Names Categorized "top 10 in moscow"

This is a list of names in which the categories include top 10 in moscow.
gender
usage
ALEKSANDR m Russian, Armenian, Ukrainian
Russian and Armenian form of ALEXANDER. This name was borne by the 19th-century Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin.
ALISA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bosnian, Finnish
Russian, Ukrainian, Bosnian and Finnish form of ALICE.
ANASTASIYA f Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of ANASTASIA. This name was borne by the wife of the Russian czar Ivan the Terrible.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
ARTYOM m Russian
Russian form of ARTEMIOS.
DANIIL m Russian, Belarusian, Greek
Russian, Belarusian and Greek form of DANIEL.
DMITRIY m Russian
Russian form of DEMETRIUS. A famous bearer was Dmitriy Mendeleev (1834-1907), the Russian chemist who devised the periodic table.
IVAN m Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
LEV (1) m Russian
Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).
MAKSIM m Russian, Belarusian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Russian, Belarusian and Macedonian form of MAXIMUS, as well as an alternate transcription of Ukrainian Максим (see MAKSYM).
MARIYA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of MARIA, as well as an alternate transcription of Belarusian Марыя (see MARYIA).
MARK m English, Russian, Dutch, Danish, Biblical
Form of Latin MARCUS used in several languages. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.... [more]
MATVEY m Russian
Russian form of MATTHEW.
MIKHAIL m Russian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Russian and Belarusian form of MICHAEL, and an alternate transcription of Bulgarian Михаил (see MIHAIL). This was the name of two Russian tsars. Other notable bearers include the poet Mikhail Lermontov (1814-1841) and the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev (1931-).
POLINA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Greek
Either a Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Greek form of PAULINA or a short form of APOLLINARIYA.
SOFIYA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of SOPHIA.
VARVARA f Russian, Greek, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Greek, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of BARBARA.
VIKTORIYA f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of VICTORIA, as well as an alternate transcription of Belarusian Вікторыя (see VIKTORYIA).
YELIZAVETA f Russian
Russian form of ELIZABETH. This was the name of an 18th-century Russian empress.
YEVA f Russian, Armenian
Russian and Armenian form of EVE.