Names with "son" in Meaning

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keyword son.
gender
usage
meaning
Addison f & m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Adam". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
Akpan m Western African, Ibibio
Means "first-born son" in Ibibio.
Anderson m English
From a surname meaning "son of Andrew".
Anson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Agnes".
Aonghus m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Óengus, possibly meaning "one strength" from óen "one" and guss "force, strength". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was an Irish god of love and youth, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He was the son of Dagda and Boann. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king, several Irish kings, and a few saints, including a 9th-century bishop of Tallaght.
Apollonides m Ancient Greek
Means "son of Apollo" in Greek, derived from the name of the god Apollo combined with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides).
Ashurbanipal m Ancient Assyrian (Anglicized)
From Akkadian Ashur-bani-apli meaning "Ashur is creator of a son". This was the name of one of the final kings of the Assyrian Empire, reigning late in the 7th century BC. He appears in the Old Testament under the name Asnappar.
Barnabas m German (Rare), English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a Jew from Cyprus who was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys. The original Aramaic form is unattested, but it may be from בּר נביא (bar naviya') meaning "son of the prophet", though in Acts 4:36 it is claimed that the name means "son of encouragement".... [more]
Bartholomew m English, Biblical
English form of Βαρθολομαῖος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of Talmai". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
Benjamin m English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) meaning "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
Benson m English
From an English surname that originally meant "son of Benedict".
Bevan m English
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Evan meaning "son of Evan". As a given name, it is particularly common in New Zealand and Australia.
Bowen m English (Modern)
From a Welsh surname, derived from ap Owain meaning "son of Owain".
Branson m English (Modern)
From an English surname that meant "son of Brandr".
Bryson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Brice". Starting in the 1970s this name began steadily growing in popularity, likely because it features the same popular sounds found in other names such as Brice and Tyson.
Chaska m Indigenous American, Sioux
From Lakota or Dakota čhaské meaning "firstborn son".
Cody m English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of both Irish Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of the helpful one" and Mac Óda meaning "son of Odo". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
Colson m English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of Col". As a given name it entered the American top 1000 rankings in 2017, probably inspired by similar-sounding names such as Cole and Colton.
Cormac m Irish Mythology, Irish
From Old Irish Cormacc or Corbmac, of uncertain meaning, possibly from corb "chariot, wagon" or corbbad "defilement, corruption" combined with macc "son". This is the name of several characters from Irish legend, including the semi-legendary high king Cormac mac Airt who supposedly ruled in the 3rd century, during the adventures of the hero Fionn mac Cumhaill. This name was also borne by a few early saints.
Ɗanjuma m Western African, Hausa
From Hausa ɗa "son" and Jumma'a "Friday".
Ɗanladi m Western African, Hausa
From Hausa ɗa "son" and Lahadi "Sunday".
Ɗanlami m Western African, Hausa
From Hausa ɗa "son" and Alhamis "Thursday".
Dawson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of David". As a given name, it was popularized in the late 1990s by the central character on the television drama Dawson's Creek (1998-2003). In the United States the number of boys receiving the name increased tenfold between 1997 and 1999. It got another boost in 2014 after it was used for a main character in the movie The Best of Me.
Dixon m English
From an English surname meaning "Dick 1's son".
Dracula m History, Literature
Means "son of Dracul" in Romanian, with Dracul being derived from Romanian drac "dragon". It was a nickname of the 15th-century Wallachian prince Vlad III, called the Impaler, whose father was Vlad II Dracul. However, the name Dracula is now most known from the 1897 novel of the same name by Bram Stoker, which features the Transylvanian vampire Count Dracula, who was probably inspired in part by the historical Wallachian prince.
Dumuzi m Sumerian Mythology
From Sumerian 𒌉 (dumu) meaning "son, child" and 𒍣 (zid) meaning "true, loyal". This was the name of a Sumerian god of shepherds and vegetation, the husband of Inanna. He was said to spend half of each year in the underworld, resulting in the yearly cycle of seasons. He was known to the Semitic peoples of Mesopotamia as Tammuz.
Dyson m English (Rare)
From an English surname that meant "son of Dye". As a given name it is likely inspired by similar-sounding names such as Bryson and Tyson.
Edison m English
From an English surname that meant either "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).
Emerson m & f English
From an English surname meaning "son of Emery". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
Figaro m Literature
Created by playwright Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais for the central character in his plays The Barber of Seville (1775), The Marriage of Figaro (1784) and The Guilty Mother (1792). Beaumarchais may have based the character's name on the French phrase fils Caron meaning "son of Caron", which was his own nickname and would have been pronounced in a similar way. In modern French the word figaro has acquired the meaning "barber", reflecting the character's profession.
Fitz m English (Rare)
Short form of various given names that are derived from surnames beginning with Norman French fitz meaning "son of" (for example Fitzroy).
Fitzroy m English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "son of the king" in Old French, originally given to illegitimate sons of monarchs.
Fitzwilliam m Literature
From an English surname meaning "son of William", formed using the Anglo-Norman French prefix fitz, derived from filius "son". This is the given name of Mr. Darcy, a character in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
Gilroy m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
Gorō m Japanese
From Japanese (go) meaning "five" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the fifth son. Different combinations of kanji are also possible.
Grayson m English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward". It became common towards the end of the 20th century because of its similarity to popular names like Jason, Mason and Graham.
Hachirō m Japanese
From Japanese (hachi) meaning "eight" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the eighth son. Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Håkon m Norwegian
Modern Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Hákon, which meant "high son" from "high" and konr "son, descendant". This was the name of seven kings of Norway.
Harrison m English
From an English surname that meant "son of Harry". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). As a given name it reached a low point in America in 1977 before it was revived by the career of actor Harrison Ford (1942-), who starred in such movies as Star Wars in 1977 and Indiana Jones in 1984.
Henderson m English
From a Scottish surname meaning "son of Henry".
Herakleides m Ancient Greek
Means "son of Herakles" in Greek, derived from the name of the mythic hero Herakles combined with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). This was the name of a 4th-century BC Greek astronomer who theorized the rotation of the earth.
Herleifr m Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements herr "army" and leifr "son, descendant".
Hudson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Hudde". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
Ichirō m Japanese
From Japanese (ichi) meaning "one" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name given to the first son. Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
Jackson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Jack". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
Jameson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of James".
Jamison m English
From an English surname meaning "son of James".
Jefferson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Jeffrey". It is usually given in honour of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the United States and the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.
Jensen m English (Modern)
From a Danish surname meaning "son of Jens".
Jepson m English (Rare)
From an English surname that meant "son of Jep".
Jirō m Japanese
From Japanese (ji) meaning "two" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name given to the second son. Other combinations of kanji characters can also be possible.
Jūrō m Japanese
From Japanese () meaning "ten" and () meaning "son". Traditionally this name was given to the tenth son. Other combinations of kanji characters are possible as well.
Katsurō m Japanese
From Japanese (katsu) meaning "victory" and () meaning "son". Different kanji characters can combine to form this name as well.
Kendrick m English
From a surname that has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of Henry".... [more]
Kentarō m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong", (ta) meaning "thick, big, great" and () meaning "son". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Kichirō m Japanese
From Japanese (kichi) meaning "good luck" and () meaning "son". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Kumara m Hinduism
Derived from Sanskrit कुमार (kumara) meaning "boy, son". In Hindu texts this is an epithet of both the fire god Agni and the war god Skanda.
Kurō m Japanese
From Japanese (ku) meaning "nine" and () meaning "son". This name was traditionally given to the ninth son. Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
Lawson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Laurence 1".
Mabyn f Cornish
Possibly from Old Cornish mab meaning "son". This was the name of a 6th-century Cornish saint, said to be one of the children of Brychan Brycheiniog. She is now regarded as a woman, but some early sources describe her as a man.
Macbeth m History
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic given name Mac Beatha meaning "son of life", implying holiness. This was the name of an 11th-century Scottish king. Shakespeare based his play Macbeth loosely on this king's life.
Macdara m Irish, Old Irish
Means "son of oak" in Irish. This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara.
Mack 1 m English
From a surname, originally a shortened form of various Irish and Scottish surnames beginning with Mac or Mc (from Irish mac meaning "son"). It is also used as a generic slang term for a man.
Maddox m English (Modern)
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of Madoc". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.
Madison f & m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Maud". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie Splash (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. It was ranked second for girls in the United States by 2001. This rise from obscurity to prominence in only 18 years represents an unprecedented 550,000 percent increase in usage.... [more]
Maponos m Celtic Mythology
Means "great son", from the Celtic root *makwos meaning "son" (Gaulish and Brythonic mapos) combined with the divine or augmentative suffix -on. This was the name of a god of youth worshipped in Gaul and Britain. He was commonly equated with the Greco-Roman god Apollo.
Moses m English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh), which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10).... [more]
Nabopolassar m Babylonian (Anglicized)
From the Akkadian name Nabu-apla-usur meaning "Nabu protect my son", derived from the god's name Nabu combined with aplu meaning "son, heir" and an imperative form of naṣāru meaning "to protect". This was the name of a 7th-century BC king of the Babylonian Empire, the first of the Chaldean dynasty.
Nebuchadnezzar m Babylonian (Anglicized), Biblical
From נְבוּכַדְנֶאצֲּר (Nevukhadnetzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Nabu-kudurri-usur meaning "Nabu protect my eldest son", derived from the god's name Nabu combined with kudurru meaning "eldest son" and an imperative form of naṣāru meaning "to protect". This name was borne by a 12th-century BC king of the Babylonian Empire. It was also borne by a 6th-century BC king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He captured Jerusalem, and ultimately destroyed the city's temple and deported many of its citizens, as told in the Old Testament.
Neely m & f English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname, an Anglicized and reduced form of Gaelic Mac an Fhilidh (or McNeilly) meaning "son of the poet".
Nelson m English, Spanish
From an English surname meaning "son of Neil". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he destroyed a combined French and Spanish fleet, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.
Nixon m English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of Nick". It was borne by the American president Richard Nixon (1913-1994).
Parry m English (Rare)
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of Harry".
Partha m Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese
Means "son of Pritha" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is another name for the Pandavas, who were sons of Pritha (another name of Kunti) and Pandu.
Perry m English
From a surname that is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of Herry". A famous bearer of the surname was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
Price m English
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Rhys meaning "son of Rhys".
Putera m Malay
Means "son, prince" in Malay, ultimately from Sanskrit पुत्र (putra).
Putra m Indonesian
Means "son" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit पुत्र (putra).
Reuben m Biblical, Hebrew, English
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
Rokurō m Japanese
From Japanese (roku) meaning "six" and () meaning "son". This name was traditionally given to the sixth son. Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Saburō m Japanese
From Japanese (sabu) meaning "three" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the third son. Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
Salil m Arabic
Means "sword" or "son" in Arabic.
Shahzad m Persian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "prince, son of the king" in Persian.
Shapour m Persian
Means "son of the king" in Persian. This was the name of three Sassanid emperors.
Sherzod m Uzbek, Tajik
Means "son of the lion", derived from Persian شیر (sher) meaning "lion" and the suffix زاد (zad) meaning "son of".
Shichirō m Japanese
From Japanese (shichi) meaning "seven" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name given to the seventh son. Other kanji combinations can be possible.
Shirō m Japanese
From Japanese (shi) meaning "four" and () meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the fourth son. Other kanji combinations are possible.
Siniša m Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Serbo-Croatian sin meaning "son".
Suni m Old Norse
From Old Norse sunr meaning "son".
Tama m Maori
Means "son, boy" in Maori.
Tarō m Japanese
From Japanese (ta) meaning "thick, big, great" and () meaning "son". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Tavish m Scottish
Anglicized form of a Thàmhais, vocative case of Tàmhas. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname McTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Tàmhas".
Tennyson m English (Rare)
From an English surname that meant "son of Tenney", Tenney being a medieval form of Denis. A notable bearer of the surname was the British poet Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892), commonly called Lord Tennyson after he became a baron in 1884.
Tiglath-Pileser m Ancient Assyrian (Anglicized), Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From תִּגְלַת פִּלְאֶסֶר (Tiglat Pil'eser), the Hebrew form of Akkadian Tukulti-apil-esharra meaning "my trust is in the son of Esharra", Esharra being the main temple dedicated to the god Ashur in the city of Ashur. This was the name of three kings of Assyria, including the conqueror Tiglath-Pileser III (8th century BC), who is mentioned in the Old Testament.
Vazha m Georgian
Derived from Georgian ვაჟი (vazhi) meaning "son".
Watson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Wat". A famous fictional bearer of the surname was Dr. Watson, the assistant to Sherlock Holmes in Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
Wilson m English, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese
From an English surname meaning "son of William". The surname was borne by Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), the American president during World War I.
Ximeno m Medieval Spanish
Medieval Spanish or Basque name of uncertain meaning. It is possibly a form of Simon 1, though it may in fact derive from Basque seme meaning "son".
Xwm m Hmong
Means "second son" in Hmong.
Yancy m & f English
From a surname, which was an Americanized form of the Dutch surname Jansen meaning "Jan 1's son".
Yoshirō m Japanese
From Japanese (yoshi) meaning "righteous" and () meaning "son". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Zétény m Hungarian
Possibly from the old Slavic root zeti meaning "son-in-law".