Celtic Submitted Names

These names are used by Celtic peoples.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AALISH f Manx
Manx form of ALICE.
AANOR f Breton
Variant of AZENOR. Folk etymology likes to associate this name with ELÉONORE due to confusing the variant Aenor with the possibly Germanic name AENOR borne by the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine (see ELEANOR for further information).
AAUE f Manx
Manx form of EVE via Old Irish EUA.
ABAIGEAL f Irish (Rare)
Irish form of ABIGAIL.
ABBAN m Manx
Manx form of ABBÁN.
ABERFA f Welsh
Means "from the mouth of the river" in Welsh.
ABERTHA f Welsh
Means "sacrifice" in ancient Welsh.
ABHLACH f Irish
From Old Irish ablach "having apple trees".
ABIAGEAL f Irish (Rare)
Irish form of ABIGAIL.
ADAUE m Manx
Manx form of ADAM.
ADDA m Welsh
Welsh form of ADAM.
ADENORA f Breton
Breton form of ÉLÉONORE.
ÀDHAMH m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of ADAM.
ÁDHAMHNÁN m Irish
Diminutive of ÁDHAMH.
ADRABORANN f Breton (Modern, Rare)
Feminine form of Adraboran, a Breton variant ("Bretonnisation") of the name of the star ALDEBARAN.
ADWEN f Welsh, Cornish
Welsh name, in which the second element is gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". It was borne by a Cornish saint, considered to be "the Cornish Saint DWYNWEN" as a patron of sweethearts... [more]
AE m Manx (Archaic)
Manx cognate of ÁED.
AEDAN m English, Manx
Anglicized form of ÁEDÁN as well as a Manx cognate of this name via Manx AE.
AEDD m Welsh, Irish
From the Irish aedh "fire". This name was borne by a king of Ireland.
AEDÍN f Irish (Modern, Rare)
An Irish name meaning "little flame". It is derived from the name of the Celtic sun god "AED", with "ÍN" the diminutive for "little". It is a feminine version Aidan.... [more]
AEDNAT f Irish (Modern, Rare)
Possibly related to AODH. A minor character in the Cirque du Freak franchise.
AEDUS m Irish (Latinized, Archaic)
Possibly a Latinized form of AODH.... [more]
AEL m Breton (Modern)
Directly taken from Breton ael "angel".
AELA f Breton (Modern)
Feminine form of AEL and cognate of ANGELA.
AELEZ f Breton (Rare)
Variant of AELA. The name coincides with Breton aelez "angels".
AELHAEARN m Welsh
Derived from Welsh ael meaning "(eye)brow" and haearn "iron". This was the name of a 7th-century saint.
AELHEARN m Welsh
Variant of AELHAEARN.
AELOD m Medieval English, Welsh
From Aelauð, which was a combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and Auð meaning "wealth, fortune."
AELWEN f Welsh
Derived from Welsh ael "brow" and gwen "white; fair; blessed". This name has been used from the early 20th century onwards.
AELWENN f Breton (Modern, Rare)
Combination of Breton AEL "angel" and GWENN "white, fair, blessed".
AERES f Welsh (Modern, Rare)
Allegedly directly taken from Welsh aeres "heiress". Seems restricted to the Carmarthen district, in South Wales.
AFAN m Welsh, Medieval Welsh
The name of a river in South Wales, usually Anglicized as AVON or Avan, presumably derived from Celtic *abon- "river" (making it a cognate of AFON)... [more]
AFFRICA f Manx (Archaic)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Theories include a Manx form of AFFRAIC.
AFRADAÍTÉ f Irish
Irish form of APHRODITE.
AIBHLINN f Irish
Irish form of AVELINE.
AIBHNE m & f Irish (Rare)
From Irish abhainn meaning "river".
AIBREANN f Irish (Modern, Rare)
Derived from the Irish word for April.
AIGNÉAS f Irish
Irish form of AGNES.
AILBEART m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of ALBERT.
AILEAN m Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Scottish Gaelic form of ALAN.
AILERAN m Irish
Borne by Ailerán the Wise, Irish scholar and saint.
ÁILGHEANÁN m Irish
A pet form of a personal name composed of old Celtic elements meaning "mild, noble person"
AILIDH f Irish
Diminutive of AILÍS.
AILIG m Scottish Gaelic
Gaelic form of ALEC.
AILIONÓRA f Irish (Rare), Medieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Irish form of ELEANOR (probably via Latin Alienora). This name occurs in medieval Irish annals, belonging to two Anglo-Norman noblewomen living in Ireland... [more]
AILIS f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of ALICE.
AILISH f Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of AILÍS.
AIMIL f Manx
Manx feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
AINDRIAS m Irish
Irish form of ANDREW.
AINÉISLIS m Irish (Modern, Rare), Medieval Irish
Possibly means "careful, thoughtful" from the Irish negative prefix ain- combined with éislis "negligence, remissness".
AINELAG f Manx (Modern, Rare)
Modern coinage derived from Manx ainle "angel" and the diminutive suffix -ag, this name is intended as a Manx equivalent to ANGELA.
AINMIRE m Irish
Means "great lord". A king of Tara bore this name.
AIRA f Welsh
Variant spelling of Welsh Eira
AISHLING f Irish
Variant of AISLING.
AISLÍN f Irish
Variant of AISLING.
AITHBHREAC f Scottish Gaelic, Medieval Scottish
Older form of OIGHRIG. Aithbhreac was the given name of the author of the earliest extant poetry in Scottish Gaelic by a poetess. Aithbhreac Inghean Coirceadal (1430-80) wrote a famous poem to eulogise her late husband.
ALABHAOIS m Irish
Irish form of ALOYSIUS.
ALACOQUE f Irish (Rare)
From the French surname. Its popularity as a name, especially among Catholics, is likely due to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, V.H.M., a French Roman Catholic nun and mystic, who promoted devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus in its modern form.
ALAR m Breton (Rare)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Theories include a Breton form of ALARIC and a Breton form of ÉLOI.
ALARA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of ALAR.
ALAW f Welsh
Directly taken from Welsh alaw "melody, tune; lily".
ALAWN m Welsh
Derived from Welsh alaw meaning "melody, harmony" (see ALAW). This was the name of an early bard, said to be one of the three founders of druidism.
ALBERZH m Breton (Rare)
Breton form of ALBERT.
ALER m Breton (Rare)
Variant of ALAR.
ALERA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of ALER.
ALEYN m Manx
Manx form of ALAN.
ALFOÑS m Breton
Breton form of ALFONS.
ALISTREENEY f Manx
Feminine form of ALISTER.
ALISTRINA f Manx
Manx form of ALASTRÍONA.
ALISTRYN m Manx
Variant of ALISTER.
ALLOW m Manx (Archaic)
Manx name of uncertain origin, used until the 17th century. Kneen (1937) suggests Old Norse alfr "elf"; Gill (1963) points to the Manx surname Callow, which derives from MacCalo, an Anglicized form of either of the Gaelic surnames Mac Calbach "son of Calbhach" (the Gaelic name Calbhach meaning "bold") or Mac Caolaidhe "son of Caoladhe" (the Gaelic name Caoladhe being a derivative of caol "slender, comely").
ALLY f Manx
Derived from Manx aaley "fairer" and aalin "fair, handsome, beautiful, splendid". It is also considered a cognate of AILIE.
ALMEDA f Spanish, English, Breton (Archaic)
As a Spanish given name, Almeda is a transfer of the Spanish surname which is derived from Almeida, a habitational name from Arabic al-medina "the city". Its use has been influenced by Alameda, a topographic name from Spanish alameda "poplar grove", and ultimately by the Spanish word álamo "poplar".... [more]
ALURED m Manx, English
This is a Manx name, said to be a cognate of ALFRED via its latinized form Aluredus, a variant of Alvredus.... [more]
ALWEN f Welsh
Adoption of the name of a Welsh river in Clwyd. The origin and meaning of this river's name are uncertain; current theories, however, include a derivation from Proto-Celtic *al(aun)o- "nourishing".
ALWENA f Breton
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories include an adoption of the Welsh name (which is unlikely as the Breton name seems to be older than the Welsh name in question), a younger form of Breton Alc'houen and a variant of Anglo-Norman ALFWENA.
ALYS f Welsh
Variant of ALIS
AMARGEIN m Irish (Archaic)
Meaning "born of poetry" relating to the modern Irish word amhrán meaning song. Was the name of ancient poet, Amargein Glúingel, who wrote the Song of Amargein and the foster of father of the hero Cú Chulainn, Amargein mac Eccit.
AMBRÓIS m Irish
Irish form of AMBROSE.
AMBROS m German (Rare), Cornish
German and Cornish form of AMBROSE. A known bearer of this name was the Austrian composer Ambros Rieder (1771-1855).
AMHALGHAIDH m Irish (Archaic)
Borne by an early king of Munster, and an early king of Connacht. Can be anglicized as AULEY or Awley.
AMLODD m Welsh (Rare), Welsh Mythology
Variant of AMLAWDD, derived from the Welsh intensifying prefix an-/am- and llawdd "praise". In Welsh myth he is the father of Eigyr (Igraine) and therefore the grandfather of King Arthur... [more]
AMRANWEN f Welsh (Modern, Rare)
Derived from Welsh amrant "eyelid" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". It is also the Welsh name for the medicinal herb known as German chamomile in English.
ANAËL m French (Modern), Breton (Gallicized, Modern)
Coined in the 1960s as a Breton masculine form of Anne.
ANDRAIMÉIDE f Irish
Irish form of ANDROMEDA, used in Irish translations of Greek myths.
ANDREAYS m Manx
Manx form of ANDREW.
ANDREV m Breton
Breton form of ANDRÉ.
ANDREVA f Breton, Aragonese
Breton feminine form of ANDREV and Aragonese feminine form of ANDREU.
ANDROW m English (Archaic), Cornish
Archaic English variant and Cornish form of ANDREW. This was borne by Androw Myllar (floruit 1503-1508), the first Scottish printer.
ANEIRA f Welsh
Feminine form of ANEIRIN, also considered a combination of Welsh an, an intensifying prefix, and eira "snow" (see Eira), with the intended meaning of "much snow" or "very snowy"... [more]
ANEST f Welsh
Welsh form of AGNES.
ANESTA f Welsh
Variant of ANEST.
ANGHUS m Manx
Manx form of AONGHUS.
ANLON m Irish (Rare)
Means "great champion" in Irish Gaelic.
ANLUAN m Irish
From the intensive prefix an and luan "warrior"
ANNEST f Welsh
Variant of ANEST.
ANNESTA f Welsh
Variant of ANNEST.
ANNETH f Cornish (?)
From the Cornish word annedh "home". A fictional bearer is Anneth Sizemore in Silas House's 2001 novel 'Clay's Quilt'.
ANNIG f Breton
Original Breton form of ANNICK.
ANNIK f Cornish, French
Cornish cognate and Gallicized form of ANNIG.
ANNSTÁS f Irish
Irish form of ANASTASIA.
ANTAINE m Irish
Possibly meaning ''flower'' and deriving from the Greek Anthos
ANTHOIN m Manx (Rare)
Manx form of ANTHONY.
ANWYLYD f Welsh (Archaic)
Directly taken from Welsh anwylyd "beloved; dear".
AODÁN m Irish
Younger form of ÁEDÁN.
AODHAMAIR f Irish
Feminine diminutive of AODH.
AODHÀN m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of AODHÁN.
AODHFIN m Irish (Rare)
Compound name composed of AODH "fire" and FIONN "white".
AODHNAIT f Irish (Archaic), Medieval Irish
Feminine diminuitive of AODH. This was "the name of an Irish saint whose feast was kept on 9 November".
AODREN m Breton
Derived from Old Breton alt "high; elevated" and either Old Breton roen "royal" or Old Breton roen / roin "lineage of a king". In recent times, folk etymology likes to associate this name with Modern Breton aod "coast, shore, waterside".
AODRENA f Breton
Feminine form of AODREN.
AODRENELL f Breton
Variant of AODRENA.
AOGUST m Breton (Archaic)
Breton form of AUGUST.
AOIBH f Irish (Rare)
Aoibh - an old Irish girls name of Celtic origin meaning “Beautiful” “radiant” “Pleasant”
AOILEANN f Irish
From Irish faoileann meaning "fair maiden" or "seagull".
AOINE f Irish (Modern)
From Irish aoine meaning "Friday", derived from Latin ieiunum. Aoine has only been used as a given name in Ireland in recent times.
AOISE f Irish (Rare)
Irish names
AOLÚ m Irish (Rare)
A combination honoring Irish deities Aodh and Lugh. Aodh is often referred to as a "god of the underworld," although this is likely influenced by Christian interpretation. He and his siblings were turned into swans by their stepmother, Aoife... [more]
AOUREGAN f Breton
Breton name, in which the first element is aour meaning "gold" (ultimately from Latin aurum). The second element may be Breton gen "cheek, face" or gwenn "shining, holy"... [more]
AOURELL f Breton
Derived from Breton aour "gold", this name is generally considered the Breton form of AURELIA.
AOURGEN f Breton (Rare)
Derived from Breton aour "gold" and Old Breton ken "fair; beautiful; splendid" (kaer and koant in Modern Breton), this name is the Breton cognate of Welsh EURGAIN.
ARFON m Welsh
From an ancient name for the region of North West Gwynedd, derived from Welsh ar "opposite" and Môn "Anglesey". This has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
ARGANTAEL f Medieval Breton, Breton (Rare)
Derived from Old Breton argant "silver" (arc'hant in Modern Breton), and by extension "bright; shining; resplendent", and Old Breton hael "generous; prince". Argantael was the wife of NEVENOE, the first Duke of Brittany.
ARIANA f Welsh (Modern)
Variant of ARIANRHOD, influenced by ARIANA
ARIANA f Welsh
Elaboration of the word Arian meaning Silver
ARIANELL f Welsh
Derived from Welsh arian "silver" and Middle Welsh gell "yellow" (which apparently also carried the connotations of "shining", ultimately going back to Proto-Celtic *gelwo- "yellow; white", compare Old Irish gel(o) white; fair; shining").... [more]
ARIANWEN f Medieval Welsh, Welsh
Derived from Welsh arian "silver" and gwen "white; fair; blessed". According to legend, Arianwen verch Brychan was the daughter of BRYCHAN Brycheiniog and later went on to become a saint herself.
ARIANWYN f Welsh
It means 'woman of silver'
ARMAEL m Breton
Variant of ARMEL.
ARMELA f Breton
Feminine form of ARMEL.
ARMELINE f Breton (Gallicized), French
Semi-Gallicized variant of ARMELA and French feminine form of ARMEL.
ARNALL m Welsh
Variant of ARNOLD.
ARTAGAN m Scottish Gaelic
A diminutive of the Gaelic name ARTAIR, which is thought to mean "bear" or "stone". Also refers to the ancient Celtic word "art" which has three meanings: "a stone", "God" and "noble".
ARTAIMÍS f Irish
Irish form of ARTEMIS, used in Irish translations of Greek myths.
ARTÁN m Scottish Gaelic
From ART and a diminutive suffix
ARTGHAL m Irish
Variant of ARDGHAL
ARTHEK m Cornish
Derived from Cornish arth "bear" (ultimately from Proto-Celtic *arto- "bear").
ARTHYEN m Cornish
Cornish form of ARTHEN.
ARVIL m Welsh
Variant of ARVEL, possibly meaning "wept over".
ARWEN f Welsh
Feminine form of ARWYN. Its adoption in the late 19th century may have been influenced by the ancient Welsh name ARIANWEN.
ARWENNA f Welsh
Variant of ARWEN.
ARZEL m Breton
Variant of ARZHEL.
ARZELA f Breton
Feminine form of ARZEL.
ARZHELA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of ARZHEL.
ARZHELENN f Breton
Variant of ARZHELA.
ARZHULA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of ARZHUL.
ARZHULENN f Breton
Variant of ARZHULA.
ARZHULIG m Breton
Diminutive of ARZHUL
ARZHUR m Breton
Breton form of ARTHUR.
ARZHURA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of ARZHUR.
ARZHURENN f Breton
Variant of ARZHURA.
ARZHURIG m Breton
Diminutive of ARZHUR
ARZHVAEL m Breton
Variant of ARZHEL.
ASCADH m Irish
From a diminutive of an Old Norse name, possibly Ascall or ÁSKETILL
ASKELL m Manx
Manx form of ÁSKETILL and cognate of ÁSKELL.
ASLAC m Manx (Archaic)
Manx form of ASLAK.
ASMUND m Manx
Manx form of ÁSMUNDR.
ASWEN f Cornish
Variant of ADHWYNN.
ATTRACTA f Irish, Medieval Irish (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Gaelic name Athracht, which is of uncertain meaning. The Latinization was perhaps influenced by attractus "attracted". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint who was known as a healer and miracle worker.
AUDIE m Irish, English
Anglicized diminutive of Éadbhard.
AUDREN m & f Breton Legend, Medieval Breton, Breton (Modern)
Medieval Breton form of AODREN which was revived in the 1970s. While this name was strictly masculine in medieval times, in modern times it is used on men and women alike.... [more]
AUDRENA f Breton (Rare)
Strictly feminine form of AUDREN.
AUFRICA f Manx
Manx form of AIFRIC.
AULEY m Manx
Manx form of ÁLEIFR via Old Irish AMLAÍB. This name used to be Anglicized as the etymologically unrelated HUMPHREY.
AURNIA f Irish (Latinized)
Latinization of Orflath (see ÓRLAITH). A daughter of the 12th-century Irish chieftain Donal Og MacCarthy bore this name.
AUSTEYN m Manx
Manx form of AUGUSTINE (1).
AUSTOL m Cornish
Meaning unknown. It is the name of a 6th century Cornish Saint.
AVEL m Breton
Breton form of ABEL. In recent times, folk etymology likes to connect this name to Breton avel "wind".
AVELA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of AVEL.
AVEN f Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicization of AOIBHEANN.
AVÉNIE f Breton (Gallicized, Rare), French (Rare)
French variant of AWEN. Saint Avénie was a sister of the 9th-century Achaean saint Benoît of Massérac.
AVERICK f Manx
Manx form of AIFRIC, from Gaelic aith-bhric or ath-breac meaning "somewhat dappled, speckled". According to 'An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language' (1896) by Alexander MacBain, the old Gaelic feminine name Affric belonged to a water nymph in local folklore who gave her name to the river Affric (which itself gave its name to the Scottish glen and loch Affric).
AVERICKE f Manx (Archaic)
Variant of AVERICK, mainly found in the 1600s.
AWEL f Welsh
Directly taken from Welsh awel "breeze; wind".
AWEN f Breton, Welsh
Directly taken from Welsh and Breton awen "muse; (poetic) inspiration; poetic gift", ulitmately from the Indo-European root *-uel "to blow (wind)". As a given name it has been used since the 19th century.
AWENA f Breton
Variant of AWEN.
AWENA f Welsh
Means "muse" in Welsh
AYLISH f Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of AILÍS.
AZA m Breton
Breton form of ADAM.
AZÉNOR f Breton
Gallicized spelling of AZENOR.
AZENOR f Breton, Breton Legend, Theatre
Breton name of uncertain origin and meaning.... [more]
AZILIZ f Breton
Breton form of CECILIA.
BADB f Irish Mythology, Irish
Means "crow, demon" in early Irish (and may have originally denoted "battle" or "strife"). In Irish myth the Badb was a war goddess who took the form of a crow. She and her sisters, the Morrígan and MACHA, were a trinity of war goddesses known collectively as the Morrígna.
BAGLEN m Welsh
From St. Baglen.
BAHEE f Manx
Of very uncertain origin and meaning. Folk etymology, however, seems to connect this name to both MARGARET and BIDDY.
BÁINE f & m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
An Irish name meaning "whiteness, pallor". In Irish Mythology, Báine was a princess, daughter of Tuathal Techtmar, ancestor of the kings of Ireland. "Cailín na Gruaige Báine" and "Bruach na Carraige Báine" are the names of two traditional Irish songs.... [more]
BAOIGHEALL m Irish
The meaning of this name is uncertain, but it is thought to be connected to Irish geall meaning "pledge"
BAOTH m Irish
Perhaps related to BEATHAN. It coincides with a Gaelic word meaning "vain, reckless, wanton, foolish". Other forms are Baothan, Baoithin/Beheen and Baolach... [more]
BAOTHGHALACH m Irish
Means "foolishly valorous", from the roots baoth "foolish, vain" and galach "valorous".
BARABALL f Scottish Gaelic
Variant of BARABAL. This name used to be Anglicized as the etymologically unrelated ANNABELLA.
BARBA f Breton, Corsican, Latvian, Estonian (Archaic)
Breton, Corsican, Latvian and Estonian cognate of BARBARA (compare French BARBE).
BARBARY f Manx, Medieval English, English (Archaic)
English vernacular form and Manx regular form of BARBARA.
BARBREY f Manx
Manx form of BARBARA.
BARRI m Welsh
Means "summit" in Welsh.
BARRIAGHT f Manx (Rare)
Derived from Manx barriaght "victory, conquest, win" and intended as a Manx form of VICTORIA.
BARUC m Welsh
Baruc was a 6th century Welsh saint.... [more]
BEAIRTLE m Irish
Irish form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BEARGH m Irish
Byname meaning 'plunderer.'
BEARNÁRD m Irish
Irish form of Bernard.
BEARNARD m Scottish Gaelic, Manx
Scottish Gaelic and Manx form of BERNARD.
BEARNAS f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of BERENICE, this name is also considered a feminine form of BEARNARD.
BEASAG f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of BESSIE.
BEASAIDH f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of BESSIE.
BEATRIS f Russian (Rare), Medieval Occitan, Medieval Spanish, Medieval Flemish, Czech (Rare), Breton
Russian, Breton, medieval Spanish and medieval Occitan form of BEATRIX as well as a Czech variant of that name.
BECA f Welsh
Short form of REBECCA.
BEDELLA f Irish, English
Meaning unknown. Possibly a variant of BEDELIA, influenced by DELLA or BELLA.
BEDO m Welsh
Diminutive of MAREDUDD.
BEGW f Welsh
Diminutive of MARGED.
BEHAN m Irish
name and surname of irish origin that derives from "bee" but means "child".
BEINIDICT m Irish
Irish form of BENEDICT.
BEITIRIS f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of BEATRICE.
BENEAD m Breton
Breton form of French BENOÎT.
BENED m Welsh
Welsh form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDIG m Breton (Rare)
Breton form of BENEDICT.
BENNATH f Cornish (Rare)
Directly taken from Cornish bennath "blessing".
BENNIGA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of BENNIGED.
BENNIGAN m Breton
Diminutive of BENNIGED.
BENVON f Medieval Irish (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized, Archaic)
Anglicization of Bean Mhumhan, an Irish name allegedly meaning "Lady of Munster".
BENVY f Medieval Irish (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized, Archaic)
Anglicization of Bean Mhidhe, an Irish name allegedly meaning "Lady of Meath".
BERCHAN m Irish, Filipino
A well-known saint of the early Irish church was named Berchan the Prophet of Clonsast in King's Co., but often called Brachan by Metathesis. Often used as a surname.
BERC'HED f Breton
Breton form of BRIDGET.
BERIAN m Welsh
From the place name in Pembrokeshire.
BERLEWEN f Cornish (Modern, Rare)
Derived from Cornish Borlowen "morning star, Venus".
BERNEZ m Breton (Rare)
Breton form of BERNARD.
BESSEE f Manx
Manx form of BESSIE and BETTY.
BETI f Welsh
Welsh adoption of BETTY.
BETSAN f Welsh
Welsh diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BHIOCTORIA f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of VICTORIA.
BINA f Breton, Slovene
Short form of ALBINA.
BINENN f Breton
Short form of ALBINENN.
BINIG m Breton
Diminutive of ALBIN via the diminutive Albinig.
BLAA f Manx
Derived from Manx blaa "bloom, flower" (but also "pride, heyday"), this name has been occasionally used as an equivalent of FLORA.
BLAUNSH f Manx
Manx form of BLANCHE.
BLEIDDUDD m Welsh
Derived from the Proto-Brythonic *blėð meaning “wolf” and *jʉð meaning “lord”.
BLEIZ m Breton
Derived from Breton bleiz "wolf; gray" and thus nowadays commonly considered the Breton equivalent of French LOUP, this name was in former times also used as a phonetic approximation to Blois and given in honor of the Blessed Charles of Blois, Duke of Brittany.... [more]
BLEIZA f Breton (Rare)
Feminine form of BLEIZ.
BLEIZENN f Breton
Variant of BLEIZA.