Enoch m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name חֲנוֹך (Chanokh) meaning "dedicated". In Genesis in the Old Testament this is the name of the son of Cain. It is also the name of a son of Jared and the father of Methuselah, who was the supposed author of the apocryphal Books of Enoch.
Enora f Breton, French
Breton form of Honoria, or directly from Breton enor "honour" (a word of Latin origin). This was the name of a 6th-century saint, the wife of Saint Efflamm.
Eòin m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Iohannes (see John) used in the Bible.
Epaphroditos m Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Means "lovely, charming", derived from Greek ἐπί (epi) meaning "on" combined with the name of the Greek love goddess Aphrodite. It appears in the epistle to the Philippians in the New Testament (as Epaphroditus, the Latinized form, in the English version).
Erdem 1 m Turkish
Means "virtue" in Turkish.
Erdoğan m Turkish
From Turkish er "man, hero, brave" and doğan "falcon".
Erkan m Turkish
From Turkish er "man, hero, brave" and kan "blood".
Ernest m English, French, Catalan, Polish, Slovak, Slovene
Derived from Old High German ernust meaning "serious, earnest". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy The Importance of Being Earnest (1895).
Eskarne f Basque (Rare)
Means "mercy" in Basque. It was coined by Sabino Arana in 1910 as an equivalent of the Spanish name Mercedes.
Esmond m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements est "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
Esperanta f Esperanto
Means "hoping" in Esperanto.
Esperanza f Spanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia, which was derived from sperare "to hope".
Euclid m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Εὐκλείδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory" with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
Eudora f Greek Mythology
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
Eudoxia f Ancient Greek
From Greek εὐδοξία (eudoxia) meaning "good repute, good judgement", itself from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δόξα (doxa) meaning "notion, reputation, honour".
Eudoxos m Ancient Greek
From Greek εὔδοξος (eudoxos) meaning "of good repute, honoured", itself from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δόξα (doxa) meaning "notion, reputation, honour". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Greek mathematician and astronomer.
Eufêmia f Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Brazilian Portuguese form of Euphemia.
Eufemia f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Euphemia.
Eugene m English
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὐγένιος (Eugenios), which was derived from the Greek word εὐγενής (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and γενής (genes) meaning "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.... [more]
Eugenio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Eugenius (see Eugene).
Eun m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" or (eun) meaning "silver, money", as well as other hanja characters that are pronounced in the same way. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
Eunice f Biblical, English, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Εὐνίκη (Eunike) meaning "good victory", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and νίκη (nike) meaning "victory". The New Testament mentions her as the mother of Timothy. As an English name, it was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
Eun-Jeong f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" or (eun) meaning "careful, anxious, attentive" combined with (jeong) meaning "courtyard" or (jeong) meaning "pretty, graceful". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Eun-Ji f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" combined with (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "earth, soil, ground". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Eun-Yeong f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" and (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Eun-Young f Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 은영 (see Eun-Yeong).
Euphemia f Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
Eurydice f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Εὐρυδίκη (Eurydike) meaning "wide justice", derived from εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide" and δίκη (dike) meaning "justice, custom, order". In Greek myth she was the wife of Orpheus. Her husband tried to rescue her from Hades, but he failed when he disobeyed the condition that he not look back upon her on their way out.
Eusebia f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Eusebius.
Eusebio m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Eusebius.
Eusebios m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek εὐσεβής (eusebes) meaning "pious", itself derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and σέβω (sebo) meaning "to worship, to honour". This was the name of several saints.
Eusebiu m Romanian
Romanian form of Eusebius.
Eusebius m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eusebios. This was the name of a 4th-century historian of the Christian church.
Eustorgio m Italian (Rare)
From Eustorgius, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὐστόργιος (Eustorgios), which was from the word εὔστοργος (eustorgos) meaning "content", a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and στέργω (stergo) meaning "to love, to be content". Saint Eustorgius was a 6th-century bishop of Milan.
Euterpe f Greek Mythology
Means "delight" in Greek, ultimately from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and τέρπω (terpo) meaning "to satisfy, to cheer". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, the muse of music and joy. She was said to have invented the double flute.
Euthymius m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Εὐθύμιος (Euthymios) meaning "in good spirits, generous", derived from the word εὔθυμος (euthymos), which was composed of the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and θυμός (thymos) meaning "soul, spirit". This was the name of several early saints.
Evadne f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Εὐάδνη (Euadne), from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" possibly combined with Cretan Greek ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". This name was borne by several characters in Greek legend, including the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
Evan m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Ifan, a Welsh form of John.
Everard m English (Rare)
From Everardus, the Latinized form of Eberhard. The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
Facundo m Spanish (Latin American)
From the Late Latin name Facundus, which meant "eloquent". This was the name of a few early saints, including a 3rd-century Spanish martyr.
Fadil m Arabic, Albanian
Means "virtuous, generous" in Arabic.
Fadl m Arabic
Means "grace, generosity" in Arabic. This was a name of both a cousin of Muhammad and a son of Abbas (the son of the fourth caliph Ali).
Faith f English
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Fang f & m Chinese
From Chinese (fāng) meaning "fragrant, virtuous, beautiful" or other characters with a similar pronunciation.
Farah f & m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay
Means "joy, happiness" in Arabic.
Faruq m Arabic
Means "person who can tell right from wrong" in Arabic. This was the name of the last king of Egypt (1920-1965).
Fathima f Indian (Muslim), Malayalam, Sinhalese
Form of Fatimah used by South Indian and Sri Lankan Muslims.
Fatimah f Arabic, Malay, Indonesian
Means "to abstain" in Arabic. Fatimah was a daughter of the Prophet Muhammad and the wife of Ali, the fourth caliph. She is regarded as the exemplary Muslim woman, especially among Shias.
Fe f Spanish
Means "faith" in Spanish, derived from Latin fides.
Fedele m Italian
Italian form of Fidel.
Feidlimid m & f Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Traditionally said to mean "ever good", it might be related to Old Irish feidil "enduring, constant". This was the name of three early kings of Munster. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint, typically called Saint Felim. In Irish legend, it was the name of the father of Deirdre.
Felicia f English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of Felix. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
Felicity f English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name Felicitas. This name jumped in popularity in the United States after the premiere of the television series Felicity in 1998. It is more common in the United Kingdom.
Femke f Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive of Femme.
Ferdinand m German, French, Dutch, English, Slovak, Czech, Slovene, Croatian
From Fredenandus, the Latinized form of a Gothic name composed of the elements friþus "peace" (or perhaps farþa "journey") and nanþa "boldness, daring". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
Fergal m Irish, Old Irish
Means "man of valour", derived from the Old Irish elements fer "man" and gal "valour". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Ireland. As well as the Old Irish form of the name, this is the usual Anglicization of the Modern Irish form Fearghal.
Fiadh f Irish (Modern)
Means "wild, wild animal, deer" (modern Irish fia) or "respect" in Irish.
Fidel m Spanish
From the Late Latin name Fidelis meaning "faithful", a derivative of fides "faith". A famous bearer was the revolutionary leader and Cuban president Fidel Castro (1926-2016).
Fidela f Spanish
Feminine form of Fidel.
Fidelia f Spanish (Rare)
Feminine form of Fidel.
Fidelis m Late Roman
Original form of Fidel.
Fidelma f Irish
Latinized form of Fedelm.
Fido m & f Pet
From Latin fidus meaning "faithful". This a stereotypical name for dogs.
Frank m English, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, French
From an Old German name that referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France, Belgium and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They possibly derived their tribal name from a type of spear that they used, from Proto-Germanic *frankô. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis. In modern times it is sometimes used as a short form of Francis or Franklin.... [more]