Names with "flower" in Description

This is a list of names in which the description contains the keyword flower.
gender
usage
keyword
Abeba f Eastern African, Amharic
Means "flower" in Amharic.
Adonis m Greek Mythology
From Phoenician 𐤀𐤃𐤍 (ʾadon) meaning "lord, master". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see Dumuzi).
Adsila f Indigenous American, Cherokee
From Cherokee ᎠᏥᎳ (atsila) "fire" or ᎠᏥᎸᏍᎩ (atsilunsgi) "flower, blossom".
Albena f Bulgarian
Created by Bulgarian writer Yordan Yovkov for the heroine in his drama Albena (1930). He may have based it on ablen, the name of a type of peony (a flowering plant).
Algernon m English
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy). This name was borne by a character (a mouse) in the short story Flowers for Algernon (1958) and novel of the same title (1966) by the American author Daniel Keyes.
Altantsetseg f Mongolian
Means "golden flower" in Mongolian.
Alyssa f English
Variant of Alicia. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek (a), a negative prefix, combined with λύσσα (lyssa) meaning "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
Amarantha f Various
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek ἀμάραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Ἀμάραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
Amaryllis f Literature
Derived from Greek ἀμαρύσσω (amarysso) meaning "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem Eclogues. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
Anemone f English (Rare)
From the name of the anemone flower, which is derived from Greek ἄνεμος (anemos) meaning "wind".
Anfisa f Russian
Russian form of the Greek name Ἀνθοῦσα (Anthousa), which was derived from Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This was the name of a 9th-century Byzantine saint.
Anh m & f Vietnamese
Often from Sino-Vietnamese (anh) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name is frequently combined with a middle name to create a compound name; the meaning of Anh can change depending on the Sino-Vietnamese characters underlying the compound.
Annagül f Turkmen
Derived from Turkmen anna "Friday" and gül "flower, rose".
Anthea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ἄνθεια (Antheia), derived from ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.
April f English
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
Aster f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Latin from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star".
Ayaka f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour" combined with (ka) or (ka) both meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Ayame f Japanese
From Japanese 菖蒲 (ayame) meaning "iris (flower)". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
Aygül f Turkish, Uyghur, Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic element ay meaning "moon" combined with Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose". In some languages this is also a name for a variety of flowering plant that grows in central Asia (species Fritillaria eduardii).
Ayşegül f Turkish
Combination of Ayşe and Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose".
Azahar f Spanish (Rare)
Means "orange blossom" in Spanish, ultimately from Arabic زهرة (zahrah) meaning "flower". It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Azahar, meaning "Our Lady of the Orange Blossom", because of the citrus trees that surround a church devoted to her near Murcia.
Azalea f English (Modern)
From the name of the flower (shrubs of the genus Rhododendron), ultimately derived from Greek ἀζαλέος (azaleos) meaning "dry".
Bahargül f Turkmen
Derived from Turkmen bahar meaning "spring" and gül meaning "flower, rose" (both roots ultimately of Persian origin).
Baktygul f Kyrgyz
Derived from Persian بخت (bakht) meaning "fortune, happiness" and گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose".
Bláthnat f Irish Mythology
Means "little flower" from Irish bláth "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.
Blejan f Cornish
Means "flower" in Cornish.
Blodeuedd f Welsh Mythology
Means "flowers" in Welsh. This was the original name of Blodeuwedd.
Blodeuwedd f Welsh Mythology
Means "face of flowers" in Welsh. According to the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, she was created out of flowers by Gwydion to be the wife of his nephew Lleu Llaw Gyffes. Originally she was named Blodeuedd meaning simply "flowers". She was eventually transformed into an owl by Gwydion after she and her lover Gronw attempted to murder Lleu, at which point he renamed her Blodeuwedd.
Blodeuyn f Welsh (Rare)
Means "flower" in Welsh.
Blodwen f Welsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is the name of an 1878 Welsh opera by Joseph Parry.
Bluma f Yiddish
From Yiddish בלום (blum) meaning "flower".
Boglárka f Hungarian
Means "buttercup flower" in Hungarian (genus Ranunculus), derived from the archaic word boglár meaning "ornament".
Bolortsetseg f Mongolian
Means "crystal flower" in Mongolian.
Bopha f Khmer
From Pali puppha meaning "flower", written as បុប្ផ (bop) in Khmer, from Sanskrit पुष्प (pushpa).
Calanthe f English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
Calfuray f Indigenous American, Mapuche (Hispanicized)
Means "violet flower" in Mapuche, from kallfü "purple, blue" and rayen "flower".
Camellia f English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
Celandine f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
Celinda f English (Rare)
Probably a blend of Celia and Linda. This is also the Spanish name for a variety of shrub with white flowers, known as sweet mock-orange in English (species Philadelphus coronarius).
Chika 2 f Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (chi) meaning "scatter" combined with (ka) meaning "good, beautiful" or (ka) meaning "flower". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Chrysanta f English (Rare)
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
Chrysanthos m Greek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρύσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden" combined with ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
Clematis f English (Rare)
From the English word for a type of flowering vine, ultimately derived from Greek κλήμα (klema) meaning "twig, branch".
Clover f English (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
Colombina f Italian (Rare)
Italian feminine diminutive of Columba. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
Columbine f English (Rare)
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of Colombina, the pantomime character.
Cvetka f Slovene
Derived from Slovene cvet meaning "blossom, flower".
Daffodil f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, ultimately derived from Dutch de affodil meaning "the asphodel".
Dahlia f English (Modern)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
Daisy f English
Simply from the English word for the white flower, ultimately derived from Old English dægeseage meaning "day eye". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.... [more]
Dalia 1 f Spanish (Latin American), Arabic
Spanish and Arabic form of Dahlia. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
Diantha f Dutch (Rare), English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
Dragoljub m Serbian, Croatian
From the Slavic elements dragu meaning "precious" and lyuby meaning "love". This is also the Serbian and Croatian word for the flowering plant nasturtium (species Tropaeolum majus).
Eglantine f English (Rare)
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It is derived via Old French from Vulgar Latin *aquilentum meaning "prickly". It was early used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story The Prioress's Tale (one of The Canterbury Tales).
Eirlys f Welsh
Means "snowdrop (flower)" in Welsh, a compound of eira "snow" and llys "plant".
Elanor f Literature
Means "star sun" in the fictional language Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien this is Sam's eldest daughter, named after a type of flower.
Endzela f Georgian
Means "snowdrop flower" in Georgian (genus Galanthus).
Euanthe f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek εὐανθής (euanthes) meaning "blooming, flowery", a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". According to some sources, this was the name of the mother of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
Eun-Yeong f Korean
From Sino-Korean (eun) meaning "kindness, mercy, charity" and (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Euthalia f Ancient Greek
Means "flower, bloom" from the Greek word εὐθάλεια (euthaleia), itself derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and θάλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom".
Fioralba f Italian (Rare)
Combination of Italian fiore "flower" and alba "dawn".
Fiore f & m Italian
Means "flower" in Italian. It can also be considered an Italian form of the Latin names Flora and Florus.
Fiorella f Italian
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Fleur f French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. Saint Fleur of Issendolus (Flor in Gascon) was a 14th-century nun from Maurs, France. This was also the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
Flor f Spanish, Portuguese
Either directly from Spanish or Portuguese flor meaning "flower", or a short form of Florencia.
Flora f English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, French, Greek, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
Florinda f Spanish, Portuguese
Elaborated form of Spanish or Portuguese flor meaning "flower".
Florus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was derived from Latin flos meaning "flower".
Flower f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
Garance f French
From the French name for a variety of flowering plant (genus Rubia; called madder in English), which is used to make red dye. This name was borne by the central character in the French film Les Enfants du Paradis (1945).
Gardenia f English (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
Gentian m Albanian
From the name of the flowering plant called the gentian, the roots of which are used to create a tonic. It is derived from the name of the Illyrian king Gentius, who supposedly discovered its medicinal properties.
Ghoncheh f Persian
Means "flower bud" in Persian.
Gol f Persian
Means "flower, rose" in Persian.
Golbahar f Persian
Means "spring flower", from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and بهار (bahar) meaning "spring".
Golnar f Persian
Means "pomegranate flower", derived from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower" and نار (nar) meaning "pomegranate".
Golnaz f Persian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and ناز (naz) meaning "delight, comfort".
Gonca f Turkish
Means "flower bud" in Turkish, of Persian origin.
Gonxhe f Albanian
Means "flower bud" in Albanian, of Persian origin. This was the middle name of Saint Teresa of Calcutta, better known as Mother Teresa (1910-1997).
Guiying m & f Chinese
From Chinese (guì) meaning "laurel, cassia, cinnamon" combined with (yīng) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". This name can be formed from other character combinations as well.
Gul m & f Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
Gulmira f Kyrgyz, Kazakh
From Kyrgyz and Kazakh гүл (gul) meaning "flower", ultimately from Persian گل (gol), combined with Arabic أميرة (amira) meaning "princess".
Gülnur f Turkish
Means "rose light" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Gwydion m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Probably means "born of trees" from Old Welsh guid "trees" and the suffix gen "born of". In the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Gwydion is the nephew of King Math of Gwynedd, and like him a powerful magician. In an elaborate plot to give his brother a chance to rape his uncle's footbearer, he arranged a war between Gwynedd and the neighbouring kingdom of Dyfed. Gwydion himself killed King Pryderi of Dyfed at the end of the war. In punishment for the rape, Math transformed Gwydion and his brother into different animals over the course of three years. Gwydion was the uncle of Lleu Llaw Gyffes, whom he fostered. Math and Gwydion fashioned Lleu a wife, Blodeuwedd, out of flowers and they later aided him after her betrayal. Gwydion also appears in older Welsh poetry such as the Book of Taliesin.
Hajnalka f Hungarian
Means "morning glory (flower)" in Hungarian.
Hana 3 f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana) both meaning "flower". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
Hanae f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana), which both mean "flower", combined with (e) meaning "picture" or (e) meaning "favour, benefit". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hanako f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) meaning "flower" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
Haruka f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
Heather f English
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers, which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
Heitiare f Tahitian
From Tahitian hei "crown, garland" and tiare "flower".
Hoa f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (hoa) meaning "flower".
Honoka f Japanese
From Japanese (hono) meaning "harmony" (using an obscure nanori reading) and (ka) meaning "flower", as well as other combinations of kanji that have the same pronunciation. Very often it is written using the hiragana writing system.
Hua f & m Chinese
From Chinese (huá) meaning "splendid, illustrious, Chinese" or (huā) meaning "flower, blossom" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well.
Huệ f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (huệ) meaning "bright, intelligent" or (huệ) meaning "tuberose (flower)".
Hyacinth 2 f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see Hyacinthus).
Hyacinthus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ὑάκινθος (Hyakinthos), which was derived from the name of the hyacinth flower. In Greek legend Hyakinthos was accidentally killed by the god Apollo, who mournfully caused this flower to arise from his blood. The name was also borne by several early saints, notably a 3rd-century martyr who was killed with his brother Protus.
Ianthe f Greek Mythology
Means "violet flower", derived from Greek ἴον (ion) meaning "violet" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This was the name of an ocean nymph in Greek mythology.
Iolanthe f Various
Probably a variant of Yolanda influenced by the Greek words ἰόλη (iole) meaning "violet" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This name was (first?) used by Gilbert and Sullivan in their comic opera Iolanthe (1882).
Ione f Greek Mythology, English
From Ancient Greek ἴον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.
Iris f Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
Irit f Hebrew
Means "asphodel flower" in Hebrew.
Ivy f English
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
Jasmine f English, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers that is used for making perfumes. It is derived via Arabic from Persian یاسمین (yasamin), which is also a Persian name. In the United States this name steadily grew in popularity from the 1970s, especially among African Americans. It reached a peak in the early 1990s shortly after the release of the animated Disney movie Aladdin (1992), which featured a princess by this name.
Jessamine f English (Rare)
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see Jasmine), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
Ji-Yeong f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend" combined with (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" or (yeong) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper". Many other hanja character combinations are possible.
Jonquil f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
Kalei m & f Hawaiian
Means "the flowers" or "the child" from Hawaiian ka "the" and lei "flowers, lei, child".
Kamilla f Russian, Hungarian, Polish, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Russian and Hungarian form of Camilla, as well as a Polish and Scandinavian variant. This is also the Hungarian word for the chamomile flower (species Matricaria chamomilla).
Kanon f Japanese
From Japanese (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" and (non) meaning "sound". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
Kantuta f Indigenous American, Aymara
Means "cantua flower" in Aymara (species Cantua buxifolia).
Kapua f & m Hawaiian
Means "the flower" or "the child" from Hawaiian ka, a definite article, and pua "flower, offspring".
Karen 3 f Japanese
From Japanese (ka) meaning "flower" and (ren) meaning "lotus, water lily". Other combinations of kanji can also form this name.
Kasumi f Japanese
From Japanese (kasumi) meaning "mist". It can also come from (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" combined with (sumi) meaning "clear, pure". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Katniss f Literature
From the English word katniss, the name of a variety of edible aquatic flowering plants (genus Sagittaria). Katniss Everdeen is the protagonist of The Hunger Games series of novels by Suzanne Collins, released 2008 to 2010, about a young woman forced to participate in a violent televised battle.
Klytië f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτός (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
Kukka f Finnish
Means "flower" in Finnish.
Kusuma m & f Indonesian
Derived from Sanskrit कुसुम (kusuma) meaning "flower".
Květa f Czech
Either a short form of Květoslava or directly from Czech květ "flower, blossom".
Květoslav m Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements cvetu "flower" and slava "glory".
Laelia f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.
Lakshmi f & m Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, Hindi, Odia
Means "sign, mark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu goddess of prosperity, good luck, and beauty. She is the wife of Vishnu and her symbol is the lotus flower, with which she is often depicted.
Lavender f English (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
Lehua f & m Hawaiian
Means "ohia flower" in Hawaiian.
Lei 1 m & f Hawaiian
Means "flowers, lei, child" in Hawaiian.
Leilani f & m Hawaiian
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Leimomi f Hawaiian
Means "pearl lei" or "pearl child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and momi "pearl".
Licarayen f Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "stone flower" in Mapuche, from likan "a type of black stone" and rayen "flower". According to a Mapuche legend this was the name of a maiden who sacrificed herself in order to stop the wrath of the evil spirit of a volcano.
Lilac f English (Rare)
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
Lily f English
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
Linnaea f English (Rare)
From the word for the type of flower, also called the twinflower (see Linnéa).
Linnéa f Swedish
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.
Lore 2 f Basque
Means "flower" in Basque.
Lotus f English (Rare)
From the name of the lotus flower (species Nelumbo nucifera) or the mythological lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτός (lotos). In Greek and Roman mythology the lotus tree was said to produce a fruit causing sleepiness and forgetfulness.
Lule f Albanian
Means "flower" in Albanian.
Luljeta f Albanian
Means "flower of life" in Albanian, from lule "flower" and jetë "life".
Madara f Latvian
From the Latvian name for a type of flowering plant, known as cleavers or bedstraw in English.
Magnolia f English
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.
Malai f Thai
Means "garland of flowers" in Thai.
Marganita f Hebrew
From the name of a type of flowering plant common in Israel, called the scarlet pimpernel in English.
Margarida f Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan
Portuguese, Galician, Catalan and Occitan form of Margaret. Also in these languages, this is the common word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margarita f Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Greek, Albanian, Late Roman
Latinate form of Margaret. This is also the Spanish word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margherita f Italian
Italian form of Margaret. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margriet f Dutch
Dutch form of Margaret. This is also the Dutch word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
Marguerite f French
French form of Margaret. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
Marigold f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of Mary and the English word gold.
Maryam f Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bashkir, Tatar
Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bashkir and Tatar form of Miryam (see Mary). In Iran it is also the name of a flower, the tuberose, which is named after the Virgin Mary.
May f English
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of Mary, Margaret or Mabel.
Mbalenhle f Southern African, Zulu
From Zulu imbali "flower" and hle "beautiful".
Mbali f Southern African, Zulu
Means "flower" in Zulu.
Melantha f English (Rare)
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as Melanie or Melissa) with the suffix antha (from Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). John Dryden used this name in his play Marriage a la Mode (1672).
Melanthios m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μέλας (melas) meaning "black, dark" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of an insolent goatherd killed by Odysseus.
Melati f Indonesian, Malay
Means "jasmine flower" in Malay and Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit मालती (malati).
Millaray f Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "golden flower" in Mapuche, from milla "gold" and rayen "flower".
Momoka f Japanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ka) meaning "flower" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Mönkhtsetseg f Mongolian
Means "eternal flower" in Mongolian.
Mwenya f & m Southern African, Chewa
From the Chewa word for a type of flowering tree (species Breonadia salicina).
Myrtle f English
Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μύρτος (myrtos). It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
Narantsetseg f Mongolian
Means "sun flower" in Mongolian.
Narcís m Catalan
Catalan form of Narcissus. This is also the Catalan word for the narcissus flower.
Narciso m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Narcissus. This is also the word for the narcissus flower in those languages.
Narcisse m & f French
French masculine and feminine form of Narcissus. This is also the French word for the narcissus flower.
Narcissus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman, Biblical
Latinized form of Greek Νάρκισσος (Narkissos), possibly derived from νάρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness". Narkissos was a beautiful youth in Greek mythology who stared at his own reflection for so long that he eventually died and was turned into the narcissus flower.... [more]
Narcyz m Polish
Polish form of Narcissus. This is also the Polish word for the narcissus flower.
Narges f Persian
Means "daffodil, narcissus flower" in Persian, ultimately derived from Greek (see Narcissus).
Nawra f Arabic
Means "flower, blossom" in Arabic.
Nazgul f Kyrgyz, Kazakh
Derived from Persian ناز (naz) meaning "delight, comfort" and گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose".
Nergis f Turkish
Means "daffodil, narcissus flower" in Turkish, ultimately derived from Greek (see Narcissus).
Nicte f Indigenous American, Mayan (Hispanicized)
From Yucatec Maya nikte' meaning "flower" or specifically "plumeria flower". It is derived from Classic Maya nich "flower" and te' "tree".
Nitzan m & f Hebrew
Means "flower bud" in Hebrew.
Niviarsiaq f Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "young girl" in Greenlandic. This is the name of a variety of flower that grows on Greenland, the dwarf fireweed (species Chamaenerion latifolium).
Nurgül f Turkish
Means "radiant rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose".
Nurit f Hebrew
Means "buttercup flower" in Hebrew (genus Ranunculus).
Nydia f English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel The Last Days of Pompeii (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
Odtsetseg f Mongolian
Means "star flower" in Mongolian.
Õie f Estonian
Derived from Estonian õis meaning "flower".
Ornella f Italian
Created by the Italian author Gabriele d'Annunzio for his novel La Figlia di Jorio (1904). It is derived from Tuscan Italian ornello meaning "flowering ash tree".
Orvokki f Finnish
Means "pansy flower" in Finnish.
Pa f Hmong
Means "flower" in Hmong.
Palesa f Southern African, Sotho
Means "flower" in Sotho.
Pankaja m Hinduism
Means "born of mud", referring to the lotus flower, derived from Sanskrit पङ्क (panka) meaning "mud" and (ja) meaning "born". This is another name of the Hindu god Brahma.
Pansy f English
From the English word for a type of flower, ultimately deriving from Old French pensee "thought".
Patigül f Uyghur
Uyghur elaboration of Patime using the suffix گۇل (gul) meaning "flower, rose" (of Persian origin).
Peony f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower. It was originally believed to have healing qualities, so it was named after the Greek medical god Pæon.
Petal f English (Rare)
From the English word for the flower part, derived from Greek πέταλον (petalon) meaning "leaf".
Petunia f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, derived ultimately from a Tupi (South American) word.
Phuong f & m Khmer
Means "garland, bouquet (of flowers)" in Khmer.
Poppy f English (British)
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
Posy f English
Diminutive of Josephine. It can also be inspired by the English word posy for a bunch of flowers.
Primrose f English (Rare)
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
Primula f English (Rare)
From the name of a genus of several species of flowers, including the primrose. It is derived from the Latin word primulus meaning "very first".
Prunella f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, also called self-heal, ultimately a derivative of the Latin word pruna "plum".
Pua f & m Hawaiian
Means "flower, offspring" in Hawaiian.
Pualani f Hawaiian
Means "heavenly flower" or "royal offspring" from Hawaiian pua "flower, offspring" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Puanani f Hawaiian
Means "beautiful flower" or "beautiful offspring" from Hawaiian pua "flower, offspring" and nani "beauty, glory".
Pushpa f & m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Means "flower" in Sanskrit. This is a trascription of both the feminine form पुष्पा and the masculine form पुष्प. Especially in Nepal it is frequently masculine.
Quỳnh f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (quỳnh) meaning "deep red". This is also the Vietnamese name for a variety of flowering plant (genus Epiphyllum).
Ralitsa f Bulgarian
Means "larkspur (flower)" in Bulgarian.
Ratree f Thai
From the name of a variety of jasmine flower, the night jasmine, ultimately from a poetic word meaning "night".
Reyhangül f Uyghur
Uyghur elaboration of Reyhan using the suffix گۇل (gul) meaning "flower, rose".
Rose f English, French
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Ruzha f Bulgarian, Macedonian
Means "hollyhock" in Bulgarian (referring to flowering plants from the genera Alcea and Althaea). This is also an alternate transcription of Macedonian Ружа (see Ruža).
Sacnicte f Indigenous American, Mayan (Hispanicized)
Means "white plumeria flower", from Yucatec Maya sak "white" and nikte' "plumeria flower".
Saffron f English (Rare)
From the English word that refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
Samantha f English, Italian, Dutch
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of Samuel, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show Bewitched.
Scilla f Italian
Short form of Priscilla. This is also the Italian word for the squill flower (genus Scilla).
Sethunya f Southern African, Tswana
Means "bloom, flower" in Tswana, derived from thunya "to bloom".
Sharon f English
From an Old Testament place name, in Hebrew שָׁרוֹן (Sharon), which means "plain", referring to the fertile plain near the coast of Israel. This is also the name of a type of flowering shrub, the rose of Sharon. It has been in use as a given name since the 1920s, possibly inspired by the heroine in the serial novel The Skyrocket (1925) by Adela Rogers St. Johns.
Sigal f Hebrew
Means "violet flower" in Hebrew.
Smiltė f Lithuanian
Means "sandwort" in Lithuanian, referring to flowering plants from the genus Arenaria.
Sóley f Icelandic
Means "buttercup flower" in Icelandic (genus Ranunculus), derived from sól "sun" and ey "island".
Sólja f Faroese
Means "buttercup flower" in Faroese (genus Ranunculus). The buttercup is the national flower of the Faroe Islands.
Spomenka f Croatian
From Croatian spomenak meaning "forget-me-not flower".
Sumire f Japanese
From Japanese (sumire) meaning "violet (flower)". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Tajeddigt f Northern African, Berber
Means "flower" in Tamazight.
Tansy f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
Tiare f Tahitian
Means "flower" in Tahitian, also specifically referring to the species Gardenia taitensis.
Topʉsana f Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "prairie flower" in Comanche.
Tsetseg f Mongolian
Means "flower" in Mongolian.
Tsisana f Georgian
Probably derived from Georgian ცის (tsis) meaning "of the sky", the genitive case of ცა (tsa) meaning "sky, heaven". This is also an alternative Georgian word for the forget-me-not flower.
Tsubaki f Japanese
From Japanese 椿 (tsubaki) meaning "camellia flower", as well as other combinations of kanji that are pronounced the same way.
Tsvetan m Bulgarian
Derived from Bulgarian цвет (tsvet) meaning "flower, blossom".
Vaitiare f Tahitian
From Tahitian vai "water" and tiare "flower".
Violet f English
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
Viorel m Romanian
Derived from viorea, the Romanian word for the alpine squill flower (species Scilla bifolia) or the sweet violet flower (species Viola odorata). It is derived from Latin viola "violet".
Virág f Hungarian
Means "flower" in Hungarian.
Vuokko f Finnish
Means "anemone flower" in Finnish.
Xiadani f Indigenous American, Zapotec
Meaning uncertain, said to mean "the flower that arrived" in Zapotec.
Xiuying f Chinese
From Chinese (xiù) meaning "luxuriant, beautiful, elegant, outstanding" combined with (yīng) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero". Other character combinations are possible.
Xochipilli m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl, from xōchitl "flower" and pilli "noble child, prince". Xochipilli was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
Xochiquetzal f Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Derived from Nahuatl xōchitl "flower" and quetzalli "feather". This was the name of the Aztec goddess of love, flowers and the earth, the twin sister of Xochipilli.
Xochitl f Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "flower" in Nahuatll.
Yeong f & m Korean
From Sino-Korean (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero", as well as other hanja characters that are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name. This name was borne by Jang Yeong-sil (where Jang is the surname), a 15th-century Korean scientist and inventor.
Yeong-Ho m Korean
From Sino-Korean (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero", (yeong) meaning "reflect light" or (yeong) meaning "dive, swim" combined with (ho) meaning "great, numerous, vast" or (ho) meaning "bright, luminous, clear, hoary". Other hanja combinations are possible.
Yeong-Hui f Korean
From Sino-Korean (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" or (yeong) meaning "dive, swim" combined with (hui) meaning "beauty" or (hui) meaning "enjoy, play". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
Yeong-Ja f Korean
From Sino-Korean (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" and (ja) meaning "child". Other hanja character combinations can form this name as well. Feminine names ending with the character (a fashionable name suffix in Japan, read as -ko in Japanese) were popular in Korea during the period of Japanese rule (1910-1945). After liberation this name and others like it declined in popularity.
Yeong-Suk f Korean
From Sino-Korean (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero" and (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming". Other hanja character combinations are possible.
Yoloxochitl f Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Derived from Nahuatl yōllōtl "heart" and xōchitl "flower".
Yūka f Japanese
From Japanese () meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" and (ka) meaning "flower, blossom". It can also be composed of different kanji that have the same pronunciations.
Zahrah f Arabic
Derived from Arabic زهرة (zahrah) meaning "blooming flower".
Zaynab f Arabic
Meaning uncertain. It is possibly related to Arabic زين (zayn) meaning "beauty"; it could be from the name of a fragrant flowering tree; or it could be an Arabic form of Zenobia, a name borne by a pre-Islamic queen of Palmyra. Zaynab was the name of a daughter, a granddaughter, and two wives of the Prophet Muhammad.
Zinnia f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.