English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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KEANNA f English (Modern)
Combination of the popular name prefix Ke and ANNA.
KEATON m English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "shed town" in Old English.
KEEFE m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh meaning "descendant of CAOMH".
KEEGAN m Irish, English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
KEELY f English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".
KEIGHLEY f English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from an English place name, ultimately meaning "clearing belonging to Cyhha". The Old English given name Cyhha is of unknown meaning. This name also serves as a variant of KAYLEE.
KEIR m Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of KERR.
KEIRA f English (Modern)
Variant of CIARA (1). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
KEITH m English, Scottish
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KELCEY m & f English (Rare)
Variant of KELSEY.
KELDA f English (Rare)
Possibly derived from Old Norse kildr meaning "a spring".
KELIA f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name.
KELLEY f & m English
Variant of KELLY.
KELLI f English
Variant of KELLY.
KELLIE f English
Variant of KELLY.
KELLY m & f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KELSEY f & m English
From an English surname that is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KELVIN m English
From the name of a Scottish river, perhaps meaning "narrow water". As a title it was borne by the Irish-Scottish physicist William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), who acquired his title from the river.
KEMP m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
KEN (1) m English
Short form of KENNETH.
KENDAL m & f English (Modern)
From a surname that was a variant of KENDALL.
KENDALL m & f English
From a surname that comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENDRA f English
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.
KENDRICK m English
From a surname that has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENELM m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KENNARD m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KENNEDY f & m English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).
KENNETH m Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KENNITH m English
Variant of KENNETH.
KENNY m Scottish, English
Diminutive of KENNETH.
KENT m English
From a surname that was originally derived from Kent, the name of a county in England, which may be derived from a Brythonic word meaning "coastal district".
KENTON m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name meaning either "town on the River Kenn" or "royal town" in Old English.
KENYA f English, African American
From the name of the African country. The country is named for Mount Kenya, which in the Kikuyu language is called Kĩrĩnyaga meaning "the one having stripes". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 1960s.
KENYON m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name, of uncertain meaning.
KENZIE m & f English
Short form of MACKENZIE.
KERENSA f English (Rare)
Means "love" in Cornish.
KERI f English
Feminine variant of KERRY.
KERMIT m English
From a Manx surname, a variant of the Irish surname MacDermott meaning "son of DIARMAID". Theodore Roosevelt used it for one of his sons. The name is now associated with Kermit the Frog, one of the Muppets created by puppeteer Jim Henson.
KERR m Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from a place name meaning "rough wet ground" in Old Norse.
KERRI f English
Feminine variant of KERRY.
KERRIE f English
Feminine variant of KERRY.
KERRY m & f English
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "CIAR's people".
KESTREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
KEV m English
Short form of KEVIN.
KEVIN m English, Irish, French (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
KEVYN m & f English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of KEVIN.
KIARA f English (Modern)
Variant of CIARA (1) or CHIARA. This name was brought to public attention in 1988 after the singing duo Kiara released their song 'This Time'. It was further popularized by a character in the animated movie 'The Lion King II' (1998).
KIARAN m English (Rare)
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KIEFER m English (Modern)
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".
KIERA f Irish, English
Anglicized form of CIARA (1).
KIERAN m Irish, English
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KIERON m Irish, English
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KIERRA f English (Modern)
Variant of KIARA influenced by the spelling of SIERRA.
KIKI f English, German, Greek
Diminutive of names beginning with or containing the sound K.
KILEY f English
Variant of KYLIE.
KIM (1) f & m English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
KIMBALL m English
From a surname that was derived from either the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KIMBERLY f English
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
KIMBERLYN f English (Rare)
Combination of KIMBERLY and LYNN.
KIMMIE f English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KIMMY f English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KING m English
From a nickname that derives from the English word king, ultimately from Old English cyning.
KINGSLEY m English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
KINGSTON m English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English.
KINLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was an Anglicized form of Mac Fhionnlaigh meaning "son of FIONNLAGH".
KINSLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KIP m English
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".
KIPLING m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Cyppel's people". The surname was borne by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), a British novelist born in India who wrote 'The Jungle Book' and other works.
KIRBY m English
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "church settlement" in Old Norse.
KIRK m English
From an English and Scottish surname meaning "church" from Old Norse kirkja, ultimately from Greek. A famous bearer was American actor Kirk Douglas (1916-), whose birth name was Issur Danielovitch.
KIRSTEN f Danish, Norwegian, English
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.
KIT m & f English
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
KITTY f English
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KIZZIE f English
Diminutive of KEZIAH.
KIZZY f English
Diminutive of KEZIAH. This particular spelling was repopularized in the late 1970s by a character in the book and miniseries 'Roots'.
KNOX m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Old English cnocc "round hill".
KOREY m English
Variant of COREY.
KORI f English
Feminine form of COREY.
KORY m English
Variant of COREY.
KRIS m & f English, Danish
Short form of KRISTIAN, KRISTOFFER, and other names beginning with Kris.
KRISTAL f English
Variant of CRYSTAL.
KRISTI f English
Variant of KRISTY.
KRISTIE f English
Variant of KRISTY.
KRISTIN f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, English
Scandinavian and German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTINA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, German, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Serbian, Croatian, Faroese, English, Bulgarian
Form of CHRISTINA in several languages. It is also an English variant of CHRISTINA and a Bulgarian variant of HRISTINA.
KRISTINE f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, English, German
Scandinavian form of CHRISTINE, as well as an English and German variant.
KRISTY f English
Short form of CHRISTINA.
KRYSTAL f English
Variant of CRYSTAL.
KURT m German, English
German contracted form of CONRAD. A famous bearer was the American musician Kurt Cobain (1967-1994).
KURTIS m English
Variant of CURTIS.
KYLA f English
Feminine form of KYLE.
KYLE m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
KYLEE f English
Variant of KYLIE.
KYLER m English (Modern)
Probably a variant of KYLE, blending it with TYLER. It also coincides with the rare surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler, which is of uncertain meaning.
KYLIE f English
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
KYNASTON m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "CYNEFRIÐ's town" in Old English.
KYRA f English
Variant of KIRA (2), sometimes considered a feminine form of CYRUS.
KYRIE m & f English (Modern)
From the name of a Christian prayer, also called the Kyrie eleison meaning "Lord, have mercy". It is ultimately from Greek κυριος (kyrios) meaning "lord". In America it was popularized as a masculine name by basketball player Kyrie Irving (1992-), whose name is pronounced differently than the prayer.
LACEY f & m English
From a surname that was a variant of LACY.
LACHLAN m Scottish, English (Australian)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann.
LACI (2) f English
Variant of LACY.
LACY f & m English
From a surname that was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name that was Latinized as Lascius.
LAIRD m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname meaning "landowner".
LAKE m & f English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
LALIA f English (Rare)
Short form of EULALIA.
LALLIE f English (Rare)
Diminutive of LALAGE.
LALLY f English (Rare)
Diminutive of LALAGE.
LAMAR m English, African American
From a French and English surname, originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool".
LAMBERT m German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements landa "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LAMONT m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Logmaðr meaning "law man".
LANA f English, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).
LANCE m English
From the Germanic name Lanzo, originally a short form of names that began with the element landa meaning "land". During the Middle Ages it became associated with Old French lance "spear, lance". A famous bearer is American cyclist Lance Armstrong (1971-).
LANDON m English
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).
LANE m English
From a surname meaning "lane, path", which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.
LANEY f English
Diminutive of ELAINE.
LANFORD m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "long ford" in Old English.
LANGDON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of the surname LANDON.
LANNY m English
Diminutive of LANCE, LANDON, and other names beginning with Lan.
LARA (1) f Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LARAINE f English
Variant of LORRAINE.
LARISSA f English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
LARK f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
LARRIE m English
Diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LARRY m English
Diminutive of LAURENCE (1). A notable bearer is former basketball player Larry Bird (1956-).
LAURA f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAURAINE f English (Rare)
Variant of LORRAINE influenced by the spelling of LAURA.
LAUREEN f English
Diminutive of LAURA.
LAUREL f English
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LAUREN f & m English
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LAURENA f English (Rare)
Elaboration of LAUREN.
LAURENCE (1) m English
From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).... [more]
LAURENE f English
Diminutive of LAURA.
LAURESSA f English (Rare)
Diminutive of LAURA.
LAURIE f & m English, Dutch
Diminutive of LAURA or LAURENCE (1).
LAURISSA f English (Rare)
Diminutive of LAURA.
LAVENDER f English (Rare)
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
LAVERN m & f English
Variant of LAVERNE.
LAVERNE f & m English
From a surname that was derived from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder". It is sometimes associated with the Roman goddess Laverna or the Latin word vernus "of spring".
LAVINA f English
Variant of LAVINIA.
LAVONNE f English
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name YVONNE.
LAWRENCE m English
Variant of LAURENCE (1). This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.
LAWRIE m English
Diminutive of LAWRENCE.
LAWSON m English
From an English surname meaning "son of LAURENCE (1)".
LAYLA f Arabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
LAYNE m English
Variant of LANE.
LAYTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of English towns meaning "town with a leek garden" in Old English.
LAZ m English
Diminutive of LARRY.
LEAH f English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah), which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might be related to Akkadian littu meaning "cow". In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's younger sister Rachel, who he preferred. Leah later offered Jacob her handmaid Zilpah in order for him to conceive more children.... [more]
LEANN f English
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LEANNA f English
Probably this was originally a variant of LIANA. It is now often considered a combination of LEE and ANNA.
LEANNE f English
Combination of LEE and ANNE (1).
LEATRICE f English
Possibly a combination of LEAH and BEATRICE. This name was first brought to public attention by the American actress Leatrice Joy (1893-1985).
LEE m & f English
From a surname that was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEEANN f English
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LEESA f English
Variant of LISA.
LEGEND m English (Modern)
From the English word, referring to a story about the past (or by extension, a heroic character in such a story), ultimately from Latin legere "to read".
LEIGH f & m English
From a surname that was a variant of LEE.
LEIGHTON f & m English
From a surname that was a variant of LAYTON.
LEILA f Arabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.
LEITH m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, originally from the name of a Scottish town (now a district of Edinburgh), which is derived from Gaelic lìte "wet, damp". It is also the name of the river that flows though Edinburgh.
LELA (2) f English
Variant of LEILA.
LELAND m English
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).
LEMOINE m English (Rare)
From a French surname meaning "the monk" in French.
LEN m English
Short form of LEONARD.
LENA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENARD m English
Variant of LEONARD.
LENNIE m English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LENNON m & f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Leannáin, which means "descendant of Leannán". The name Leannán means "lover" in Irish. This surname was borne by musician John Lennon (1940-1980), a member of the Beatles.
LENNOX m & f Scottish, English (Modern)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
LENNY m English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LENORA f English
Short form of ELENORA.
LENORE f English
Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem 'The Raven' (1845).
LENOX m Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of LENNOX.
LEO m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEOLA f English
Feminine form of LEO.
LEON m English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONA f English, German, Czech
Feminine form of LEON.
LEONARD m English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements lewo "lion" (of Latin origin) and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, where it was used steadily through the Middle Ages, becoming even more common in the 20th century.
LEONE (2) f English
Variant of LEONA.
LEONTYNE f English (Rare)
Variant of LÉONTINE. This name was borne by opera singer Leontyne Price (1927-).
LEOPOLD m German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LEROY m English
From the French nickname le roi meaning "the king". It has been common as an English given name since the 19th century.
LES m English
Short form of LESLIE or LESTER.
LESIA f English
Short form of ALESIA.
LESLEY f & m English
Variant of LESLIE.
LESLIE f & m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
LESSIE f English
Diminutive of names containing the sound les, such as LESLIE.
LESTER m English
From a surname that was derived from the name of the city of Leicester, originally denoting a person who was from that place. The city's name is derived from the river name Ligore combined with Latin castra "camp".
LETA f English
Possibly derived from Latin laetus meaning "glad". Otherwise, it could be a short form of names ending in leta.
LETHA f English
Possibly a short form of ALETHA.
LETITIA f English
From the Late Latin name Laetitia meaning "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LETTICE f English (Archaic)
Medieval form of LETITIA.
LETTIE f English
Diminutive of LETTICE.
LETTY f English
Diminutive of LETTICE.
LEVI m Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
LEW (1) m English
Short form of LEWIS.
LEWIN m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LEWIS m English
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.
LEX m English, Dutch
Short form of ALEXANDER.
LEXA f English
Short form of ALEXANDRA or ALEXA.
LEXI f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LEXIA f English
Short form of ALEXIA.
LEXIE f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LEXINE f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LEXUS f English
Short form of ALEXUS. Its use has been influenced by the Lexus brand name (a line of luxury automobiles made by Toyota).
LEXY f English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LEYTON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of LAYTON.
LIAM m Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Irish short form of WILLIAM. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that.
LIANA f Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.
LIBBIE f English
Variant of LIBBY.
LIBBY f English
Originally a medieval diminutive of Ibb, itself a diminutive of ISABEL. It is also used as a diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LIBERTY f English
Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).
LIDDY f English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH or LYDIA.
LILA (2) f English
Variant of LEILA.
LILAC f English (Rare)
From the English word for the shrub with purple or white flowers. It is derived via Arabic from Persian.
LILAH f English
Variant of LEILA.
LILIAN f & m English, French
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.
LILIBET f English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LILIBETH f English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LILLIA f English
Short form of LILLIAN or an elaborated form of LILY.
LILLIAN f English
Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.
LILLIE f English
Variant of LILY.
LILLY f English, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.
LILY f English
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LINA (2) f English, Italian, Spanish, German, French, Lithuanian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Short form of names ending in lina.
LINCOLN m English
From a surname that was originally from the name of a city in England, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.