English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
There are 3,870 names matching your criteria. This is page 6.

HAILIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAL   m   English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HALE (2)   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
HALEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English heall "manor, hall", originally belonging to a person who lived or worked in a manor.
HALLAM   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning either "at the rocks" or "at the nook" in Old English.
HALLE (2)   f   English (Modern)
In the case of American actress Halle Berry (1966-), it is from the name of a department store in Cleveland where she was born (the store was founded by brothers bearing the German surname Halle, a cognate of HALL).
HALLIE   f   English
Diminutive of HARRIET.
HAMILTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". The surname was originally taken from the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists)... [more]
HAMMOND   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from either the Germanic given name Haimund which meant "home protection" or else from the Old Norse given name Hámundr which meant "high protection".
HAMNET   m   English (Archaic)
Diminutive of HAMO. This was the name of a son of Shakespeare who died in childhood. His death may have provided the inspiration for his father's play 'Hamlet'.
HANK   m   English
Originally a short form of Hankin which was a medieval diminutive of JOHN. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of HENRY, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive HENK... [more]
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace"... [more]
HAPPY   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HARDING   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name HEARD. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARDY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Middle English hardi "brave, hardy".
HARLAN   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
HARLAND   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of HARLAN.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARMON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HERMAN.
HARMONIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HARMONY.
HARMONY   f   English
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler"... [more]
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HARRIET   f   English
English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century... [more]
HARRIETT   f   English
Variant of HARRIET.
HARRIETTA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HARRIET.
HARRIETTE   f   English
Variant of HARRIET.
HARRIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901)... [more]
HARRY   m   English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD... [more]
HARTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hart clearing" in Old English.
HARVE   m   English
Short form of HARVEY.
HARVEY   m   English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind... [more]
HARVIE   m   English
Variant of HARVEY.
HATTIE   f   English
Diminutive of HARRIET.
HATTY   f   English
Diminutive of HARRIET.
HAVEN   f & m   English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYDN   m   English (British)
From a German surname meaning "heathen". It is used in honour of the Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing")... [more]
HAYLIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HAZE   f   English (Rare)
Short form of HAZEL.
HAZEL   f   English
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HEADLEY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HEDLEY.
HEATH   m   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series 'The Big Valley'.
HEATHER   f   English
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather... [more]
HEAVEN   f   English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess"... [more]
HEDLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HEIDI   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri... [more]
HELEN   f   English, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon"... [more]
HELLEN   f   English
Variant of HELEN.
HENDERSON   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "son of HENRY".
HENRIETTA   f   English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form which was initially more popular.
HENRY   m   English
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler"... [more]
HEPSIE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of HEPHZIBAH.
HERB   m   English
Short form of HERBERT.
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright"... [more]
HERBIE   m   English
Diminutive of HERBERT.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man"... [more]
HERVEY   m   English
Variant of HARVEY.
HESTER   f   English, Biblical Latin
Latin form of ESTHER. Like Esther, it has been used in England since the Protestant Reformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne used it for the heroine of his novel 'The Scarlet Letter' (1850), Hester Prynne.
HETTIE   f   English
Diminutive of HENRIETTA or HESTER.
HEWIE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUGHIE.
HILARY   f & m   English
Medieval English form of HILARIUS or HILARIA. During the Middle Ages it was primarily a masculine name... [more]
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names... [more]
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel"... [more]
HILLARY   f   English
Variant of HILARY. A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first man to climb Mount Everest.
HIRAM   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Probably of Phoenician origin, though it could be from Hebrew meaning "exalted brother". This was the name of a king of Tyre in the Old Testament. As an English given name, Hiram came into use after the Protestant Reformation... [more]
HOLDEN   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel 'The Catcher in the Rye' (1951), Holden Caufield.
HOLLIE   f   English
Variant of HOLLY.
HOLLIS   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
HOLLY   f   English
From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.
HOMER   m   English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge"... [more]
HONEY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
HONOR   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HONOUR, using the American spelling.
HONORA   f   Irish, English
Variant of HONORIA. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.
HONOUR   f   English (Rare)
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of HONORIA or HONORATA, which are ultimately derived from the same source.
HOPE   f   English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
HORACE   m   English, French
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages... [more]
HORATIO   m   English
Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed... [more]
HORTENSE   f   French, English
French form of HORTENSIA.
HOWARD   m   English
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder"... [more]
HOWIE   m   English
Diminutive of HOWARD.
HOYT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English hoit "stick", originally a nickname for a thin person.
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright"... [more]
HUDSON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
HUEY   m   English
Variant of HUGHIE.
HUGH   m   English
From the Germanic element hug, meaning "heart, mind, spirit". It was common among Frankish and French nobility, being borne by Hugh Capet, a 10th-century king of France who founded the Capetian dynasty... [more]
HUGHIE   m   English
Diminutive of HUGH.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright"... [more]
HUMPHREY   m   English
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace"... [more]
HUMPHRY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HUMPHREY.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
HYACINTH (2)   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone which also bears this name), ultimately from Greek ‘υακινθος (hyakinthos).
HYLDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HILDA.
HYRAM   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HIRAM.
HYRUM   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HIRAM. This name was borne by Hyrum Smith (1800-1844), an early leader within the Mormon church.
IAN   m   Scottish, English
Scottish form of JOHN.
IBBIE   f   English
Diminutive of ISABEL.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages... [more]
IDELLA   f   English
Elaboration of IDA.
IDELLE   f   English (Rare)
Elaboration of IDA.
IDONEA   f   English (Archaic)
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of IÐUNN. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable"... [more]
IDONY   f   English (Archaic)
Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA.
IGGY   m   English
Diminutive of IGNATIUS.
IKE   m   English
Diminutive of ISAAC. This was the nickname of the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), based on the initial sound of his surname.
ILBERT   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name HILDEBERT.
ILEAN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EILEEN.
ILEEN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EILEEN.
ILENE   f   English
Variant of EILEEN, probably inspired by the spelling of Irene.
IMOGEN   f   English (British)
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected... [more]
IMOGENE   f   English
Variant of IMOGEN.
INA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Limburgish, Croatian
Short form of names ending with ina.
INDIA   f   English
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
INDIANA   f & m   English
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the 'Indiana Jones' series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
INDIGO   f & m   English (Rare)
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ινδικον (Indikon) "Indic, from India".
INEZ   f   English
English form of INÉS.
INGRAM   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Norman French given name ENGUERRAND.
INIGO   m   English (Rare)
English form of ÍÑIGO. It became well-known in Britain due to the 17th-century English architect Inigo Jones... [more]
IOLA   f   English
Probably a variant of IOLE.
IONA (1)   f   English, Scottish
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
IONE   f   Greek Mythology, English
From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower"... [more]
IRA (1)   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation... [more]
IRELAND   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
IRIS   f   Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRMA   f   German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to EMMA... [more]
IRVIN   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRVINE   m   English, Scottish
Variant of IRVING.
IRVING   m   English, Scottish, Jewish
From a Scottish surname which was in turn derived from a Scottish place name meaning "green water". Historically this name has been relatively common among Jews, who have used it as an American-sounding form of Hebrew names beginning with I such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah... [more]
IRWIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
ISAAC   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh"... [more]
ISABEL   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century... [more]
ISABELLA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).
ISABELLE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of ISABEL.
ISADOR   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ISIDORE.
ISADORA   f   English
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).
ISADORE   m   English
Variant of ISIDORE.
ISAIAH   m   English, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְשַׁעְיָהוּ (Yesha'yahu) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation"... [more]
ISBEL   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ISABEL.
ISEBELLA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ISABELLA.
ISIAH   m   English
Variant of ISAIAH.
ISIDORA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
ISIDORE   m   English, French, Georgian, Jewish
From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift"... [more]
ISOLDE   f   English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle"... [more]
ISRAEL   m   Jewish, English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contended"... [more]
ISSAC   m   English
Variant of ISAAC.
ISSY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ISIDORE, ISABELLA and other names beginning with Is.
IVAN   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN)... [more]
IVONETTE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of YVONNE.
IVOR   m   Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior"... [more]
IVY   f   English
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
IZABELLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ISABEL.
IZZY   m & f   English
Diminutive of ISIDORE, ISABEL, ISRAEL, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
JACE   m   English
Short form of JASON.
JACI   f   English
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JACINDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JACINTA.
JACINTH   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the orange precious stone, originating from the same source as Hyacinth.
JACK   m   English
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name... [more]
JACKI   f   English
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JACKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JACKLYN   f   English
Variant of JACQUELINE.
JACKSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
JACLYN   f   English
Contracted variant of JACQUELINE.
JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov)... [more]
JACQUELINE   f   French, English
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JACQUELYN   f   English
Variant of JACQUELINE.
JACQUETTA   f   English (British)
Feminine diminutive of JACQUES.
JACQUI   f   English (British)
Short form of JACQUELINE.
JADA (1)   f   English
Possibly an elaborated form of JADE. This name came into general use in the 1960s, and was popularized in the 1990s by actress Jada Pinkett Smith (1971-).
JADE   f   English, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic... [more]
JADEN   m & f   English (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan... [more]
JADYN   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of JAY (1).
JAIDA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADA (1).
JAIDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAIME (2)   f   English
Variant of JAMIE. The character Jaime Sommers from the television series 'The Bionic Woman' (1976-1978) helped to popularize the name... [more]
JAIMIE   f   English
Variant of JAMIE.
JAKE   m   English
Medieval variant of JACK. It is also sometimes used as a short form of JACOB.
JAKI   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JAKKI   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of JACQUELINE.
JAMES   m   English, Biblical
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB)... [more]
JAMESON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".
JAMEY   m   English
Diminutive of JAMES.
JAMI (1)   f   English
Variant of JAMIE.
JAMIE   m & f   Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of JAMES. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
JAMISON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".
JAN (2)   f   English
Short form of JANET, JANICE, and other names beginning with Jan.
JANAE   f   English (Modern)
Elaborated form of JANE.
JANCIS   f   English (Rare)
Combination of JAN (2) and FRANCIS.
JANE   f   English
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan... [more]
JANEKA   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of JANE.
JANEL   f   English
Variant of JANELLE.
JANELE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JANELLE.
JANELLA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JANELLE.
JANELLE   f   English
Diminutive of JANE. It has been in use only since the 20th century.
JANENE   f   English
Variant of JANINE.
JANESSA   f   English (Modern)
Elaborated form of JANE, influenced by VANESSA.
JANET   f   English
Medieval diminutive of JANE.
JANETTA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of JANET.
JANETTE   f   English
Variant of JANET.
JANEY   f   English
Diminutive of JANE.
JANICE   f   English
Elaborated form of JANE, created by Paul Leicester Ford for his novel 'Janice Meredith' (1899).
JANIE   f   English
Diminutive of JANE.
JANINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
Variant of JEANNINE. It has only been in use since the 20th century.
JANIS   f   English
Variant of JANICE.
JANNA   f   Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of JAN (1). As an English name, it is an elaboration of JAN (2).
JANNAH   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JANNA, influenced by HANNAH.
JANNETTE   f   English
Variant of JANET.
JANNINE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JANINE.
JARED   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent"... [more]
JAROD   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JARON (2)   m   English (Modern)
Invented name, probably based on JARED and DARREN.
JARRED   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JARRETT   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.
JARROD   m   English
Variant of JARED.
JARVIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name GERVAIS.
JASLYN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JAZLYN.
JASMIN (1)   f   German, English
German form and English variant of JASMINE.
JASMINE   f   English, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JASMYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JASMINE.
JASON   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal"... [more]
JASPER   m   English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus... [more]
JAXON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JACKSON.
JAXSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JACKSON.
JAY (1)   m   English
Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.
JAYCE   m   English
Short form of JASON.
JAYCOB   m   English (Rare)
Variant of JACOB.
JAYDA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADA (1).
JAYDE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADE.
JAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYDON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYE   f   English
Feminine variant of JAY (1).
JAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Combination of JAY (1) and the popular name suffix la.
JAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Combination of JAY (1) and LEE.
JAYLEN   m & f   African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JAYLENE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine elaboration of JAY (1) using the popular suffix lene.
JAYLIN   m & f   African American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
JAYLYN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine elaboration of JAY (1) using the popular suffix lyn.
JAYMA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JAMIE.
JAYME   f   English
Variant of JAMIE.
JAYMES   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JAMES.
JAYNA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JANE.
JAYNE   f   English
Variant of JANE.
JAYNIE   f   English
Diminutive of JAYNE.
JAYSON   m   English
Variant of JASON.
JAZLYN   f   English (Modern)
Modern name, a combination of the popular name elements Jaz and lyn.
JAZMIN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JASMINE.
JAZMINE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JASMINE.
JAZMYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JASMINE.
JEAN (2)   f   English, Scottish
Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see JANE). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England... [more]
JEANA   f   English
Variant of JEAN (2).
JEANE   f   English
Variant of JEAN (2).
JEANIE   f   English
Diminutive of JEAN (2).
JEANINE   f   French, English, Dutch
Variant of JEANNINE.
JEANNA   f   English
Variant of JEAN (2).
JEANNE   f   French, English
Modern French form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Joan of Arc is known as Jeanne d'Arc in France.
JEANNETTE   f   French, English, Dutch
French diminutive of JEANNE.
JEANNIE   f   English
Diminutive of JEANNE.
JEANNINE   f   French, English
Diminutive of JEANNE.
JEB   m   English
Sometimes a diminutive of JACOB. This name may have also resulted from a nickname of James Ewell Brown Stuart (1833-1864), a Confederate general in the American Civil War, which was formed from the initial letters of his three given names.
JED   m   English
Short form of JEDIDIAH.
JEFF   m   English
Short form of JEFFREY.
JEFFERSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JEFFREY". It is usually given in honour of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the United States and the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.
JEFFERY   m   English
Variant of JEFFREY.
JEFFREY   m   English
Medieval variant of GEOFFREY. In America, Jeffrey has been more common than Geoffrey, though this is not true in Britain.
JEFFRY   m   English
Variant of JEFFREY.
JEM   m   English
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JEMIMA   f   Biblical, English
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JEMMA   f   English (British)
Variant of GEMMA.
JEMMY   m   English
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JEN   f   English
Short form of JENNIFER.
JENA   f   English
Diminutive of JENNIFER.
JENAE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of JENNIFER.
JENELLE   f   English
Combination of JEN and the popular name suffix elle.
JENESSA   f   English (Rare)
Combination of JEN and the popular name suffix essa.
JENI   f   English (Modern)
Variant of JENNY.
JENIFER   f   English, Cornish
Variant of JENNIFER.
JENN   f   English
Short form of JENNIFER.
JENNA (1)   f   English
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series 'Dallas'.
JENNI (2)   f   English
Variant of JENNY.
JENNICA   f   English (Rare)
Combination of JENNIFER and JESSICA.
JENNIE   f   English, Swedish
Variant of JENNY. Before the 20th century this spelling was more common.
JENNIFER   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).
JENNY   f   English, Swedish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JEP   m   English (Archaic)
Medieval diminutive of GEOFFREY.
JEPSON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of JEP".


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