Names Categorized "moon"

This is a list of names in which the categories include moon.
gender
usage
Ahmose m & f Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
From Egyptian jꜥḥ-ms meaning "born of Iah", derived from the name of the Egyptian god Iah combined with msj meaning "be born". This was the name of the first pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (16th century BC). He defeated the Hyksos and drove them from Egypt. It was also borne by others among Egyptian royalty from the same era, including several queens consort.
Aibek m Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Derived from Kazakh and Kyrgyz ай (ay) meaning "moon" combined with the Turkic military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
Aidana f Kazakh
Means "wise moon" in Kazakh, from ай (ay) meaning "moon" and дана (dana) meaning "wise".
Aiday f Kazakh
Means "moon-like" in Kazakh, from ай (ay) meaning "moon" and the suffix дай (day) meaning "like".
Aigerim f Kazakh
Means "wonderful moon", from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" and керім (kerim) meaning "wonderful".
Aigul f Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Kazakh and Kyrgyz form of Aygül.
Aikorkem f Kazakh
Means "elegant moon", derived from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" and көркем (korkem) meaning "elegant, graceful, refined, artistic".
Ailin f Kazakh
Kazakh form of Aylin.
Aiman 1 f Kazakh
Means "beauty of the moon" in Kazakh.
Ainur f Kazakh
Kazakh form of Aynur.
Aisultan m Kazakh
Derived from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" and сұлтан (sultan) meaning "sultan, king" (of Arabic origin).
Aizere f Kazakh
Means "golden moon" from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" and Persian زر (zar) meaning "gold".
Ajla f Bosnian, Albanian
Bosnian and Albanian form of Ayla 2.
Alcmene f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ἀλκμήνη (Alkmene), derived from ἀλκή (alke) meaning "strength, prowess" combined with μήνη (mene) meaning "moon" or μῆνις (menis) meaning "wrath". In Greek mythology Alcmene was the wife of Amphitryon. She was the mother of Herakles by Zeus, who bedded her by disguising himself as her absent husband.
Alkmini f Greek
Modern Greek form of Alcmene.
Arianrhod f Welsh Mythology
Probably means "silver wheel" from Welsh arian "silver" and rhod "wheel". According to the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Arianrhod was the mother of the twins Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes, whom she spontaneously birthed when she stepped over a magical wand. It is speculated that in earlier myths she may have been a goddess of the moon.
Artemis f Greek Mythology, Greek
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek ἀρτεμής (artemes) meaning "safe" or ἄρταμος (artamos) meaning "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
Awilix f Mayan Mythology
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a place name Awilizapan, or possibly from a Q'eqchi' Maya word meaning "swallow (bird)". This was the name of the K'iche' Maya goddess of the moon, night and death.
Aybek m Kyrgyz, Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kyrgyz/Kazakh Айбек (see Aibek).
Ayberk m Turkish
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and berk meaning "mighty, firm".
Ayda f Arabic, Persian, Turkish
Means "returning, visitor" in Arabic. In Turkey this is also associated with ay meaning "moon".
Aydan 1 f Turkish
Means "from the moon" in Turkish.
Aydana f Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kazakh Айдана (see Aidana).
Aygerim f Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kazakh Әйгерім (see Aigerim).
Aygül f Turkish, Uyghur, Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic element ay meaning "moon" combined with Persian گل (gol) meaning "flower, rose". In some languages this is also a name for a variety of flowering plant that grows in central Asia (species Fritillaria eduardii).
Aygün f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic elements ay "moon" and gün "sun".
Ayhan m & f Turkish
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and han meaning "khan, ruler, leader".
Aykorkem f Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kazakh Айкөркем (see Aikorkem).
Ayla 2 f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.
Aylin f Turkish, Azerbaijani, Kazakh
Means "of the moon" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon".
Aýnabat f Turkmen
Derived from Turkmen "moon" and nabat "sweet, candy".
Aynur f Turkish, Azerbaijani, Uyghur
Means "moonlight" in Turkish, Azerbaijani and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning "moon" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
Aysel f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon flood" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon" and sel "flood, stream".
Aysima f Turkish
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and sima meaning "face" (of Persian origin).
Aysu f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Derived from Turkish and Azerbaijani ay meaning "moon" and su meaning "water".
Aysun f Turkish
Means "as beautiful as the moon" in Turkish.
Ayten f Turkish
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and ten meaning "skin" (of Persian origin).
Ayym f Kazakh
Means "my moon" in Kazakh, derived from ай (ay) meaning "moon" and the possessive suffix ым (ym) meaning "my".
Ayzere f Kazakh
Alternate transcription of Kazakh Айзере (see Aizere).
Badr m & f Arabic
Means "full moon" in Arabic.
Belinay f Turkish (Modern)
Means "reflection of the moon on a lake" in Turkish.
Belphoebe f Literature
Combination of Old French bele "beautiful" and the name Phoebe. This name was first used by Edmund Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Bulan f Indonesian
Means "moon" (or "month") in Indonesian.
Buzz m English
From a nickname derived from the onomatopoeic word buzz meaning "buzz, hum, murmur". A notable bearer is American astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin (1930-), one of the first people to walk on the moon. The character Buzz Lightyear from the movie Toy Story (1995) was named after Aldrin.
Chan m & f Khmer
Means "moon" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra).
Chander m Indian, Hindi
Alternate transcription of Hindi चन्द्र or चन्द्रा (see Chandra).
Chandra m & f Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts, which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
Chandrakant m Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
Chandrakanta f Indian, Hindi
Feminine form of Chandrakant.
Chandrashekhar m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Odia
Means "crown of the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and शेखर (shekhara) meaning "crest, peak, crown". This is an epithet of the Hindu god Shiva.
Channary f Khmer
Means "moon-faced girl" from Khmer ចន្ទ (chan) meaning "moon" and នារី (neari) meaning "woman, girl".
Chantrea f & m Khmer
Means "moonlight" in Khmer.
Cynthia f English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθία (Kynthia), which means "woman from Cynthus". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Cynthus was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century. It reached a peak of popularity in the United States in 1957 and has declined steadily since then.
Dawa m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "moon, month" in Tibetan.
Diana f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Armenian, Georgian, Roman Mythology
Means "divine, goddesslike", a derivative of Latin dia or diva meaning "goddess". It is ultimately related to the same Indo-European root *dyew- found in Zeus. Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
Dilay f Turkish
Means "beautiful moon" in Turkish.
Elaina f English
Variant of Elaine.
Elaine f English, Arthurian Romance
From an Old French form of Helen. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation Le Morte d'Arthur Elaine was the daughter of Pelles, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the publication of Alfred Tennyson's Arthurian epic Idylls of the King (1859).
Elena f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Czech, Lithuanian, Estonian, Finnish, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Form of Helen used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see Yelena).
Feray f Turkish
Means "radiance of the moon" in Turkish.
Gülay f Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "rose moon" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, derived from gül, ultimately Persian گل (gol), meaning "rose" combined with ay meaning "moon".
Günay f & m Turkish, Azerbaijani
Derived from the Turkic elements gün "sun" and ay "moon".
Hala f Arabic
Means "halo around the moon" in Arabic. This was the name of a sister-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad.
Helen f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek Ἑλένη (Helene), probably from Greek ἑλένη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σελήνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
Hellen f English
Variant of Helen.
Hilal m & f Arabic, Turkish
Means "crescent moon" in Arabic, also referring to the new moon on the Islamic calendar. As a given name it is typically masculine in Arabic and feminine in Turkish.
Hodesh f Biblical
Means "new moon, month" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this is the wife of Shaharaim.
Iah m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian jꜥḥ meaning "moon". In Egyptian mythology this was the name of a god of the moon, later identified with Thoth.
Ilargi f Basque
Means "moon" in Basque, a compound of hil "month" and argi "light".
Indu f Indian, Hindi
Means "bright drop" in Sanskrit. This is a name for the moon.
Indumathi f Tamil
From Sanskrit इन्दुमत् (indumat) meaning "full moon".
Itzel f Indigenous American, Mayan
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Classic Maya itz meaning "resin, nectar, dew, liquid, enchanted". Otherwise, it might be a variant of Ixchel.
Ixchel f Mayan Mythology, Indigenous American, Mayan
Possibly means "rainbow lady", from Classic Maya ix "lady" and chel "rainbow". Ixchel was a Maya goddess associated with the earth, jaguars, medicine and childbirth. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.
Jaci 2 f & m Indigenous American, Tupi
From Tupi îasy meaning "moon".
Jacira f Indigenous American, Tupi
Means "honey moon" in Tupi, from îasy "moon" and yra "honey".
Jericho m English (Modern)
From the name of a city in Israel that is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".
Jyotsna f Indian, Hindi
Means "moonlight" in Sanskrit.
Kamaria f Eastern African, Comorian
From Arabic qamar meaning "moon", also the root of the name of the island country of the Comoros.
Khonsu m Egyptian Mythology
From Egyptian ḫnsw meaning "traveller", derived from ḫns meaning "to traverse, to cross". In Egyptian mythology he was a god of the moon, the son of Amon and Mut.
Killa f Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "moon" in Quechua.
Koray m Turkish
Means "ember moon" in Turkish.
Lebanah m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "white" in Hebrew, a poetic name for the moon. This name appears briefly in the Old Testament.
Lúa f Galician
Galician form of Luna.
Lucine f Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Լուսինե (see Lusine).
Lucineh f Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Լուսինե (see Lusine).
Luna f Roman Mythology, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English
Means "the moon" in Latin (as well as Italian, Spanish and other Romance languages). Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Lusine f Armenian
From Armenian լուսին (lusin) meaning "moon".
Lusineh f Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Լուսինե (see Lusine).
Mahin f Persian
Means "related to the moon" in Persian.
Mahine f Persian
Alternate transcription of Persian مهین (see Mahin).
Mahnaz f Persian
From Persian مه (mah) meaning "moon" and ناز (naz) meaning "delight, comfort".
Mahsa f Persian
Means "like the moon" in Persian.
Mahtab f Persian
Means "moonlight" in Persian.
Marama f & m Maori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "moon" in Maori. This is the name of a moon god (or goddess) in Maori mythology.
Menodora f Ancient Greek
Means "gift of the moon", derived from Greek μήνη (mene) meaning "moon" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who was martyred with her sisters Metrodora and Nymphodora.
Meshach m Biblical
Possibly means "who is what Aku is?" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament this is the Babylonian name of Mishael, one of the three men cast into a blazing furnace but saved from harm by God.
Metztli f & m Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "moon" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec god (or goddess) of the moon.
Minodora f Romanian
Romanian form of Menodora.
Miray f Turkish
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Arabic أمير (amir) meaning "commander" combined with Turkish ay meaning "moon, month".
Mitsuki f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". It can also come from (mitsu) meaning "light" and (ki) meaning "hope", as well as several other kanji combinations.
Monday m & f English (African)
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This can be given to children born on Monday, especially in Nigeria.
Nanna 2 m Sumerian Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Sumerian god of the moon. He was the son of Enlil and the husband of Ningal.
Natsuki f Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". Alternatively, it can come from (natsu) meaning "summer" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well.
Nguyệt f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (nguyệt) meaning "moon".
Nilay f Turkish, Azerbaijani
From Turkish and Azerbaijani Nil, the name of the Nile River, combined with ay meaning "moon".
Nima 2 m Persian
Persian name of uncertain meaning, possibly "just, fair" or "half moon".
Poornima f Tamil, Indian, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi
Alternate transcription of Tamil பூர்ணிமா, Kannada ಪೂರ್ಣಿಮಾ or Hindi/Marathi पूर्णिमा (see Purnima).
Purnima f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Tamil, Kannada
Means "full moon" in Sanskrit.
Qamar m & f Arabic
Means "moon" in Arabic.
Rakesh m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu
Means "lord of the full moon" from Sanskrit राका (raka) meaning "full moon" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler".
Ramachandra m Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil
Derived from the name of the Hindu deity Rama 1 combined with Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon". This is another name of Rama.
Rhiannon f Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from an unattested Celtic name *Rīgantonā meaning "great queen" (Celtic *rīganī "queen" and the divine or augmentative suffix -on). It is speculated that Rigantona was an old Celtic goddess, perhaps associated with fertility and horses like the Gaulish Epona. As Rhiannon, she appears in Welsh legend in the Mabinogi as a beautiful magical woman who rides a white horse. She was betrothed against her will to Gwawl, but cunningly broke off that engagement and married Pwyll instead. Their son was Pryderi.... [more]
Salena f English (Modern)
Perhaps an invented name based on similar-sounding names such as Selina.
Salina f English
Perhaps an invented name based on similar-sounding names such as Selina.
Sanda 2 f Burmese
Means "moon" in Burmese, ultimately from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra).
Sarangerel f Mongolian
Means "moonlight" in Mongolian, from саран (saran) meaning "moon" and гэрэл (gerel) meaning "light".
Sashi m & f Indian, Kannada
Alternate transcription of Kannada ಶಶಿ (see Shashi).
Selena f Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Selene. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena. Another famous bearer is the American actress and singer Selena Gomez (1992-).
Selene f Greek Mythology
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, a Titan. She was sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
Selina f English, German
Variant of Celina or Selene. As an English name, it first came into use in the 17th century.
Selini f Greek
Modern Greek transcription of Selene.
Şenay f Turkish
Means "merry moon" in Turkish.
Shadrach m Biblical
Means "command of Aku" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Old Testament Shadrach is the Babylonian name of Hananiah, one of the three men cast into a fiery furnace but saved by God.
Shashi m & f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada, Telugu
Traditional name for the moon, it literally means "having a hare" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form शशि and the feminine form शशी.
Sin m Semitic Mythology
From earlier Akkadian Su'en, of unknown meaning. This was the name of the Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian god of the moon. He was closely identified with the Sumerian god Nanna.
Tanith f Semitic Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
Taqqiq m & f Indigenous American, Inuit
Means "moon" in Inuktitut.
Tharindu m Sinhalese
Means "moon" in Sinhala.
Thoth m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian ḏḥwtj (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
Tsukiko f Japanese
From Japanese (tsuki) meaning "moon" and (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji are possible.
Tsukuyomi m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese (tsuku) meaning "moon" and (yomi) meaning "to read". In Japanese mythology Tsukuyomi was the god of the moon, the sibling of Amaterasu and Susanoo.
Tülay f Turkish
Means "tulle moon" in Turkish.
Tuncay m Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "bronze moon" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
Usagi f Popular Culture
Means "rabbit" in Japanese. This name was used on the Japanese television show Sailor Moon, which first aired in the 1990s.
Wulan f Javanese
Javanese form of Bulan.
Yin f & m Chinese
From Chinese (yín) meaning "silver, money", (yīn) meaning "sound, tone" or (yīn) meaning "shade, shelter, protect", as well as other Chinese characters pronounced similarly.