English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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JEMIMAfBiblical, English
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JEMMYmEnglish
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JENfEnglish
Short form of JENNIFER.
JENAfEnglish
Diminutive of JENNIFER.
JENELLEfEnglish
Combination of JEN and the popular name suffix elle.
JENESSAfEnglish (Rare)
Combination of JEN and the popular name suffix essa.
JENNfEnglish
Short form of JENNIFER.
JENNAfEnglish, Finnish
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series 'Dallas'.
JENNIEfEnglish, Swedish
Variant of JENNY. Before the 20th century this spelling was more common.
JENNIFERfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).
JENNYfEnglish, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JEPmEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval diminutive of GEOFFREY.
JEPSONmEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of JEP".
JERALDmEnglish
Variant of GERALD.
JEREmFinnish, Croatian, English
Finnish diminutive of JEREMIAS (usually used independently), as well as a Croatian diminutive of JERONIM and an English diminutive of JERALD or JEREMIAH.
JEREMIAHmEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH will exalt", from the roots רוּם (rum) meaning "to exalt" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.... [more]
JEREMYmEnglish, Biblical
Medieval English form of JEREMIAH, and the form used in some English versions of the New Testament.
JERIfEnglish
Variant of JERRY.
JERICHOmEnglish (Modern)
From the name of a city in Israel which is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".
JERMAINEmEnglish
Variant of GERMAIN. The name was popularized in the 1970s by Jermaine Jackson (1954-), a member of the singing group The Jackson 5.
JEROLDmEnglish
Variant of GERALD.
JEROMEmEnglish
From the Greek name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name", derived from ‘ιερος (hieros) "sacred" and ονομα (onoma) "name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century.
JERRIfEnglish
Variant of JERRY.
JERRIEfEnglish
Variant of JERRY.
JERRODmEnglish
Variant of JARED.
JERRYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JEREMY, JEROME, GERALD, GERALDINE, and other names beginning with the same sound. A notable bearer was American comedian Jerry Lewis (1926-2017).
JERVISmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of JARVIS.
JESSm & fEnglish
Short form of JESSE or JESSICA.
JESSAfEnglish
Diminutive of JESSICA.
JESSALYNfEnglish (Rare)
Combination of JESSIE (1) and the popular name suffix lyn.
JESSAMINEfEnglish (Rare)
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JESSEmEnglish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JESSICAfEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JESSIE (1)fScottish, English
Originally a Scottish diminutive of JEAN (2). In modern times it is also used as a diminutive of JESSICA.
JESSIKAfGerman, English (Modern)
German and English variant of JESSICA.
JETTmEnglish (Modern)
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).
JEWELf & mEnglish
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JEWELLf & mEnglish
Variant of JEWEL.
JILLfEnglish
Short form of GILLIAN.
JILLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of JILL.
JILLYfEnglish
Diminutive of JILL.
JIMmEnglish
Medieval diminutive of JAMES.
JIMImEnglish
Diminutive of JAMES. A famous bearer was the rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
JIMMIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive or feminine form of JAMES.
JIMMYmEnglish
Diminutive of JAMES.
JINNYfEnglish
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
JOf & mEnglish, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German and Dutch, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOAN (1)fEnglish
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century.... [more]
JOANIEfEnglish
Diminutive of JOAN (1).
JOANNAfEnglish, Polish, Biblical
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
JOBETHfEnglish (Rare)
Combination of JO and BETH.
JOBYmEnglish (Rare)
Diminutive of JOB.
JOCELYNf & mEnglish, French
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Goths, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JODENEfEnglish (Rare)
Feminine elaboration of JODY.
JODIfEnglish
Feminine variant of JODY.
JODIEfEnglish
Feminine variant of JODY.
JODYf & mEnglish
Probably either a variant of JUDY or a diminutive of JOSEPH. It was popularized by the young hero in Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' novel 'The Yearling' (1938) and the subsequent film adaptation (1946).
JOEmEnglish
Short form of JOSEPH. Five famous sports figures who have had this name are boxers Joe Louis (1914-1981) and Joe Frazier (1944-), baseball player Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), and football quarterbacks Joe Namath (1943-) and Joe Montana (1956-).
JOELmEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOELLAfEnglish
Feminine form of JOEL.
JOELLEfEnglish
Feminine form of JOEL.
JOETTAfEnglish
Elaborated form of JO.
JOEYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JOHNmEnglish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.... [more]
JOHNAfEnglish (Rare)
Feminine form of JOHN.
JOHNIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JOHN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
JOHNNAfEnglish
Feminine form of JOHN.
JOHNNIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JOHN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
JOHNNYmEnglish
Diminutive of JOHN. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).
JOJOm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JOSEPH, JOLENE, and other names that begin with Jo.
JOLEENfEnglish
Variant of JOLENE.
JOLENEfEnglish
Formed from JO and the popular name suffix lene. This name was created in the 20th century.
JOLIEfEnglish
Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France.
JOLYONmEnglish (Rare)
Medieval form of JULIAN. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his 'Forsyte Saga' novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
JON (2)mEnglish
Short form of JONATHAN, or sometimes a variant of JOHN.
JONAHmEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
JONATHANmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JONELLEfEnglish (Rare)
Feminine form of JOHN.
JONETTEfEnglish (Rare)
Feminine diminutive of JON (1).
JONI (1)fEnglish
Diminutive of JOAN (1).
JONIEfEnglish
Diminutive of JOAN (1).
JONNYmEnglish
Diminutive of JONATHAN.
JONQUILfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, derived ultimately from Latin iuncus "reed".
JOOLSm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JULIAN or JULIA.
JORDANm & fEnglish, French, Macedonian
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
JORDONmEnglish
Variant of JORDAN.
JORDYNfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of JORDAN.
JORIEfEnglish
Short form of MARJORIE.
JOSEPHmEnglish, French, German, Biblical
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.... [more]
JOSEPHINAfEnglish (Rare)
Latinate variant of JOSÉPHINE.
JOSEPHINEfEnglish, German, Dutch
English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE.
JOSHmEnglish
Short form of JOSHUA.
JOSHUAmEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation", from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.... [more]
JOSIAHmBiblical, English
From the Hebrew name יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Yoshiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH supports". In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo in the 7th century BC. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
JOSIEfEnglish
Short form of JOSEPHINE.
JOSSf & mEnglish
Short form of JOCELYN.
JOURNEYfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word, derived via Old French from Latin diurnus "of the day".
JOYfEnglish
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JOYCEf & mEnglish
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
JOYEfEnglish
Variant of JOY.
JUDDmEnglish, Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of JORDAN. Modern use of this name is inspired by the surname that was derived from the medieval name.
JUDE (1)mEnglish, Biblical
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JUDE (2)fEnglish
Short form of JUDITH.
JUDIfEnglish
Diminutive of JUDITH.
JUDIEfEnglish
Diminutive of JUDITH.
JUDITHfEnglish, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "Jewish woman", feminine of יְהוּדִי (yehudi), ultimately referring to a person from the tribe of Judah. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
JUDYfEnglish
Diminutive of JUDITH. A well-known bearer of this name was singer and actress Judy Garland (1922-1969).
JULES (2)f & mEnglish
Diminutive of JULIA or JULIAN.
JULIAfEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIANmEnglish, Polish, German
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JULIANAfDutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIANNAfHungarian, Polish, English
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
JULIANNEfEnglish
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
JULIEfFrench, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JULIETfEnglish
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
JULIUSmAncient Roman, English, German
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.... [more]
JULYfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the month, which was originally named for Julius Caesar.
JULYANmEnglish (Rare)
Medieval variant of JULIAN.
JUNEfEnglish
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
JUNIORmEnglish
From a nickname which was originally used for a boy who had the same name as his father.
JUNIPERfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUSTICEm & fEnglish
From an occupational surname which meant "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
JUSTINmEnglish, French, Slovene
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century. Famous modern bearers include pop stars Justin Timberlake (1981-) and Justin Bieber (1994-).
JUSTINAfEnglish, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN).
JUSTINEfFrench, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
JUSTYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JUSTIN or JUSTINE.
KAETYfEnglish (Rare)
Diminutive of KATE.
KALEBmEnglish (Modern)
English variant of CALEB.
KAMRYNfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of CAMERON.
KANDIfEnglish
Variant of CANDY.
KAOLINmEnglish (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN. This is also the name of a type of clay.
KARA (1)fEnglish
Variant of CARA.
KAREN (1)fDanish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, English
Danish short form of KATHERINE. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
KARENAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaboration of KAREN (1), possibly influenced by CARINA (1).
KARLmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KARRIEfEnglish
Variant of CARRIE.
KASANDRAfEnglish (Modern), Polish
English variant and Polish form of CASSANDRA.
KASEYm & fEnglish
Variant of CASEY.
KASSANDRAfGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek, English (Modern)
Greek form of CASSANDRA, as well as a modern English variant.
KATfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATEfEnglish, Croatian
Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
KATEEfEnglish (Rare)
Diminutive of KATE.
KATEYfEnglish
Diminutive of KATE.
KATHARINEfEnglish, German
English variant of KATHERINE and German variant of KATHARINA. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).
KATHERINAfEnglish (Rare), German
Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).
KATHERINEfEnglish
From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αικια (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρος (katharos) "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.... [more]
KATHIfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATHIEfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATHLEENfIrish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
KATHLYNfEnglish
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
KATHRYNfEnglish
Contracted form of KATHERINE.
KATHYfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATIEfEnglish
Diminutive of KATE.
KATRINAfEnglish, German, Swedish, Dutch
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.
KATYfEnglish
Diminutive of KATE.
KAY (1)fEnglish
Short form of KATHERINE and other names beginning with K.
KAYCEEfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of CASEY.
KAYEfEnglish
Variant of KAY (1).
KAYLAfEnglish
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix la. Use of the name was greatly increased in the 1980s after the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera 'Days of Our Lives'.
KAYLEEfEnglish (Modern)
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lee.
KAYLEENfEnglish (Modern)
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix leen.
KAYLEIGHfEnglish (Modern)
Variant of KAYLEE. This is also a common Anglicized form of the Gaelic word ceilidh, a traditional social gathering and dance.
KAYLYNfEnglish (Modern)
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lyn.
KEANNAfEnglish (Modern)
Combination of the popular name prefix Ke and ANNA.
KEATONmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "shed town" in Old English.
KEEFEmIrish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh meaning "descendant of CAOMH".
KEEGANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
KEELYfEnglish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".
KEIGHLEYfEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an English place name, ultimately meaning "clearing belonging to Cyhha". The Old English given name Cyhha is of unknown meaning. This name also serves as a variant of KAYLEE.
KEIRmScottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of KERR.
KEIRAfEnglish (Modern)
Variant of CIARA (1). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
KEITHmEnglish, Scottish
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KELDAfEnglish (Rare)
Possibly derived from Old Norse kildr meaning "a spring".
KELIAfEnglish (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name.
KELLEYf & mEnglish
Variant of KELLY.
KELLIfEnglish
Variant of KELLY.
KELLIEfEnglish
Variant of KELLY.
KELLYm & fIrish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KELSEYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KELVINmEnglish
From the name of a Scottish river, perhaps meaning "narrow water". As a title it was borne by the Irish-Scottish physicist William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), who acquired his title from the river.
KEMPmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
KEN (1)mEnglish
Short form of KENNETH.
KENDALm & fEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of KENDALL.
KENDALLm & fEnglish
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENDRAfEnglish
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.
KENDRICKmEnglish
From a surname which has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENELMmEnglish (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KENNARDmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KENNEDYf & mEnglish, Irish
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).
KENNETHmScottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KENNYmScottish, English
Diminutive of KENNETH.