Names Categorized "strength"

This is a list of names in which the categories include strength.
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ÆÐELÞRYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength".
ALBERICH m Ancient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements alf "elf" and ric "power". Alberich was the name of the sorcerer king of the dwarfs in Germanic mythology. He also appears in the 'Nibelungenlied' as a dwarf who guards the treasure of the Nibelungen.
ALBERICO m Italian
Italian form of ALBERICH.
ALCAEUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλκαιος (Alkaios), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength". This was the name of a 7th-century BC lyric poet from the island of Lesbos.
ALCIPPE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκιππη (Alkippe), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
ALCMENE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκμηνη (Alkmene), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and μηνη (mene) "moon". In Greek mythology Alcmene was the wife of Amphitryon. She was the mother of Herakles by Zeus, who bedded her by disguising himself as her absent husband.
ALKMENE f Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of ALCMENE.
AMALASUINTHA f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MILLICENT.
ANSALDO m Italian
Italian form of a Germanic name composed of the elements ans "god" and wald "power, leader, ruler".
ARNOLD m English, German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
AUBERON m English (Rare)
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably ALBERICH.
AUDIE f English
Diminutive of AUDREY.
AUDRA (2) f English
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.
AUDREY f English
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
'AZIZ m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic عزيز (see AZIZ).
AZIZ m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Uzbek
Means "powerful, respected, beloved", derived from Arabic عزّ ('azza) meaning "to be powerful" or "to be cherished". In Islamic tradition العزيز (al-'Aziz) is one of the 99 names of Allah. A notable bearer of the name was Al-'Aziz, a 10th-century Fatimid caliph.
AZİZE f Turkish
Turkish feminine form of AZIZ.
BALADEVA m Hinduism
Means "god of strength" from Sanskrit बल (bala) meaning "strength" combined with देव (deva) meaning "god". Baladeva (also called Balarama) is the name of the older brother of the Hindu god Krishna.
BALAKRISHNA m Indian, Telugu, Kannada
From Sanskrit बल (bala) meaning "strength, might" combined with the name of the Hindu god KRISHNA.
BAT-ERDENE m Mongolian
Means "strong jewel" in Mongolian.
CENRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
COMFORT f English (Rare)
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation.
DROUSILLA f Biblical Greek
Form of DRUSILLA used in the Greek New Testament.
DRUSA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of DRUSUS.
DRUSILLA f Biblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.
DRUSUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name, also sometimes used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Claudia family. Apparently the name was first assumed by a Roman warrior who killed a Gallic chieftain named Drausus in single combat. Drausus possibly derives from a Celtic element meaning "strong".
ELFREDA f English
Middle English form of the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength", derived from the element ælf "elf" combined with þryð "strength". Ælfþryð was common amongst Anglo-Saxon nobility, being borne for example by the mother of King Æðelræd the Unready. This name was rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
ELFRIEDA f English
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELFRIEDE f German
German form of ELFREDA.
ERMENDRUD f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and thrud "strength".
ERMINTRUDE f English (Archaic)
English form of ERMENDRUD. It was occasionally used until the 19th century.
ETHELDRED f Medieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETHELDREDA f Medieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
EZEKIAS m Biblical Greek
Form of HEZEKIAH used in the Greek Old Testament.
EZIZ m Turkmen
Turkmen form of AZIZ.
FARVALD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and wald "power, leader, ruler".
GEBHARD m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element geb "gift" combined with hard "brave, hardy". Saint Gebhard was a 10th-century bishop of Constance.
GELTRUDE f Italian
Italian form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDE f English, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GRUFFUDD m Welsh
From the Old Welsh name Griphiud, the second element deriving from Welsh udd "lord, prince" but the first element being of uncertain meaning (possibly cryf "strong"). This was a common name among medieval Welsh royalty. Gruffudd (or Gruffydd) ap Llywelyn was an 11th-century Welsh ruler who fought against England.
GUISCARD m Medieval French
Norman French form of the Norman name Wischard, formed of the Old Norse elements viskr "wise" and hórðr "brave, hardy".
HALE (2) m English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
HAROLD m English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HEZEKIAH m Biblical
From the Hebrew name חִזְקִיָהוּ (Chizqiyahu), which means "YAHWEH strengthens", from the roots חָזַק (chazaq) meaning "to strength" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This name was borne by a powerful king of Judah who reigned in the 8th and 7th centuries BC. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of an ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah.
HILTRUD f German
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
JABBAR m Arabic
Means "powerful" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الجبّار (al-Jabbar) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
JIAN m & f Chinese
From Chinese (jiàn) meaning "build, establish", (jiàn) meaning "strong, healthy", or other characters which are pronounced in a similar fashion.
K'AWIIL m Mayan Mythology
Means "powerful" in Mayan. This is the name of the Maya god of lightning. He was sometimes depicted with one of his legs taking the form of a serpent.
KEN (2) m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
KEN'ICHI m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" combined with (ichi) meaning "one". Other kanji combinations are possible.
KENTA m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" and (ta) meaning "thick, big", as well as other kanji combinations having the same pronunciation.
MANDLENKOSI m Southern African, Zulu, Ndebele
From Zulu and Ndebele amandla "strength, power" and inkosi "king, chief".
MANFRED m German, Dutch, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name of the main character in Byron's drama 'Manfred' (1817). This name was also borne by Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MATILDA f English, Swedish, Finnish
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.... [more]
MÉLISANDE f French
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
MELISENDE f Medieval French
Old French form of MILLICENT.
MILLICENT f English
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
NERO (1) m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen, which was probably of Sabine origin meaning "strong, vigourous". It was borne most infamously by a tyrannical Roman emperor of the 1st century.
NJORD m Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old Norse Njörðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigourous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
PEGASUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Πηγασος (Pegasos), possibly either from πηγος (pegos) "strong" or πηγαιος (pegaios) "from a water spring". In Greek mythology Pegasus was the winged horse that sprang from the blood of Medusa after she was killed by Perseus. There is a constellation in the northern sky named after the horse.
PHILOKRATES m Ancient Greek
Means "friend of power" from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and κρατος (kratos) "power".
PHILOMENA f English, German, Late Greek
From Greek φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and μενος (menos) "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in the 19th century after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομηνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
QADIR m Arabic
Means "capable, powerful" in Arabic. This transcription represents two different ways of spelling the name in Arabic. In Islamic tradition القادر (al-Qadir) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
RAGNVALDR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "power, ruler" (making it a cognate of REYNOLD).
RONALDA f Scottish
Feminine form of RONALD.
RONNETTE f English (Rare)
Feminine form of RONALD.
ROSTAM m Persian, Persian Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly from Avestan raodha "to grow" and takhma "strong, brave, valiant". Rostam was a warrior hero in Persian legend. The 11th-century Persian poet Firdausi recorded his tale in the 'Shahnameh'.
SIMBA (1) m Southern African, Shona
Means "strength" in Shona.
SÓLVEIG f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of SOLVEIG.
SOLVEIG f Norwegian, Swedish
From an Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play 'Peer Gynt' (1876).
SOLVEIGA f Latvian, Lithuanian
Latvian and Lithuanian form of SOLVEIG.
SOLVEJ f Danish
Danish form of SOLVEIG.
SØLVI f Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SOLVEIG. It is also used as a short form of SILVIA.
SOLVIG f Swedish
Swedish variant form of SOLVEIG.
SWIÐHUN m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SWITHIN.
SWITHIN m History
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub". Saint Swithin was a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
SWITHUN m History
Variant of SWITHIN.
SYLVI f Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish
Norwegian and Swedish variant of SOLVEIG. It is also used as a short form of SYLVIA.
TRUDE f Norwegian
Norwegian form of TRUDI.
TRUDI f German, English
Diminutive of GERTRUDE and other Germanic names ending with the element thrud "strength".
TRUDIE f English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
TRUDY f English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
VALENCIA f Various
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".
VALENTINE (1) m English
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.
VALERIA f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
VALERIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin valere "to be strong". This was the name of several early saints.
WALBURGA f German
Means "ruler of the fortress" from the Germanic elements wald "power, leader, ruler" and burg "fortress". This was the name of an 8th-century saint from England who did missionary work in Germany.
WEALDMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WILLIHARD m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hard "brave, hardy".