English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
There are 3,870 names matching your criteria. This is page 5.

EPPIE   f   English (Archaic)
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA or HEPHZIBAH.
ERIC   m   English, Swedish, German, Spanish
From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler"... [more]
ERICA   f   English, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ERICK   m   English
Variant of ERIC.
ERICKA   f   English
Variant of ERICA.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERIN   f   English, Irish
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
ERLE (2)   m   English
Variant of EARL.
ERMA   f   English
Variant of IRMA. It began to be used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century, along with Irma.
ERMINTRUDE   f   English (Archaic)
English form of ERMENDRUD. It was occasionally used until the 19th century.
ERN   m   English
Short form of ERNEST.
ERNEST   m   English, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century... [more]
ERNESTINE   f   French, German, English
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERNIE   m   English
Diminutive of ERNEST.
ERROL   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name. It was popularized as a given name by the Australian actor Errol Flynn (1909-1959).
ERSKINE   m   Scottish, Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of a Scottish town meaning "projecting height" in Gaelic. A famous bearer of the name was the Irish novelist and nationalist Erskine Childers (1870-1922).
ERYKAH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERICA.
ERYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ERIN.
ESME   m & f   English
Variant of ESMÉ.
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
ESMÉE   f   English, Dutch
Feminine form of ESMÉ.
ESMERALDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo... [more]
ESMOND   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection"... [more]
ESMUND   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ESMOND.
ESSENCE   f   English (Modern)
From the English word essence which means either "odour, scent" or else "fundamental quality". Ultimately it derives from Latin esse "to be".
ESSIE   f   English
Diminutive of ESTELLE or ESTHER.
ESTA   f   English
Diminutive of ESTHER.
ESTELLA   f   English
Latinate form of ESTELLE. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTELLE   f   English, French
From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR... [more]
ETHAN   m   English, Jewish, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm"... [more]
ETHEL   f   English
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived... [more]
ETHELBERT   m   English
Middle English form of ÆÐELBERHT. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELINDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelind, derived from the elements æðel "noble" and lindi "snake"... [more]
ETHELRED   m   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of ÆÐELRÆD. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELYN   f   English
Diminutive of ETHEL.
ETTA   f   English
Short form of HENRIETTA and other names that end with etta. A famous bearer was the American singer Etta James (1938-2012), who took her stage name from her real given name Jamesetta.
ETTIE   f   English
Diminutive of HENRIETTA and other names ending with etta or ette.
EUGENE   m   English
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευγενιος (Eugenios) which was derived from the Greek word ευγενης (eugenes) meaning "well born"... [more]
EUGENIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man... [more]
EULA   f   English
Short form of EULALIA.
EULALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) "good" and λαλεω (laleo) "to talk"... [more]
EUNICE   f   Biblical, English, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευνικη (Eunike) which meant "good victory" from ευ (eu) "good" and νικη (nike) "victory"... [more]
EUPHEMIA   f   Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare"... [more]
EUSTACE   m   English
English form of EUSTACHIUS or EUSTATHIUS, two names of Greek origin which have been conflated in the post-classical period... [more]
EUSTACIA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of EUSTACE.
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament... [more]
EVALINE   f   English
Variant of EVELYN.
EVALYN   f   English
Variant of EVELYN.
EVAN   m   Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.
EVANDER (2)   m   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of IOMHAR.
EVANGELINA   f   Spanish, English
Latinate form of EVANGELINE.
EVANGELINE   f   English
Means "good news" from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message"... [more]
EVE   f   English, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live"... [more]
EVELEEN   f   English (Rare)
Either a diminutive of EVE or a variant of EVELYN.
EVELINA   f   English, Italian, Swedish
Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel 'Evelina' (1778)... [more]
EVELINE   f   English, French, Dutch
Variant of EVELINA.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
EVERARD   m   English (Rare)
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy"... [more]
EVERETT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name EVERARD.
EVERETTE   m   English
Variant of EVERETT.
EVERITT   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EVERETT.
EVETTE   f   English
Variant of YVETTE.
EVIE   f   English
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
EVONNE   f   English
Variant of YVONNE.
EVVIE   f   English
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
EWART   m   English
From an English and Scottish surname which was either based on a Norman form of EDWARD, or else derived from a place name of unknown meaning.
EZEKIEL   m   Biblical, English
From the Hebrew name יְחֶזְקֵאל (Yechezqel) meaning "God strengthens"... [more]
EZRA   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation... [more]
FAE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FAITH   f   English
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
FAITHE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of FAITH.
FALLON   f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan". The given name Fallamhan meant "leader". It was popularized in the 1980s by a character on the soap opera 'Dynasty'.
FANCY   f   English (Rare)
From the English word fancy which means either "like, love, inclination" or "ornamental". It is derived from Middle English fantasie, which comes (via Norman French and Latin) from Greek φαινω (phaino) "to show, to appear".
FANNIE   f   English
Variant of FANNY.
FANNY   f   English, French, Spanish
Diminutive of FRANCES. In the English-speaking world this has been a vulgar slang word since the late 19th century, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
FARLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "fern clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of this name is Canadian author Farley Mowat (1921-).
FARON   m   English
From a French surname which was derived from the Germanic given name Faro.
FARRAN   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from Old French ferrant meaning "iron grey".
FARRELL   m   English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fearghail meaning "descendant of FEARGHAL".
FAWN   f   English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
FAY   f   English
Derived from Middle English faie meaning "fairy". It appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthurian legends in the name of Morgan le Fay. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century... [more]
FAYE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FELICIA   f   English, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of FELIX. In England, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
FELICITY   f   English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century... [more]
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul... [more]
FEMIE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.
FENTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "marsh town" in Old English.
FERDIE   m   English
Diminutive of FERDINAND.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave"... [more]
FERDY   m   English
Diminutive of FERDINAND.
FERN   f   English
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
FERNE   f   English
Variant of FERN.
FINLAY   m   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINLEY   m & f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINNEGAN   m   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN... [more]
FIONA   f   Scottish, English
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).
FITZ   m   English (Rare)
Short form of various given names which are derived from surnames beginning with Norman French fitz meaning "son of" (for example FITZROY).
FITZROY   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "son of the king" in Old French, originally given to illegitimate sons of monarchs.
FLANAGAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannagáin meaning "descendant of Flannagán". The given name Flannagán is derived from Irish flann "red" and a diminutive suffix.
FLANNERY   f & m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour"... [more]
FLETCHER   m   English
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.
FLEUR   f   French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLICK   f   English
Diminutive of FELICITY.
FLO   f   English
Short form of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FLOELLA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of FLO.
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France... [more]
FLORENCE   f & m   English, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages... [more]
FLORETTA   f   English, German (Rare)
Latinate diminutive of FLORA.
FLORRIE   f   English
Diminutive of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FLOSSIE   f   English
Diminutive of FLORENCE.
FLOWER   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word flower for the blossoming plant. It is derived (via Old French) from Latin flos.
FLOYD   m   English
Variant of LLOYD.
FLYNN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of FLANN".
FORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "ford" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
FOREST   m   English
Variant of FORREST, or else directly from the English word forest.
FORREST   m   English
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877)... [more]
FORTUNE   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word fortune, ultimately from Latin fortuna, a derivative of fors "luck".
FOSTER   m   English
From an English surname which has several different origins: see FOSTER (1), FOSTER (2), FOSTER (3) and FOSTER (4).
FOX   m   English (Rare)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FRAN   m & f   Spanish, English, Croatian, Slovene
Short form of FRANCIS, FRANCES or related names.
FRANCENE   f   English (Rare)
English variant of FRANCINE.
FRANCES   f   English
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century... [more]
FRANCINE   f   French, English
Feminine diminutive of FRANÇOIS.
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used... [more]
FRANK (1)   m   English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century... [more]
FRANK (2)   m   English
Short form of FRANCIS. The singer Frank Sinatra (1915-1998) was a famous bearer.
FRANKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.
FRANKLIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English frankelin "freeman". A famous bearer of the surname was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher... [more]
FRANKLYN   m   English
Variant of FRANKLIN.
FRANNIE   f   English
Diminutive of FRANCES.
FRANNY   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANCIS or FRANCES.
FRASER   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was Simon Fraser (1776-1862), a Canadian explorer.
FRAZIER   m   Scottish, English
Variant of FRASER.
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDA   f   English
Short form of names ending in freda or fred, such as WINIFRED or ALFREDA.
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
FREDDY   m   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK.
FREDERICA   f   Portuguese, English
Feminine form of FREDERICO or FREDERICK.
FREDERICK   m   English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power"... [more]
FREDRIC   m   English
Variant of FREDERICK.
FREDRICK   m   English
Variant of FREDERICK.
FREEMAN   m   English
From an English surname meaning "free man". It originally denoted a person who was not a serf.
FREIDA   f   English
Variant of FRIEDA.
FREYA   f   Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr... [more]
FRIEDA   f   German, English
Variant of FRIDA.
FRONA   f   English
Diminutive of SOPHRONIA.
FULK   m   English (Archaic)
From the Germanic name Fulco, a short form of various names beginning with the element fulc "people". The Normans brought this name to England, though it is now very rare.
FULKE   m   English (Archaic)
Variant of FULK.
FULTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "bird-catcher's town" in Old English.
GABBY   m & f   English
Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE.
GABE   m   English
Short form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLA   f   Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLE   f   French, English
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GAE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of GAY.
GAGE   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GAIL   f   English
Short form of ABIGAIL.
GAILA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of GAIL.
GALE (1)   f   English
Variant of GAIL.
GALE (2)   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English gaile "jovial".
GALEN   m   English
Modern form of the Greek name Γαληνος (Galenos), which meant "calm" from Greek γαληνη (galene)... [more]
GALLAGHER   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of GALLCHOBHAR".
GARDENIA   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
GARETH   m   Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain... [more]
GAREY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARFIELD   m   English
From a surname meaning "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881). It is now associated with the cat in Jim Davis's cartoon strip 'Garfield'.
GARLAND   m   English
From a surname meaning "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. The surname originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNET (1)   f   English
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GARNET (2)   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname which referred either to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or who sold pomegranates (Old French pome grenate).
GARNETT   m & f   English
Variant of GARNET (2).
GARRET   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.
GARRETT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GARRICK   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
GARRY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARTH   m   English
From a surname meaning "garden" in Old Norse, originally denoting one who lived near or worked in a garden.
GARY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear"... [more]
GAVIN   m   English, Scottish
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GAY   f   English
From the English word gay meaning "gay, happy". By the mid-20th century the word had acquired the additional meaning of "homosexual", and the name has subsequently dropped out of use.
GAYE (1)   f   English
Variant of GAY.
GAYELORD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GAYLORD.
GAYLA   f   English
Elaborated form of GAIL.
GAYLE   f & m   English
Variant of GAIL or GALE (2).
GAYLORD   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old French gaillard "high-spirited, boistrous". This name was rarely used after the mid-20th century, when the word gay acquired the slang meaning "homosexual".
GAYNOR   f   English (British)
Medieval form of GUINEVERE.
GAZ   m   English (British)
Diminutive of GARY or GARETH.
GEENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of GINA.
GEFFREY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GEOFFREY.
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GENA (1)   f   English
Variant of GINA.
GENE   m   English
Short form of EUGENE.
GENESIS   f   English (Modern)
Means "birth" in Greek. This is the name of the first book of the Old Testament in the Bible. It tells of the creation of the world, the expulsion of Adam and Eve, Noah and the great flood, and the three patriarchs.
GENETTE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of JEANETTE.
GENEVA   f   English
Possibly a shortened form of GENEVIEVE. It could also be inspired by the name of the city in Switzerland. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
GENEVIEVE   f   English
English form of GENEVIÈVE.
GENIE   f   English
Diminutive of EUGENIA.
GEOFF   m   English
Short form of GEOFFREY.
GEOFFREY   m   English, French
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage"... [more]
GEORDIE   m   English
Diminutive of GEORGE.
GEORGE   m   English, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work"... [more]
GEORGEANNA   f   English
Variant of GEORGIANA.
GEORGENE   f   English
Variant of GEORGINE.
GEORGIA   f   English, Greek
Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II... [more]
GEORGIANA   f   English
Feminine form of GEORGE. This form of the name has been in use since the 18th century.
GEORGIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of GEORGIA or GEORGE.
GEORGINA   f   English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Feminine form of GEORGE.
GERALD   m   English, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger "spear" and wald "rule"... [more]
GERALDINE   f   English
Feminine form of GERALD.
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy"... [more]
GERMAN (1)   m   English
English form of GERMANUS.
GERRARD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GERARD.
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GERTIE   f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDE   f   English, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength"... [more]
GERVASE   m   English (Rare)
English form of GERVASIUS. The Normans introduced this name to England in the Middle Ages, though it has since become rare.
GIB   m   English
Medieval diminutive of GILBERT.
GIDEON   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings... [more]
GIFFARD   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GEBHARD.
GIL (2)   m   English
Short form of GILBERT and other names beginning with Gil.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright"... [more]
GILES   m   English
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat"... [more]
GILL   f   English
Short form of GILLIAN.
GILLIAN   f   English
Medieval English feminine form of JULIAN. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century.
GINA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina... [more]
GINGER   f   English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GINNIE   f   English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GINNY   f   English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
GISELLE   f   French, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court... [more]
GISSELLE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of GISELLE.
GITHA   f   English (Archaic)
Variant of GYTHA.
GLADWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLADYS   f   Welsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA... [more]
GLANVILLE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman place name which possibly meant "domain of (a person named) Gland" in Old French.
GLEN   m   Scottish, English
Variant of GLENN.
GLENDA   f   Welsh, English
A name created in the 20th century from the Welsh elements glân "pure, clean" and da "good".
GLENN   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname is American astronaut John Glenn (1921-).
GLENNA   f   Scottish, English
Feminine form of GLENN.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898)... [more]
GLORIANA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
GLORY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
GODDARD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GODEHARD.
GODFREY   m   English
From the Germanic name Godafrid, which meant "peace of god" from the Germanic elements god "god" and frid "peace"... [more]
GOLDIE (1)   f   English
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
GOODWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the given name GODWINE.
GORD   m   English
Short form of GORDON.
GORDEN   m   English
Variant of GORDON.
GORDIE   m   English
Diminutive of GORDON. A famous bearer was Canadian hockey star Gordie Howe (1928-2016).
GORDON   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GORDY   m   English
Diminutive of GORDON.
GORE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "triangular" (from Old English gara), originally referring to someone who lived on a triangular piece of land. A famous bearer is American writer Gore Vidal (1925-).
GOSSE   m   English (Rare), Medieval French
From an English and French surname which was originally derived from the Norman given name Gosse, a diminutive of the Germanic name GOZZO.
GRACE   f   English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans... [more]
GRACELYN   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of GRACE using the popular name suffix lyn.
GRACIE   f   English
Diminutive of GRACE.
GRADY   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.
GRAEME   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRAHAM   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham... [more]
GRAHAME   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRANT   m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president... [more]
GRANVILLE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman place name GRAINVILLE.
GRAY   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GRAYSON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
GREER   f & m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GREG   m   English
Short form of GREGORY.
GREGG   m   English
Short form of GREGORY.
GREGORY   m   English
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert"... [more]
GRENVILLE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRANVILLE.
GRESHAM   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "grazing homestead" in Old English.
GRETA   f   Swedish, German, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETCHEN   f   German, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GRETTA   f   English
Variant of GRETA.
GREY   m & f   English (Rare)
Variant of GRAY.
GREYSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of GRAYSON.
GRIER   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GREER.
GRIFFIN   m   English
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GRISELDA   f   English, Scottish, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle"... [more]
GROSVENOR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "great hunter" in Norman French.
GROVER   m   English
From a surname meaning "grove of trees" from Old English graf. A famous bearer was the American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), who popularized the name in the United States at the end of the 19th century... [more]
GUS (1)   m   English, Scottish
Short form of AUGUSTUS or ANGUS.
GUSSIE   f   English
Diminutive of AUGUSTA.
GUY   m   English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament... [more]
GWEN   f   Welsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of GWENDOLEN, GWENLLIAN, and other names beginning with Gwen.
GWENDA   f   Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen "white, fair, blessed" and da "good". This name was created in the 20th century.
GWENDOLYN   f   Welsh, English
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
GWYNETH   f   Welsh, English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of GWYNEDD or a form of Welsh gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It has been common in Wales since the 19th century.
GYLES   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GILES.
GYPSY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.
GYTHA   f   English (Archaic)
From Gyða, an Old Norse diminutive of GUÐRÍÐR. It was borne by a Danish noblewoman who married the English lord Godwin of Wessex in the 11th century... [more]
HADLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
HADYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HAYDEN.
HAILEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAILEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.


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