Names Categorized "war"

This is a list of names in which the categories include war.
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AGNARmNorwegian, Icelandic
From the Old Norse name Agnarr, derived from agi "awe, terror" or egg "edge of a sword" combined with arr "warrior".
ALDITHfMedieval English
Middle English form of EALDGYÐ.
ALFHILDfNorwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Norse legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to King Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
ALMA (1)fEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALVARmSwedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
ALWILDAfHistory
Latinized form of ALFHILD. This was the name of a legendary female Scandinavian pirate, also called Awilda.
ARESmGreek Mythology
Perhaps from either Greek αρη (are) "bane, ruin" or αρσην (arsen) "male". The name first appears as a-re in Mycenaean Greek writing. Ares was the blood-thirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.
ARIS (1)mGreek
Modern Greek form of ARES. It is also used as a short form of ARISTOTELIS.
ASHTORETHfBiblical, Semitic Mythology
From עַשְׁתֹרֶת ('Ashtoret), the Hebrew form of the name of a Phoenician goddess of love, war and fertility. Her name is cognate to that of the East Semitic goddess ISHTAR.
AUDHILDfNorwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements auðr "wealth, fortune" and hildr "battle".
AVERILLm & fEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
BAHRAMmPersian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Verethragna meaning "victory over resistance". This was the name of a Zoroastrian god (one of the Amesha Spenta) associated with victory and war. This name was borne by several Sassanid emperors. It is also the Persian name for the planet Mars.
BÅRDmNorwegian
Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Bárðr, which was derived from the elements baðu "battle" and friðr "peace".
BLAIRm & fScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BOŘIVOJmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements borti "battle" and voji "soldier". This name was borne by a 9th-century duke of Bohemia.
BRUNHILDAfHistory
Variant of BRÜNHILD, referring to the Frankish queen.
CADOCmWelsh
Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CADWGANmWelsh
Means "glory in battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwogawn "glory, honour". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, this name is briefly mentioned as the son of Iddon.
CATHALmIrish
Derived from the Gaelic elements cath "battle" and val "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
CATHÁNmIrish
Derived from Gaelic cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix.
CEALLACHmIrish
Irish name of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish ceallach "war, strife" or ceall "church".
CHADmEnglish
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CUNÉGONDEfFrench
French form of KUNIGUNDE. Voltaire used this name in his novel 'Candide' (1759).
CUNIGUNDfAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of KUNIGUNDE.
EALDGYÐfAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
ENYOfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. She was a blood-thirsty Greek war goddess and a companion of Ares.
EOFORHILDfAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ERISfGreek Mythology
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
ESELDfCornish
Cornish form of ISOLDE.
EVERILDfHistory
Latinized form of EOFORHILD. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
GARRETTmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GERARDmEnglish, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with hard meaning "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GORDONmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name in Berwickshire meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GRISELDAfEnglish, Scottish, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GRIZELfScottish
Scottish variant of GRISELDA.
GUNBORGfSwedish
From the Old Norse name Gunnbjörg, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and björg "help, save, rescue".
GUNDAfGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNHILDfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
GUNNARmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of GÜNTHER). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
GÜNTHERmGerman, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
GUNTRAMmGerman
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
GUNVORfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvör meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vor "vigilant, cautious".
HAROLDmEnglish
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HARVEYmEnglish
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HEILWIGfGerman (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements heil "happy, hearty, healthy" and wig "war".
HILDAfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDEBERTmGerman (Rare)
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
HILDEGARDfGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILDREDf & mEnglish
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HILTRUDfGerman
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
ILBERTmEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name HILDEBERT.
IMELDAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of IRMHILD. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
IRMHILDfGerman
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and hild "battle".
ISHILDfAncient Germanic (Hypothetical)
Germanic name, a hypothetical early form of ISOLDE.
ISHTARfSemitic Mythology
Meaning unknown. Ishtar was an Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess who presided over love, war and fertility. She was cognate with the Canaanite and Phoenician Ashtoreth, and she was also identified with the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
ISOLDEfEnglish (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".... [more]
IVORmIrish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
JITENDRAmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "conqueror of Indra" from Sanskrit जिति (jiti) meaning "victory, conquering" combined with the name of the god INDRA.
KRIEMHILDfGerman (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
KUNEGUNDAfPolish (Rare)
Polish form of KUNIGUNDE. The 13th-century Saint Kunegunda was the daughter of Bela IV, king of Hungary. She married Boleslaus V of Poland, but after his death refused to assume power and instead became a nun.
KUNIGONDEfDutch
Dutch form of KUNIGUNDE.
KUNIGUNDEfGerman (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic element kuni "clan, family" combined with gund "war". Saint Kunigunde was the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Henry II.
LOUISmFrench, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LUDWIGmGerman
From the Germanic name Chlodovech, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
MAFALDAfItalian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA.
MARSmRoman Mythology
Possibly related to Latin mas "male" (genitive maris). In Roman mythology Mars was the god of war, often equated with the Greek god Ares. This is also the name of the fourth planet in the solar system.
MATILDAfEnglish, Swedish, Finnish
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.... [more]
NEITHfEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Nit, possibly meaning "water". This was the name of an early Egyptian goddess of weaving, hunting and war. Her character may have some correspondences with the goddesses Tanith, Anat or Athena.
PTOLEMYmHistory
From the Greek name Πτολεμαιος (Ptolemaios), derived from Greek πολεμηιος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive, warlike". Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendants of Ptolemy I, one of the generals of Alexander the Great. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer.
RATIMIRmCroatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rati meaning "war, battle" and miru meaning "peace, world".
ROMILDAf & mItalian, Ancient Germanic
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
SKANDAmHinduism
Means "hopping, spurting, spilling" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of the god of war, also known as Kartikeya or Murugan. He is worshipped especially by the Tamils in southern India.
SWANHILDfGerman (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
TAKEHIKOmJapanese
From Japanese (take) meaning "military, martial" or (take) meaning "bamboo" combined with (hiko) meaning "boy, prince". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
THORmNorse Mythology, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
TYRmNorse Mythology
Norse form of the name of the Germanic god Tiwaz, related to Indo-European dyeus (see ZEUS). In Norse mythology Tyr was the god of war and justice, the son of the god Odin. He carried a spear in his left hand, since his right hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
VAHAGNmArmenian Mythology, Armenian
From Avestan Verethragna meaning "breaking of defense, victory". In Armenian mythology this was the name of the heroic god of war.
WALTERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WYSTANmEnglish (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
ZELDA (2)fEnglish
Short form of GRISELDA.