Names Categorized "fauna"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fauna.
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ADERYN   f   Welsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AGRIPPA   m & f   Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from Greek αγριος (agrios) "wild" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" or possibly of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
ALCIPPE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκιππη (Alkippe), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
ALCYONE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
ANNE (2)   m & f   Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
ANTIMAN   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
AQUILA   m & f   Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which meant "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
ARELI   m   Biblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
ARI (1)   m   Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
ARI (2)   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
ARIES   m   Roman Mythology
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
ARN   m   English
Short form of ARNOLD.
ARNBJÖRG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
ARNOLD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARVID   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
ASAD   m   Arabic, Urdu
Means "lion" in Arabic.
ÁSBJÖRN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and björn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of OSBORN.
ASTOR   m   English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
AVIS   f   English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AYELET   f   Hebrew
Means "gazelle, hind". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
BAMBI   f   English
Derived from Italian bambina meaning "young girl". The American novelist Marjorie Benton Cooke used it in her novel 'Bambi' (1914). This was also the name of a male deer in a cartoon by Walt Disney, which was based on a 1923 novel by Swiss author Felix Salten.
BEN (2)   m   Dutch
Short form of BERNHARD and other Germanic names beginning with the element bern meaning "bear".
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BORIS   m   Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century king Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BRADÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic meaning "salmon".
BUCK   m   English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
CEREN   f   Turkish
Means "young gazelle" in Turkish.
CORBIN   m   English
From a French surname which was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
CRAWFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CUÁN   m   Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from the Irish element meaning "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CUAUHTÉMOC   m   Native American, Nahuatl
Means "falling eagle" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the last Aztec emperor, ruling until he was captured and executed by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés in the year 1525.
DORCAS   f   Biblical
Derived from Greek δορκας (dorkas) meaning "gazelle". This is the Greek translation of the name Tabitha in the New Testament (see Acts 9:36).
DOVE   f   English
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
DRACO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
DRAKE   m   English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
DRAKON   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of DRACO.
ELMER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
ETHELINDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelind, derived from the elements æðel "noble" and lindi "snake". The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
FAUNA   f   Roman Mythology
Feminine form of FAUNUS. Fauna was a Roman goddess of fertility, women and healing, a daughter and companion of Faunus.
FAWN   f   English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FIACHRA   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners, a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France.
HALCYON   f   Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek αλκυων (from the same source as Alcyone).
HARTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hart clearing" in Old English.
HAYATO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
HERSH   m   Yiddish
Means "deer" in Yiddish. The deer is particularly associated with the tribe of Naphtali (see Genesis 49:21).
HORST   m   German
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively, it may derive from the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse".
HRAFN   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
HULDA (2)   f   Biblical
Variant of HULDAH.
HULDAH   f   Biblical
Means "weasel, mole" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to a prophetess.
INGOLF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with úlfr meaning "wolf".
JAEL   f   Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
JELENA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JONAH   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
KHULAN   f   Mongolian
Means "onager, wild donkey" in Mongolian. This was the name of a wife of Genghis Khan.
KIMIMELA   f   Native American, Sioux
Means "butterfly" in Lakota.
KIT   m & f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
LARK   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LEONIDAS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion" combined with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life and his army defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.
LOWELL   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix. The surname was borne by American poet and satirist James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).
MATHGHAMHAIN   m   Ancient Irish
Means "bear" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of a brother of the Irish king Brian Boru.
MERLE   f & m   English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MIDGE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MADGE.
OISÍN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.
OPHRAH   m   Biblical
Means "fawn" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a man mentioned in genealogies and a city in Manasseh.
OSBORN   m   English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
PALOMA   f   Spanish
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.
PEREGRINE   m   English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PHILOMEL   f   Literature
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
PHINEAS   m   Biblical
Variant of PHINEHAS used in some versions of the Bible.
PHINEHAS   m   Biblical
Probably means "Nubian" from the Egyptian name Panhsj, though some believe it means "serpent's mouth" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament Phinehas is a grandson of Aaron who kills an Israelite because he is intimate with a Midianite woman, thus stopping a plague sent by God. Also in the Bible this is the son of Eli, killed in battle with the Philistines.
QUETZALCOATL   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
RALEIGH   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name meaning either "red clearing" or "roe deer clearing" in Old English.
RASHA   f   Arabic
Means "young gazelle" in Arabic.
RAVEN   f & m   English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
RHEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ρεια (Rheia), meaning unknown, perhaps related to ‘ρεω (rheo) "to flow" or ερα (era) "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
ROBIN   m & f   English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
RONNE   m   Frisian
Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element hraban meaning "raven".
ROSCOE   m   English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.
SANDALIO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of Sandalius, a Latinized form of the Gothic name Sandulf which meant "true wolf" from sand "true" and ulf "wolf". This was the name of a 9th-century Spanish saint martyred by the Moors.
SEQUOYAH   m   Native American, Cherokee
Possibly from Cherokee siqua meaning "hog". This was the name of the Cherokee man (also known as George Guess) who devised the Cherokee writing system in the 19th century.
SHER   m   Urdu, Pashto
Means "lion" in Persian. A famous bearer of this name was Sher Shah, a 16th-century Mughal ruler.
SPARROW   m & f   English (Rare)
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
SUZUME   f   Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese (suzume) meaning "sparrow", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations which are pronounced the same way.
SWANHILD   f   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
TODD   m   English
From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
TURGAY   m   Turkish
Means "skylark" in Turkish.
UTHMAN   m   Arabic
Means "baby bustard" in Arabic (a bustard is a type of large bird). Uthman was a companion of Muhammad who married two of his daughters. He was the third caliph of the Muslims.
VELVEL   m   Yiddish
Means "wolf" in Yiddish. This name can also be used as a Yiddish form of WILLIAM.
VESPASIAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Vespasianus, derived either from Latin vesper meaning "west" or "evening" or vespa meaning "wasp". This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the founder of the Flavian dynasty.
WOLFGANG   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
WOLFRAM   m   German
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn "raven".
WREN   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
XANTHIPPOS   m   Ancient Greek
From the Greek elements ξανθος (xanthos) "yellow" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian general.
ZITKALA   f   Native American, Sioux
Means "bird" in Lakota.
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