Old Norse Origin Names

This is a list of names in which the origin is Old Norse. Old Norse was the North Germanic language spoken by the peoples of ancient Scandinavia.
gender
usage
origin
Oden m Norse Mythology
Swedish form of Odin.
Odin m Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr meaning "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe, though he is best known from Norse sources.... [more]
Oili f Finnish
Finnish form of Olga.
Ola 1 m Norwegian, Swedish
Norwegian and Swedish short form of Olaf.
Olaf m Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
Ólafur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Olaf.
Ólaug f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Olaug.
Olaug f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ólaug, derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
Olav m Norwegian, Danish
Variant of Olaf.
Olavi m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of Olaf.
Olavo m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Olaf.
Ólavur m Faroese
Faroese form of Olaf.
Ole m Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Olaf.
Oleg m Russian
Russian form of Helge. The Varangians brought this name from Scandinavia to Russia. It was borne by an important 10th-century grand prince of Kiev.
Oļegs m Latvian
Latvian form of Oleg.
Oleh m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of Oleg.
Olev m Estonian
Estonian form of Olaf.
Oľga f Slovak
Slovak form of Olga.
Olga f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of Helga. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
Olgica f Macedonian, Serbian
Macedonian and Serbian diminutive of Olga.
Olha f Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of Olga.
Oli m English
Short form of Oliver.
Oline f Norwegian, Danish
Feminine form of Ole.
Olivér m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Oliver.
Oliver m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
Olivette f Literature
Feminine form of Oliver. This was the name of the title character in the French opera Les noces d'Olivette (1879) by Edmond Audran.
Olívia f Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of Olivia.
Olivia f English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
Olivie f Czech
Czech form of Olivia.
Olivier m French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of Oliver. This is also the French word meaning "olive tree".
Oliviero m Italian
Italian form of Oliver.
Oliwer m Polish
Polish form of Oliver.
Oliwia f Polish
Polish form of Olivia.
Oliwier m Polish
Polish form of Oliver.
Olja f Serbian
Serbian diminutive of Olga.
Olle m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of Olaf or Oliver.
Olli m Finnish
Finnish variant of Olavi, based on Swedish Olle.
Ollie m & f English
Diminutive of Oliver, Olivia or Olive.
Olly m English
Diminutive of Oliver.
Ólöf f Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of Olaf.
Olof m Swedish
Swedish form of Olaf.
Olov m Swedish
Swedish form of Olaf.
Oluf m Danish
Danish variant of Olaf.
Olve m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ǫlvir, possibly derived from ala "all" or alu "defense, protection, luck" combined with vér "holy man" or "warrior".
Ölvir m Icelandic (Rare)
Icelandic form of Olve.
Ǫlvir m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Olve.
Olya f Russian
Diminutive of Olga.
Ǫrvar m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Orvar.
Orvar m Swedish (Rare), Norse Mythology
Means "arrow" in Old Norse. Orvar Odd is a legendary Norse hero who is the subject of a 13th-century Icelandic saga.
Osborn m English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjǫrn used in England, and after the Norman Conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
Osborne m English
From a surname that was a variant of Osborn.
Osbourne m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of Osborn.
Óscar m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Oscar.
Òscar m Catalan
Catalan form of Oscar.
Oscar m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name Osgar or its Old Norse cognate Ásgeirr, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
Óskar m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Oscar.
Oskar m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of Oscar. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who is credited for saved over 1,000 Polish Jews during World War II.
Oskari m Finnish
Finnish form of Oscar.
Oskars m Latvian
Latvian form of Oscar.
Osku m Finnish
Short form of Oskari.
Osmond m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
Östen m Swedish
Swedish form of Eysteinn.
Osvald m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian cognate of Oswald.
Oszkár m Hungarian
Hungarian form of Oscar.
Óðinn m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Odin.
Ove m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Probably a modern form of the Old Danish name Aghi, originally a short form of names that contain the Old Norse element egg "edge of a sword" or agi "terror".
Øydis f Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian form of Eydís.
Øystein m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Eysteinn.
Øyvind m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Eyvindr, which was derived from ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and vindr possibly meaning "victor".
Oz 1 m English
Short form of Oswald, Osborn and other names beginning with a similar sound.
Ozzie m English
Diminutive of Oswald, Osborn and other names beginning with a similar sound.
Ozzy m English
Variant of Ozzie.
Piret f Estonian
Estonian form of Birgitta.
Piritta f Finnish
Finnish form of Birgitta.
Pirjo f Finnish
Finnish diminutive of Piritta.
Pirkko f Finnish
Finnish diminutive of Piritta.
Priita f Finnish (Rare)
Finnish form of Brita.
Rafe m English
Variant of Ralph. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
Raghnaid f Scottish
Scottish form of Ragnhild.
Raghnailt f Irish
Irish form of Ragnhild.
Raghnall m Irish, Scottish
Gaelic form of Ragnvald.
Ragna f Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Ancient Scandinavian
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element regin "advice, counsel".
Ragnar m Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Estonian
Scandinavian cognate of Rayner.
Ragnarr m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of Raganhar.
Ragnbjǫrg f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Ragnheiðr f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "bright advice", derived from the elements regin "advice, counsel" and heiðr "brightness".
Ragnheiður f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Ragnheiðr.
Ragnhild f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ragnhildr, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and hildr "battle".
Ragnhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Ragnhild.
Ragnvald m Norwegian, Swedish
Modern Scandinavian form of Ragnvaldr.
Ragnvaldr m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "power, ruler" (making it a cognate of Reynold).
Ralph m English, German, Swedish
Contracted form of the Old Norse name Ráðúlfr (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman Conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
Ralphie m English
Diminutive of Ralph.
Randal m English
Variant of Randall.
Randall m English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Randel.
Randel m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Randolf and other names beginning with the Germanic element rand meaning "rim (of a shield)".
Randell m English
Variant of Randall.
Randi 2 f Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of the Old Norse name Ragnfríðr, which was derived from regin "advice, counsel" and fríðr "beautiful".
Randolf m English
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
Randolph m English
Variant of Randolf. This spelling was adopted in the 18th century.
Randy m & f English
Diminutive of Randall, Randolf or Miranda.
Ranulf m Scottish
Scottish form of the Old Norse name Randúlfr, a cognate of Randolf. Scandinavian settlers and invaders introduced this name to Scotland in the Middle Ages.
Ranulph m Scottish
Variant of Ranulf.
Ráðúlfr m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Norse elements ráð meaning "counsel" and úlfr meaning "wolf".
Reidar m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hreiðarr, which was derived from the elements hreiðr "nest, home" and arr "warrior".
Reidun f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hreiðunn, which was derived from the elements hreiðr "nest, home" and unnr "to wave, to billow".
Riitta f Finnish
Finnish short form of Piritta.
Roald m Norwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen (1872-1928) and the British children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990), who was born to Norwegian parents.
Roar m Norwegian
Modern Norwegian form of Hróarr.
Roffe m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of Rolf.
Rolf m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
Rollo m English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of Rolf. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
Ron 1 m English
Short form of Ronald.
Ronald m Scottish, English, Dutch, German
Scottish form of Ragnvaldr, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004). It is also associated with Ronald McDonald, the clown mascot for the McDonald's chain of restaurants, who first appeared in 1963.
Ronalda f Scottish
Feminine form of Ronald.
Ronaldo m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Ronald. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.
Ronnette f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Ronald.
Ronnie m & f English
Diminutive of Ronald or Veronica.
Ronny m English
Diminutive of Ronald.
Roul m Medieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of Rolf.
Ruarc m Irish
Probably an Irish form of Hrœrekr, introduced by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. Alternatively it may be derived from Irish ruarc "squall, rainstorm".
Rúna f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse, Icelandic and Faroese feminine form of Rune.
Runa f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Feminine form of Rune.
Rúnar m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Runar.
Runar m Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements rún "secret lore" and arr "warrior". This name did not exist in Old Norse, but was created in the modern era.
Rune m Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
Rúni m Ancient Scandinavian, Faroese
Old Norse and Faroese form of Rune.
Rurik m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of the Old Norse name Hrœrekr.
Sága f Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Saga.
Saga f Norse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
From Old Norse Sága, possibly meaning "seeing one", derived from sjá "to see". This is the name of a Norse goddess, possibly connected to Frigg. As a Swedish and Icelandic name, it is also derived from the unrelated word saga meaning "story, fairy tale, saga".
Saldís f Ancient Scandinavian
From the Old Norse elements salr "room, hall" and dís "goddess".
Sassa f Swedish (Rare)
Swedish diminutive of Astrid, Alexandra or Sara.
Selby m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
Shelby m & f English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of Selby. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie The Woman in Red (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie Steel Magnolias (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.
Sif f Norse Mythology, Danish, Icelandic
Old Norse, Danish and Icelandic form of Siv.
Sigfrid 2 f Norwegian
Norwegian variant of Sigrid.
Sigge m Swedish
Diminutive of Sigurd, Sigfrid 1, and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
Sigmund m German, Norwegian, English, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In the Norse Völsungasaga this is the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
Sigmundur m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Sigmund.
Signe f Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Estonian, Latvian
Modern Scandinavian form of Signý.
Signy f Norwegian
Norwegian variant form of Signý.
Signý f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name that was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and nýr "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
Sigrid f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
Sigrún f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Sigrun f Norwegian, German
Norwegian form of Sigrún.
Sigurd m Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the Völsungasaga, which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
Sigurður m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Sigurd.
Siiri f Estonian, Finnish
Estonian and Finnish diminutive of Sigrid.
Sindre m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Sindri.
Sindri m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "sparkle" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf, also named Eitri. With his brother Brokkr he made several magical items for the gods, including Odin's ring Draupnir and Thor's hammer Mjölnir.
Siri f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of Sigrid.
Siv f Swedish, Norwegian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Sif, which meant "bride, kinswoman". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Thor. After the trickster Loki cut off her golden hair, an angry Thor forced him to create a replacement.
Sixten m Swedish
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".
Sjurd m Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian variant form of Sigurd.
Skaði f Norse Mythology
Means "damage, harm" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology she was a mountain giantess associated with the winter and skiing. After the gods killed her father, they offered her a husband from among them as compensation. She ended up marrying Njord.
Skuld f Norse Mythology
Means "debt, obligation" in Old Norse. She was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny, in Norse mythology. She was also one of the valkyries.
Sky f & m English (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse ský "cloud".
Skye f English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of Sky.
Snorre m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Snorri.
Snorri m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
Soini m Finnish
Finnish form of Sven.
Sóldís f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Saldís.
Sóley f Icelandic
Means "buttercup flower" in Icelandic (genus Ranunculus), derived from sól "sun" and ey "island".
Solfrid f Norwegian
From the Old Norse elements sól "sun" and fríðr "beautiful". This name was apparently coined in the 19th century.
Sólveig f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Solveig.
Solveig f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From an Old Norse name, which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt (1876).
Solveiga f Latvian, Lithuanian
Latvian and Lithuanian form of Solveig.
Solvej f Danish
Danish form of Solveig.
Sølvi f Norwegian
Norwegian variant of Solveig. It is also used as a short form of Silvia.
Solvig f Swedish
Swedish variant form of Solveig.
Somerled m Scottish
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Sumarliði meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.
Somhairle m Scottish, Irish
Gaelic form of Sumarliði (see Somerled).
Sondre m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Sundri, possibly from Old Norse sunn meaning "south".
Sorley m Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Somhairle.
Ståle m Norwegian
From the Old Norse byname Stáli, which was derived from stál meaning "steel".
Stáli m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Ståle.
Steen m Danish
Danish cognate of Sten.
Stein m Norwegian
Norwegian cognate of Sten.
Steinar m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Steinarr, derived from the elements steinn "stone" and arr "warrior".
Steingrímur m Icelandic
From the Old Norse name Steingrímr, derived from the elements steinn "stone" and grímr "mask".
Steinn m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Sten.
Steinunn f Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements steinn "stone" and unnr "to wave, to billow".
Sten m Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Estonian
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone".
Stian m Norwegian
Modern Norwegian form of Stígandr.
Stig m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of Stigr.
Stígandr m Ancient Scandinavian
Means "wanderer" in Old Norse.
Stigr m Ancient Scandinavian
Means "path" in Old Norse.
Storm m & f English (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Danish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern)
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English or Old Dutch storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
Sundri m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Sondre.
Sune m Swedish, Danish
Modern form of Suni.
Suni m Ancient Scandinavian
From Old Norse sunr meaning "son".
Svana f Icelandic
Short form of Svanhildur.
Svanhild f Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Scandinavian cognate of Swanhild. In the Norse legend the Völsungasaga she is the daughter of Sigurd and Gudrun.
Svanhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Svanhild.
Svea f Swedish
From a personification of the country of Sweden, in use since the 17th century. It is a derivative of Svear, the Swedish name for the ancient Germanic tribe the Swedes. The Swedish name of the country of Sweden is Sverige, a newer form of Svear rike meaning "the realm of the Svear".
Svein m Norwegian
Norwegian variant of Sven.
Sveinn m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Sven.
Sven m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn meaning "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
Svend m Danish
Danish form of Sven.
Svenja f German
German feminine form of Sven.
Sverre m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Sverrir meaning "wild, swinging, spinning".
Sverrir m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Sverre, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
Sylvi f Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish
Norwegian and Swedish variant of Solveig. It is also used as a short form of Sylvia.
Tarben m Danish (Rare)
Danish variant of Torben.
Tasgall m Scottish
Scottish form of Ásketill.
Taskill m Scottish
Anglicized form of Tasgall.
Terje 1 m Norwegian
Norwegian variant of Torgeir.
Þór m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Þórr (see Thor).
Thor m Norse Mythology, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. In Norse mythology Thor is a god of storms, thunder, war and strength, a son of Odin. He is portrayed as red-bearded, short-tempered, armed with a powerful hammer called Mjölnir, and wearing an enchanted belt called Megingjörð that doubles his strength. During Ragnarök, the final battle at the end of the world, it is foretold that Thor will slay the monstrous sea serpent Jörmungandr but be fatally poisoned by its venom.
Þóra f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see Thor) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
Thora f Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of Þóra.
Þórarinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with arn "eagle".
Thorben m Danish, German
Variant of Torben.
Þórbjǫrg f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's protection", from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Þorbjörg f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Þórbjǫrg.
Þorbjörn m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Torbjörn.
Thorburn m English (Rare)
From a Scottish and English surname that was derived from the Norse name Þórbjǫrn (see Torbjörn).
Þórdís f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "Thor's goddess" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with Old Norse dís "goddess".
Þórfastr m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see Thor) and fastr "firm".
Þórfreðr m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see Thor) and friðr "peace".
Þórfríðr f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see Thor) and fríðr "beautiful".
Þórgísl m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's shaft" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with gísl "shaft, arrow".
Þórhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Þórhildr.
Þórir m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "Thor's warrior" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with Old Norse vér "warrior, fighter".
Þórný f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Torny.
Þórr m Norse Mythology
Original Old Norse form of Thor.
Thorstein m Norwegian
Norwegian variant form of Torsten.
Þorsteinn m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Torsten.
Þórunn f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Torunn.
Þórveig f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with veig "strength".
Þórví f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with "holy".
Þróndr m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Trond.
Thrud f Ancient Scandinavian (Anglicized)
From the Old Norse Þrúðr meaning "strength". In Norse mythology this was the name of a daughter of Thor and Sif.
Þrúðr f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Thrud.
Þrúður f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Þrúðr (see Thrud).
Þrymr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Trym.
Þunor m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Þórr (see Thor).
Thurstan m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Norse name Þórsteinn (see Torsten).
Thyge m Danish (Rare)
Variant of Tyge.
Thyra f Swedish, Danish
Variant of Tyra.
Þýri f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Tyra.
Tiw m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon form of Tiwaz (see Tyr).
Tóki m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Tyge.
Tollak m Norwegian (Rare)
From the Old Norse name Þórleikr, which meant "Thor's play" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with leikr "play, game (involving weapons)".
Tone 2 f Norwegian
Newer form of Torny.
Tonje f Norwegian
Variant of Torny.
Tor m Norwegian, Swedish
Modern Scandinavian form of Þórr (see Thor). It was not used as a personal name until the 18th century. It is sometimes used as a short form of names of Old Norse origin that begin with the element Tor, which is also a derivative of Þórr.
Tora f Swedish, Norwegian
Modern form of Þóra.
Torben m Danish, German
Danish form of Torbjörn.
Torbjørg f Norwegian
Norwegian form of Þórbjǫrg.
Torbjörn m Swedish
From the Old Norse name Þórbjǫrn, which meant "Thor's bear" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with bjǫrn "bear".
Torbjørn m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Torbjörn.
Torborg f Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Swedish and Norwegian form of Þórbjǫrg.
Torcuil m Scottish
Scottish form of Þórketill (see Torkel).
Tordis f Norwegian
Modern form of Þórdís.
Tore 1 m Norwegian, Swedish
Modern Scandinavian form of Þórir.
Torgeir m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórgeirr, which meant "Thor's spear" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with geirr "spear".
Torger m Norwegian
Variant of Torgeir.
Torgny m Swedish
From the Old Norse name Þórgnýr meaning "Thor's noise" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with gnýr "noise, grumble, murmur".
Torhild f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórhildr, which meant "Thor's battle" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with hildr "battle".