Names with Relationship "from word"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from word.
Filter Results     
more options...
AARTHI   f   Tamil
Tamil form of AARTI.
AARTI   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
From the name of a Hindu ritual in which offerings of lamps or candles are made to various gods, derived from Sanskrit आरात्रिक (aratrika).
ABHAY   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "fearless" in Sanskrit.
ABHIJIT   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
From Sanskrit अभिजित (abhijita) meaning "victorious". This is the Sanskrit name for the star Vega.
ABHILASH   m   Indian, Malayalam, Hindi
Means "desire, wish" in Sanskrit.
ABHILASHA   f   Indian, Hindi
Feminine form of ABHILASH.
ABHINAV   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Telugu
Means "young, fresh" in Sanskrit.
ABHISHEK   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Bengali, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "anointing" in Sanskrit.
ADALET   f   Turkish
Means "justice" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic.
ADILET   m & f   Kyrgyz
Means "justice" in Kyrgyz, ultimately from Arabic.
ADINA (1)   m & f   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Hebrew
From Hebrew עֲדִינָא ('adina') meaning "slender, delicate". This name is borne by a soldier in the Old Testament. It is also used in modern Hebrew as a feminine name, typically spelled עֲדִינָה.
'ADINAH   m   Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ADINA (1).
AELIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun". This was the family name of the Roman emperor Hadrian.
AETIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was probably derived from Greek αετος (aetos) "eagle". A famous bearer was the 5th-century Roman general Flavius Aetius, who defeated Attila the Hun at the Battle of Chalons.
AGAPETOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of AGAPITO.
AGAPIOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Masculine form of AGAPE. This was the name of a saint from Caesarea who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.
AGATHON   m   Ancient Greek
Greek masculine form of AGATHA.
AISHWARYA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "prosperity, wealth" in Sanskrit. A famous bearer is the Indian actress Aishwarya Rai Bachchan (1973-).
AJAY   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "unconquered", from Sanskrit (a) meaning "not" and जय (jaya) meaning "victory, conquest".
AJIT   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali
Means "unconquered, invincible", from Sanskrit (a) meaning "not" and जित (jita) meaning "conquered". This is a name of the gods Shiva and Vishnu, and of a future Buddha.
AJITH   m   Tamil, Indian, Malayalam
Southern Indian form of AJIT.
AKASH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Means "open space, sky" in Sanskrit.
AKHIL   m   Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Malayalam
Means "whole, complete" in Sanskrit.
AKHILA   f   Indian, Telugu, Malayalam
Feminine form of AKHIL.
AKSHAY   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Kannada
Means "undecaying" in Sanskrit.
ALBA (1)   f   Italian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALETHEA   f   English
Derived from Greek αληθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 17th century.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALKAIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of ALCAEUS.
ALKYONE   f   Greek Mythology
Original Greek form of ALCYONE.
ALMA (1)   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALMAS   f & m   Arabic
Means "diamond" in Arabic, ultimately from Persian.
ALMAST   f   Armenian
Means "diamond" in Armenian, ultimately from Persian.
AMALA   f   Tamil, Indian, Malayalam
Derived from Sanskrit अमल (amala) meaning "clean, pure".
AMAR (1)   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Means "immortal" in Sanskrit.
AMARANTA   f   Spanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.
AMARANTE   f   French (Rare)
French form of AMARANTHA.
AMARANTHA   f   Various
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek αμαραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Αμαραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
ÁMBAR   f   Spanish
Spanish cognate of AMBER.
AMBER   f   English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).
AMBRA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of AMBER.
AMBRE   f   French
French cognate of AMBER.
AMIT (1)   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Odia, Punjabi, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Means "immeasurable, infinite" in Sanskrit.
AMOR   m & f   Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and the name can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
AMRIT   m   Indian, Hindi
Means "immortal" from Sanskrit (a) meaning "not" and मृत (mrta) meaning "dead". In Hindu texts it refers to a drink which gives immortality.
AMRITA   f   Indian, Hindi, Punjabi, Bengali
Feminine form of AMRIT.
ANAND   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Gujarati, Bengali
Means "happiness, bliss" in Sanskrit.
ANANDA   m   Tamil
Variant of ANAND.
ANANDI   f   Indian, Hindi
Feminine form of ANAND.
ANANTA   m & f   Hinduism
Means "infinite, endless" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form अनन्त / अनंत (an epithet of the Hindu god Vishnu) and the feminine form अनन्ता / अनंता (an epithet of the goddess Parvati).
ANARA   f   Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Means "pomegranate" in Kazakh and Kyrgyz, ultimately from Persian.
ANATOLIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDREAS   m   German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.
ANGELICA   f   English, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANGELUS   m   Late Roman
Latin form of ANGEL.
ANIK   m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "army" or "splendour" in Sanskrit.
ANIKET   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "homeless" in Sanskrit.
ANISH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "supreme, paramount, without a ruler", from the Sanskrit negative prefix (a) and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, lord".
ANISHA   f   Indian, Hindi
Means "nightless, sleepless" in Sanskrit.
ANIT   m   Indian, Hindi
Possibly means "not guided" in Sanskrit.
ANITA (2)   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil
Feminine form of ANIT.
ANJALI   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "salutation" in Sanskrit.
ANKIT   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali
Means "marked" in Sanskrit.
ANKITA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali
Feminine form of ANKIT.
ANKUR   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "sapling, sprout, shoot" in Sanskrit.
ANNUNZIATA   f   Italian
Means "announced" in Italian, referring to the event in the New Testament in which the angel Gabriel tells the Virgin Mary of the imminent birth of Jesus.
ANSHEL   m   Yiddish
Means "angel" in Yiddish.
ANTHEIA   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of ANTHEA.
ANTHOUSA   f   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of ANFISA.
ANUJ   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "born later, younger" in Sanskrit. This name is sometimes given to the younger sibling of an older child.
ANUJA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Feminine form of ANUJ.
ANUNCIACIÓN   f   Spanish
Spanish cognate of ANNUNZIATA.
ANUP   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Malayalam
Means "watery" in Sanskrit.
ANUPAM   m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "incomparable, matchless" in Sanskrit.
ANUPAMA   f   Indian, Hindi
Feminine form of ANUPAM.
AOIDE   f   Greek Mythology
Means "song" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of song.
APARAJITA   f   Bengali, Indian, Hindi
Means "unconquered" in Sanskrit.
APRIL   f   English
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
APURVA   m & f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "unpreceded, new" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form अपूर्व and the feminine form अपूर्वा.
ARABINDA   m   Bengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of ARAVIND.
ARACELI   f   Spanish
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARAVIND   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit.
ARCHANA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "honouring, praising" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu ritual.
ARETHA   f   English
Possibly derived from Greek αρετη (arete) meaning "virtue". This name was popularized in the 1960s by American singer Aretha Franklin (1942-).
ARGYROS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "silver" in Greek.
ARIJIT   m   Bengali
Means "conquering enemies" in Sanskrit.
ARISTON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek αριστος (aristos) meaning "the best".
ARYA   m & f   Persian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
ARYAN   m   Indian, Hindi
Variant of ARYA.
ASHA (1)   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
ASHWIN   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada
From Sanskrit अश्विन् (ashvin) meaning "possessed of horses". The Ashvins are twin Hindu gods of the sunrise and sunset.
ASIM (2)   m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "boundless, limitless" in Sanskrit.
ASSUMPCIÓ   f   Catalan
Catalan cognate of ASUNCIÓN.
ASSUMPTA   f   Irish
Latinate form of ASUNCIÓN, used especially in Ireland.
ASSUNÇÃO   f   Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of ASUNCIÓN.
ASSUNTA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of ASUNCIÓN.
ASTRA   f   English (Rare)
Means "star", ultimately from Greek αστηρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
ASTRAIA   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of ASTRAEA.
ASUNCIÓN   f   Spanish
Means "assumption" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
AURA   f   English
From the English word aura (derived from Greek via Latin meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
AUROBINDO   m   Bengali, Indian, Odia
Bengali and Odia variant of ARAVIND.
AVANI   f   Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "earth" in Sanskrit.
AVINASH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Kannada
Means "indestructable" in Sanskrit.
AVRA   f   Greek
Greek form of AURA.
AVRIL   f   French (Rare), English (Rare)
French form of APRIL.
AYAME   f   Japanese
From Japanese 菖蒲 (ayame) meaning "iris". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
BÉLA   m   Hungarian
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from a Slavic word meaning "white" or a Hungarian word meaning "within". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.
BĚLA   f   Czech
Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning "white".
BELIAL   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "worthless" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this term is used to refer to various wicked people. In the New Testament, Paul uses it as a name for Satan. In later Christian tradition Belial became an evil angel associated with lawlessness and lust.
BHAVANA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Means "producing, manifesting" in Sanskrit.
BIANCA   f   Italian, Romanian
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).
BIBEK   m   Nepali, Bengali
Nepali and Bengali form of VIVEK.
BILJANA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Croatian
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from the South Slavic word биље (bilje) meaning "herb".
BILYANA   f   Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of BILJANA.
BINAY   m   Bengali
Bengali form of VINAY.
BION   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from βιος (bios) meaning "life".
BISERA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the South Slavic word бисер (biser) "pearl".
BISERKA   f   Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of BISERA.
BISHAL   m   Nepali, Bengali
Nepali and Bengali form of VISHAL.
BISTRA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Means "clean, pure" in Bulgarian and Macedonian.
BLAGA   f   Bulgarian
Feminine form of BLAGOY.
BLAGICA   f   Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BLAGOJ   m   Macedonian
Macedonian form of BLAGOY.
BLAGOJE   m   Serbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of BLAGOY.
BLAGORODNA   f   Macedonian, Bulgarian
Means "noble" in Macedonian and Bulgarian.
BLAGOY   m   Bulgarian
Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BLAGUN   m   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BLANCA   f   Spanish
Spanish cognate of BLANCHE.
BLANCHE   f   French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BOLAT   m   Kazakh
From a Turkic word meaning "steel", ultimately from Persian.
BONAVENTURA   m   Italian
Means "good fortune" in Italian. Saint Bonaventura was a 13th-century Franciscan monk who is considered a Doctor of the Church.
BRAHMA   m   Hinduism
Means "growth, expansion, creation" in Sanskrit. The Hindu god Brahma is the creator and director of the universe, the balance between the opposing forces of Vishnu and Shiva. He is often depicted with four heads and four arms.
BRANCA   f   Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of BLANCHE.
BUDI   m   Indonesian
Means "reason, mind, character" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit बुद्धि (buddhi) meaning "intellect" (related to Buddha).
BUENAVENTURA   m   Spanish
Spanish form of BONAVENTURA.
CAHAYA   m & f   Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Malay and Indonesian.
CAHYO   m & f   Indonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of CAHAYA.
CAILEAN   m   Scottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CALANTHE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) "flower".
CAMELIA   f   Romanian
From camelie, the Romanian spelling of camellia (see CAMELLIA).
CAMELLIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CARA   f   English
From an Italian word meaning "beloved". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
CARIDAD   f   Spanish
Spanish cognate of CHARITY.
CARINA (1)   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARITA   f   Swedish
Derived from Latin caritas meaning "dearness, esteem, love".
CENGİZ   m   Turkish
Turkish form of GENGHIS.
CHANDAN   m   Indian, Hindi, Bengali, Odia
Derived from Sanskrit चन्दन (chandana) meaning "sandalwood".
CHANDANA   f   Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Hindi
Feminine form of CHANDAN.
CHANDRA   m & f   Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHARA   f   Greek
Means "happiness, joy" in Greek.
CHARES   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian general. It was also borne by the sculptor who crafted the Colossus of Rhodes.
CHARISMA   f   English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χαρις (charis) "grace, kindness".
CHARITA   f   Various
Latinate form of CHARITY.
CHARITON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.
CHARITY   f   English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas meaning "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
CHETAN   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Kannada
Means "visible, conscious, soul" in Sanskrit.
CHETANA   f   Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Feminine form of CHETAN.
CHINGIS   m   Mongolian
Mongolian form of GENGHIS.
CHIRANJIVI   m   Indian, Hindi, Telugu
Means "long-lived, infinite" in Sanskrit.
CHRYSES   m   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden". In Greek mythology Chryses was the father of Chryseis, a woman captured by Agamemnon during the Trojan War.
COILEAN   m   Irish
Irish form of CAILEAN.
COLUMBA   m & f   Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
CONCEPCIÓN   f   Spanish
Means "conception" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. A city in Chile bears this name.
CONCEPTA   f   Irish
Latinate form of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCETTA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCETTO   m   Italian
Masculine form of CONCETTA.
CORAL   f   English, Spanish
From the English and Spanish word coral for the underwater skeletal deposits which can form reefs. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κοραλλιον (korallion).
CORALIE   f   French
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CRUZ   f & m   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "cross" in Spanish or Portuguese, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.
CUSTÓDIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CUSTODIO.
CUSTODIA   f   Spanish
Feminine form of CUSTODIO.
CUSTÓDIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CUSTODIO.
CUSTODIO   m   Spanish
Means "guardian" in Spanish, from Latin custodia "protection, safekeeping".
CVETA   f   Serbian
Serbian form of CVETKA.
CVETKA   f   Slovene
Derived from Slovene cvet meaning "blossom, flower".
CVETKO   m   Slovene
Masculine form of CVETKA.
CVIJETA   f   Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of CVETKA.
CVITA   f   Croatian
Croatian form of CVETKA.
DAHLIA   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DAINA   f   Lithuanian, Latvian
Means "song" in Lithuanian and Latvian.
DALIA (1)   f   Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Spanish form of DAHLIA. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico.
DAMIANOS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DAMIAN.
DAMON   m   Greek Mythology, English
Derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.
DANICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DARINA (2)   f   Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic word dar meaning "gift". It can also be used as a diminutive of DARIA.
DARINKA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Either a diminutive of DARIJA, or a derivative of the Slavic word dar meaning "gift".
DARMA   m   Indonesian
Means "good deed" or "duty" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit धर्म (dharma).
DARSHAN   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Kannada
Means "seeing, observing, understanding" in Sanskrit.
DARSHANA   f   Indian, Marathi
Feminine form of DARSHAN.
DARYA (2)   f   Persian
Means "sea, ocean" in Persian.
DAVOR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Possibly from an old Slavic exclamation expressing joy or sorrow.
DEJAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Possibly derived from the South Slavic word dejati meaning "to act, to do". Otherwise it may be related to Latin deus "god".
DEMON   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from δημος (demos) "the people".
DENICA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian form and Macedonian variant of DANICA.
DERYA   f & m   Turkish
Means "sea, ocean" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
DEV   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit देव (deva) meaning "god".
DEYAN   m   Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of DEJAN.
DHANANJAY   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "winning wealth" in Sanskrit.
DHARMA   m   Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Nepali
Means "that which is established, law, duty, virtue" in Sanskrit.
DHAVAL   m   Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "dazzling white" in Sanskrit.
DIANTHA   f   Dutch, English (Rare)
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
DIKE   f   Greek Mythology
Means "justice" in Greek. In Greek mythology Dike was the goddess of justice, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai).
DIP   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Punjabi
Masculine form of DIPA.
DIPA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil
Means "light, lamp" in Sanskrit.
DIPAKA   m   Hinduism
Means "inflaming, exciting" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Kama, the Hindu god of love.
DIPALI   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "row of lamps" in Sanskrit.
DIPIKA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu
Feminine form of DIPAKA.
DIPTI   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada
Means "brightness, light" in Sanskrit.
DISHA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "region, direction" in Sanskrit.
DIVNA   f   Serbian, Macedonian
From Serbian диван (divan) or Macedonian дивен (diven) meaning "wonderful".
DIVYA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam
Means "divine, heavenly" in Sanskrit.
DOLORES   f   Spanish, English
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.
DOLORS   f   Catalan
Catalan form of DOLORES.
DORES   f   Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of DOLORES.
DORIAN   m   English, French
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.
DORIS   f   English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
DORON   m   Hebrew
Derived from Greek δωρον (doron) meaning "gift".
DUBRAVKA   f   Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of DUBRAVKO.
DUBRAVKO   m   Croatian, Serbian
From the old Slavic word dubrava meaning "oak grove".
DULCIE   f   English
From Latin dulcis meaning "sweet". It was used in the Middle Ages in the spellings Dowse and Duce, and was recoined in the 19th century.
DUNJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "quince" in the South Slavic languages, a quince being a type of fruit.
DUŠAN   m   Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
DUŠKO   m   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Variant of DUŠAN.
DZHOKHAR   m   Chechen
Possibly from Persian گوهر (gohar) "jewel, essence" or جوهر (johar) "essence, ink" (which comes from the same root, but via a loan to Arabic and retransmission to Persian).
DZVEZDA   f   Macedonian
Means "star" in Macedonian.
DZVEZDAN   m   Macedonian
Masculine form of DZVEZDA.
ELMAS   f   Turkish
Means "diamond" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
ELPIDIOS   m   Late Greek
Greek form of ELPIDIUS.
ELPIS   f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "hope" in Greek. In Greek mythology Elpis was the personification of hope. She was the last spirit to remain in the jar after Pandora unleashed the evils that were in it.
EMERALD   f   English (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).
ENEIDA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian), Spanish (Latin American)
From the Portuguese and Spanish name of the 'Aeneid' (see AENEAS).
ENGEL   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Originally this was a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe (known in English as the Angles). Since the Middle Ages it has been firmly associated with the German word engel meaning "angel".
EPIPHANES   m   Ancient Greek
Means "appearing, manifesting" in Greek. This was an epithet of two 2nd-century BC Hellenistic rulers: the Seleucid king Antiochus IV and the Ptolemaic king Ptolemy V.
EPIPHANIOS   m   Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of EPIFANIO.
EPIPHANY   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the Christian festival (January 6) which commemorates the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. It is also an English word meaning "sudden appearance" or "sudden perception", ultimately deriving from Greek επιφανεια (epiphaneia) "manifestation".
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
ESMERALDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESTELLE   f   English, French
From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTRELLA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of STELLA (1), coinciding with the Spanish word meaning "star".
EVANGELIJA   f   Macedonian
Macedonian feminine form of EVANGELOS.
EVANGELINE   f   English
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
EVANGELIYA   f   Bulgarian
Bulgarian feminine form of EVANGELOS.
EVANGELOS   m   Greek
Means "bringing good news" from the Greek word ευαγγελος (euangelos), a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελος (angelos) "messenger".
FALK   m   German
Means "falcon" in German.
FELICITAS   f   German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Latin name which meant "good luck, fortune". In Roman mythology the goddess Felicitas was the personification of good luck. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a slave martyred with her master Perpetua in Carthage.
FELICITY   f   English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.
FIORELLA   f   Italian
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FLEUR   f   French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLORINDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Elaborated form of Spanish or Portuguese flor meaning "flower".
FLORUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin flos meaning "flower".
FLOWER   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
FOREST   m   English
Variant of FORREST, or else directly from the English word forest.
FRANCO (1)   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of FRANK (1).
GAIA   f   Greek Mythology, Italian
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GENGHIS   m   History
From the title Genghis (or Chinggis) Khan, meaning "universal ruler", which was adopted by the Mongol Empire founder Temujin in the late 12th century. Remembered both for his military brilliance and his brutality towards civilians, he went on to conquer huge areas of Asia and Eastern Europe.
GENTIAN   m   Albanian
From the name of the flowering plant called the gentian, the roots of which are used to create a tonic. It is derived from the name of the Illyrian king GENTIUS, who supposedly discovered its medicinal properties.
GENTIANA   f   Albanian
Feminine form of GENTIAN.
GERD (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd was a fertility goddess, a frost giantess who was the wife of Freyr.
GEREON   m   German, Late Roman
Possibly derived from Greek γερων (geron) meaning "old man, elder". This was the name of a saint martyred in Cologne in the 4th century.
GERONTIUS   m   Late Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Greek γερων (geron) "old man".
GIADA   f   Italian
Italian form of JADE.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).
GOHAR   f   Armenian
Means "jewel" in Armenian, ultimately of Persian origin.
GOL   f   Persian
Means "flower, rose" in Persian.
GORAN   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Means "mountain man", derived from South Slavic gora "mountain". It was popularized by the Croatian poet Ivan Goran Kovačić (1913-1943), who got his middle name because of the mountain town where he was born.
GORDAN   m   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic gord meaning "dignified". This name and the feminine form Gordana were popularized by the publication of Croatian author Marija Jurić Zagorka's novel 'Gordana' (1935).
GRAÇA   f   Portuguese
Means "grace" in Portuguese, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GRACE   f   English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
GRACIA   f   Spanish
Means "grace" in Spanish, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GRACJA   f   Polish
Polish form of GRACIA.
GRATIA   f   German
Means "grace" in Latin.
GRAZIA   f   Italian
Means "grace" in Italian, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GROZDA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Feminine form of GROZDAN.
GROZDAN   m   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from Bulgarian or Macedonian грозде (grozde) meaning "grapes".
GROZDANA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian
Feminine form of GROZDAN.
GÜL   f   Turkish
Means "rose" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
GUL   m & f   Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
GÜLİSTAN   f   Turkish
Means "rose garden" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
GULISTAN   f   Kurdish
Kurdish form of GÜLİSTAN.
GURGEN   m   Armenian, Georgian
Derived from Middle Persian gurg "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several Georgian kings and princes.
HAGNE   f   Ancient Greek
Greek form of AGNES.
HALCYON   f   Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek αλκυων (from the same source as Alcyone).
HARI   m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
HARSHA   m   Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Sanskrit
Means "happiness" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 7th-century emperor of northern India. He was also noted as an author.
HARSHAD   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit हर्ष (harsha) meaning "happiness".
HARSHAL   m   Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Derived from Sanskrit हर्ष (harsha) meaning "happiness".
HARTA   m   Indonesian
Means "wealth, treasure, property" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit अर्थ (artha).
HELIOS   m   Greek Mythology
Means "sun" in Greek. This was the name of the young Greek sun god, who rode across the sky each day in a chariot pulled by four horses.
HEMA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Kannada
Means "golden" in Sanskrit.
HERO (1)   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).
HERON   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HILARION   m   Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ιλαρος (hilaros) meaning "cheerful". This was the name of a 4th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Anthony.
HINATA   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written ひなた using the hiragana writing system.
HOSANNA   f   Biblical
From the Aramaic religious expression הושע נא (Hosha' na') meaning "deliver us" in Hebrew. In the New Testament this is exclaimed by those around Jesus when he first enters Jerusalem.
HYACINTH (2)   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone which also bears this name), ultimately from Greek ‘υακινθος (hyakinthos).
İLHAN   m   Turkish
From the Mongolian title il-Khan meaning "subordinate Khan", which was first adopted by Genghis Khan's grandson Hulagu, who ruled a kingdom called the Ilkhanate that stretched from modern Iran to eastern Turkey.
IMACULADA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of INMACULADA.
IMMACOLATA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of INMACULADA.
Next Page        846 results (this is page 1 of 3)