Names Categorized "war"

This is a list of names in which the categories include war.
gender
usage
Ælfwig m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
Agnar m Norwegian, Icelandic
From the Old Norse name Agnarr, derived from agi "awe, terror" or egg "edge of a sword" combined with arr "warrior".
Agnarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Agnar.
Agner m Danish
Danish form of Agnar.
Alda 2 f Limburgish
Limburgish short form of Aldegonda.
Aldara f Galician
Galician form of the Visigothic name Hildiwara, which was composed of the Germanic elements hild "battle" and war "vigilant, cautious". This was the name of the mother of Saint Rosendo (10th century).
Aldegonda f Dutch
Dutch form of Aldegund.
Aldegund f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and gund "war". Saint Aldegund (or Aldegundis) was a 7th-century Frankish abbess.
Aldith f Medieval English
Middle English form of Ealdgyð.
Alfarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Alvar.
Alfher m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements alf "elf" and hari "army, warrior" (making it a cognate of Alvar).
Alfhild f Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr, which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Scandinavian legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to King Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
Alfhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Alfhild.
Alfons m German, Dutch, Catalan, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Catalan form of Alfonso.
Alfonsina f Italian
Italian feminine form of Alfonso.
Alfonso m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of a Visigothic Germanic name, probably meaning "noble and ready", from the element adal "noble" combined with funs "ready". Other theories claim the first element is hadu or hild (see Ildefonso), both of which mean "battle". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. This was the name of six kings of Portugal and kings of several ancient regions of Spain.
Alma 1 f English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Albanian, Slovene, Croatian
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
Alphonsine f French
French feminine diminutive of Alfonso.
Alvar m Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
Alvilda f Danish (Rare)
Danish form of Alfhild.
Alvilde f Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian form of Alfhild.
Alwilda f History
Latinized form of Alfhild. This was the name of a legendary female Scandinavian pirate, also called Awilda.
Anat 1 f Semitic Mythology
Possibly derived from a Semitic root meaning "water spring". Anat was a goddess of fertility, hunting and war worshipped by the Semitic peoples of the Levant. She was the sister and consort of the god Hadad.
Anik m Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Means "army" or "splendour" in Sanskrit.
Ares m Greek Mythology
Perhaps from either Greek ἀρή (are) meaning "bane, ruin" or ἄρσην (arsen) meaning "male". The name first appears as a-re in Mycenaean Greek writing. Ares was the bloodthirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.
Aris 1 m Greek
Modern Greek form of Ares. It is also used as a short form of Aristotelis.
Aristomache f Ancient Greek
Derived from the Greek elements ἄριστος (aristos) meaning "best" and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle".
Åshild f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Áshildr, derived from the elements áss "god" and hildr "battle".
Áshildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Åshild.
Ashtoreth f Biblical, Semitic Mythology
From עַשְׁתֹרֶת ('Ashtoret), the Hebrew form of the name of a Phoenician goddess of love, war and fertility. Her name is cognate to that of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar.
Audhild f Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements auðr "wealth, fortune" and hildr "battle".
Auðrhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Audhild.
Averill m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was originally derived from the feminine given name Eoforhild.
Baak m Frisian
Originally a short form of names starting with the Germanic element badu "fight, struggle".
Bada m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name probably derived from beadu meaning "battle".
Badulf m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements badu "fight, struggle" and wulf "wolf".
Badurad m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements badu "fight, struggle" and rad "counsel".
Bahram m Persian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Verethragna meaning "victory over resistance". This was the name of a Zoroastrian god (one of the Amesha Spenta) associated with victory and war. This name was borne by several Sassanid emperors. It is also the Persian name for the planet Mars.
Bård m Norwegian
Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Bárðr, which was derived from the elements baðu "battle" and friðr "peace".
Batyr m Turkmen
Turkmen form of the Turkic word bagatur meaning "hero, warrior".
Bellona f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin bellare meaning "to fight". This was the name of the Roman goddess of war, a companion of Mars.
Berthild f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht "bright" and hild "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, an abbess of Chelles in France.
Blair m & f Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic blàr meaning "plain, field, battlefield". In Scotland this name is typically masculine.... [more]
Borghild f Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse elements borg "fortification" and hildr "battle". In the Norse Völsungasaga she was the wife of Sigmund.
Borghildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Borghild.
Bořivoj m Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements borti "battle" and voji "soldier". This name was borne by a 9th-century duke of Bohemia.
Brünhild f German (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
Brunhilda f History
Variant of Brünhild, referring to the Frankish queen.
Brunhilde f German
Newer German form of Brünhild.
Brunihild f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Brünhild.
Brunilda f Albanian, Spanish, Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Albanian, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Brünhild.
Brynhildr f Norse Mythology, Old Norse
Old Norse cognate of Brünhild. In the Norse legend the Völsungasaga Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
Brynhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Brynhildr.
Cadell m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catell, derived from cat "battle" and a diminutive suffix. This was the name of two early kings of Powys in Wales.
Cadfael m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catmail meaning "battle prince", from cat "battle" and mael "prince". This was apparently the birth name of Saint Cadoc. It was used by the British author Ellis Peters for the main character in her books The Cadfael Chronicles, first released in 1977.
Cadoc m Old Welsh
From an Old Welsh name, recorded in Latinized forms such as Catocus, derived from cat meaning "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
Cadwgan m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catguocaun (and many other spellings) meaning "glory in battle", from cat "battle" and guocaun "glory, honour". It appears briefly in the medieval Welsh tale The Dream of Rhonabwy.
Cahir m Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Cathaoir, possibly meaning "battle man" from Old Irish cath "battle" and fer "man".
Casilda f Spanish
Meaning uncertain. This is the name of the 11th-century patron saint of Toledo, Spain. It might have an Arabic origin (Saint Casilda was a Moorish princess), perhaps from قصيدة (qasidah) meaning "poem". Alternatively it could be derived from a Germanic name in which the second element is hild meaning "battle".
Cathair m Irish
Variant of Cathaoir.
Cathal m Irish, Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish cath "battle" and fal "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It was also borne by several Irish kings. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
Cathán m Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish cath "battle" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Cathán was a 6th-century Irish monk, a missionary to the Isle of Bute.
Cathaoir m Irish (Rare)
Irish Gaelic form of Cahir.
Ceallach m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Cellach, of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish cellach "war, strife" or cell "church". This name was borne by several early Irish kings and by a 12th-century saint, an Archbishop of Armagh.
Cenk m Turkish
Means "battle, war" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
Chad m English
From the Old English name Ceadda, which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Old Welsh cat "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
Chlotichilda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Clotilde.
Clotilda f English
English form of Clotilde.
Clotilde f French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda, which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
Cunégonde f French (Rare)
French form of Kunigunde. Voltaire used this name in his novel Candide (1759).
Cunigund f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Kunigunde.
Cynbel m Medieval Welsh
Medieval Welsh name of uncertain meaning.
Daenerys f Literature
Created by author George R. R. Martin for a character in his series A Song of Ice and Fire, first published 1996, and the television adaptation Game of Thrones (2011-2019). An explanation for the meaning of her name is not provided, though it is presumably intended to be of Valyrian origin. In the series Daenerys Targaryen is a queen of the Dothraki and a claimant to the throne of Westeros.
Duilio m Italian, Spanish
From the Roman name Duilius, which is possibly derived from Latin duellum "war". This was the name of a Roman consul who defeated the Carthaginians in a naval battle.
Duilius m Ancient Roman
Latin form of Duilio.
Eadgyð f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Edith.
Eadwig m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman Conquest.
Ealdgyð f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
Edith f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. It was also borne by the Anglo-Saxon wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto I. The name remained common after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
Editha f German, English (Rare)
Latinate form of Edith.
Edvige f Italian
Italian form of Hedwig.
Eilert m Frisian, Norwegian, Swedish
Frisian and Scandinavian form of Egilhard.
Elda f Italian
Italian form of Hilda.
Elvar m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Alvar.
Enyo f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. She was a bloodthirsty Greek war goddess and a companion of Ares.
Eoforhild f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
Eris f Greek Mythology
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
Eseld f Cornish
Cornish form of Iseult.
Everild f History (Ecclesiastical)
Latinized form of Eoforhild. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
Garrett m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Gerald or Gerard. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
Gerard m English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger meaning "spear" combined with hard meaning "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
Gerarda f Italian, Dutch
Feminine form of Gerard.
Gerda 1 f German, Dutch
Feminine form of Gerd 1.
Gerdina f Dutch
Feminine form of Gerd 1.
Gerhild f German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
Gonçal m Catalan (Rare)
Catalan form of Gonzalo.
Gonçalo m Portuguese
Portuguese form of Gonzalo.
Gonzalo m Spanish
From the medieval name Gundisalvus, which was the Latin form of a Germanic name composed of gund meaning "war" and an uncertain second element (possibly Latin salvus "safe", or a Germanic element with the spelling influenced by that Latin word). Saint Gonzalo was an 11th-century bishop of Mondoñedo in Galicia, Spain.
Gordon m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place in Berwickshire, itself derived from Brythonic elements meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.... [more]
Griselda f English, Spanish, Literature
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval folklore, adapted into tales by Boccaccio (in The Decameron) and Chaucer (in The Canterbury Tales).
Grizel f Scots
Scots form of Griselda.
Guiomar f & m Portuguese, Spanish, Arthurian Romance
Possibly derived from the Germanic name Wigmar, which is formed of the elements wig "war, battle" and mari "famous". In the medieval Lancelot-Grail Cycle he plays a minor role as a cousin of Guinevere, who banishes him after he becomes a lover of Morgan le Fey. In modern Portugal and Spain it is a feminine name.
Gunborg f Swedish
From the Old Norse name Gunnbjǫrg, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and bjǫrg "help, save, rescue".
Gunda f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund meaning "war".
Gundhram m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Guntram.
Gundisalvus m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Old Germanic (Latinized) form of Gonzalo.
Gunhild f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
Gunnar m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr, which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of Günther). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
Gunnr f Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse gunnr meaning "war". This was the name of a valkyrie in Norse legend.
Gunnvǫr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Gunvor.
Gunnvor f Norwegian
Variant of Gunvor.
Günther m German, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied, which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
Guntram m German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
Gunvor f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvǫr meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vǫr "vigilant, cautious".
Hadewidis f Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu meaning "battle, combat" and wid meaning "wide".
Hadubert m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements hadu "battle" and beraht "bright".
Hailwic f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Heilwig.
Harold m English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman Conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
Hartwig m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
Harvey m English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
Hawise f Medieval English
English form of a medieval French name appearing in various spellings such as Haueis or Haouys, which were derived from Hadewidis. The name was borne by a number of Norman and Anglo-Norman noblewomen from the 11th to 13th centuries.
Hedvig f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish and Hungarian form of Hedwig.
Hedvika f Czech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene form of Hedwig.
Hedwig f German
From the Germanic name Hadewig, derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and wig "war". This was the name of a 13th-century German saint, the wife of the Polish duke Henry the Bearded. It was subsequently borne by a 14th-century Polish queen (usually known by her Polish name Jadwiga) who is now also regarded as a saint.
Hedy f German, Dutch
Diminutive of Hedwig and other Germanic names beginning with the element hadu meaning "battle, combat".
Heilwig f German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements heil "happy, hearty, healthy" and wig "war".
Heta f Finnish
Finnish vernacular form of Hedvig.
Hidde m Frisian
Frisian short form of names containing the Germanic element hild meaning "battle".
Hild f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Hilda.
Hilda f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Hungarian, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
Hilde f German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian variant of Hilda.
Hildebert m German (Rare)
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
Hildebrand m German (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
Hildegard f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
Hildiberht m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Hildebert.
Hildiwara f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Aldara.
Hildr f Old Norse, Norse Mythology
Old Norse cognate of Hilda. In Norse legend this was the name of a valkyrie.
Hildræd m Anglo-Saxon
Older form of Hildred.
Hildred f & m English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
Hildur f Icelandic, Norwegian
Icelandic form of Hildr.
Hillevi f Swedish, Finnish
Swedish and Finnish form of Heilwig.
Hiltrud f German
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
Hoder m Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Hǫðr, derived from hǫð meaning "battle". In Norse mythology he was a blind god, tricked by Loki into killing his brother Balder.
Hrafnhildr f Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements hrafn "raven" and hildr "battle".
Hrafnhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Hrafnhildr.
Huitzilopochtli m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "left side of the hummingbird" or "southern hummingbird" in Nahuatl, derived from huitzilin "hummingbird" and ōpōchtli "left, south". In Aztec mythology he was the god of the sun and war. He was a patron deity of the city of Tenochtitlan (at the site of modern Mexico City).
Ilbert m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Germanic given name Hildebert.
Ilda f Italian
Italian form of Hilda.
Imelda f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Irmhild. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
Irmhild f German
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and hild "battle".
Irnerius m History
Possibly from Wernerius, a Latinized form of the Germanic name Werner. This was the name of a 12th-century Italian scholar and jurist.
Ishild f Ancient Germanic (Hypothetical)
Germanic name, a hypothetical early form of Iseult.
Ishtar f Semitic Mythology
From the Semitic root ‌'ṯtr, which possibly relates to the Evening Star. Ishtar was an Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess who presided over love, war and fertility. She was cognate with the Canaanite and Phoenician Ashtoreth, and she was also identified with the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
Isolde f German, Arthurian Romance
German form of Iseult, appearing in the 13th-century German poem Tristan by Gottfried von Strassburg. In 1865 the German composer Richard Wagner debuted his popular opera Tristan und Isolde and also used the name for his first daughter.
Ivor m Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland (Irish Íomhar), Scotland (Scottish Gaelic Iomhar) and Wales (Welsh Ifor).
Jitendra m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "conqueror of Indra" from Sanskrit जिति (jiti) meaning "victory, conquering" combined with the name of the god Indra.
Kamau m Eastern African, Kikuyu
Possibly means "quiet warrior" in Kikuyu.
Kane m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Catháin, derived from the given name Cathán.
Klotild f Hungarian (Rare)
Hungarian form of Clotilde.
Kriemhild f German (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied, where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
Kunegunda f Polish (Rare)
Polish form of Kunigunde. The 13th-century Saint Kunegunda was the daughter of Bela IV, king of Hungary. She married Boleslaus V of Poland, but after his death refused to assume power and instead became a nun.
Kunigunde f German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic element kuni "clan, family" combined with gund "war". Saint Kunigunde was the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Henry II.
Leofgyð f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and gyð "battle".
Louis m French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of Ludwig. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
Ludwig m German
From the Germanic name Chlodovech meaning "famous battle", composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
Lysimachus m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυσίμαχος (Lysimachos), derived from λύσις (lysis) meaning "a release, loosening" and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle". This was the name of one of the generals under Alexander the Great. After Alexander's death Lysimachus took control of Thrace.
Mafalda f Portuguese, Italian, Spanish
Originally a medieval Portuguese form of Matilda. This name was borne by the wife of Afonso, the first king of Portugal. In modern times it was the name of the titular character in a popular Argentine comic strip (published from 1964 to 1973) by Quino.
Magnhild f Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse magn "mighty, strong" and hildr "battle". This was the name of an 1877 novel by the Norwegian author Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson.
Magnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Magnhild.
Mars m Roman Mythology
Possibly related to Latin mas meaning "male" (genitive maris). In Roman mythology Mars was the god of war, often equated with the Greek god Ares. This is also the name of the fourth planet in the solar system.
Matilda f English, Swedish, Finnish, Slovak, Slovene
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.... [more]
Maud f English, French, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval English and French form of Matilda. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Tennyson's 1855 poem Maud.
Maude f English, French
Variant of Maud.
Mildgyð f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements milde "gentle" and gyð "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the sister of Saint Mildred.
Murugan m Hinduism, Tamil
Possibly from a Dravidian word meaning "youth". This is the name of a Tamil war god identified with Skanda.
Neith f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian nt, possibly from nt "water" or nrw "fear, dread". This was the name of an early Egyptian goddess of weaving, hunting and war. Her character may have some correspondences with the goddesses Tanith, Anat or Athena.
Neoptolemus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νεοπτόλεμος (Neoptolemos) meaning "new war", derived from νέος (neos) meaning "new" combined with an Epic Greek form of πόλεμος (polemos) meaning "war". In Greek legend this was the name of the son of Achilles, brought into the Trojan War because it was prophesied the Greeks could not win it unless he was present. After the war he was slain by Orestes fighting over Hermione.
Nikostratos m Ancient Greek
Means "army of victory" from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and στρατός (stratos) meaning "army". This was the name of a Roman saint martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian at the end of the 3rd century.
Nilda f Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of Brunilda.
Ninurta m Sumerian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Derived from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lord" and 𒅁 (urta) meaning "ear of barley". In Sumerian and Akkadian mythology Ninurta was a god of agriculture, hunting and healing, later associated with war. He was also called Ningirsu, though they may have originally been separate deities.
Oliver m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
Olivette f Literature
Feminine form of Oliver. This was the name of the title character in the French opera Les noces d'Olivette (1879) by Edmond Audran.
Olivia f English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
Olve m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Ǫlvir, possibly derived from ala "all" or alu "defense, protection, luck" combined with vér "holy man" or "warrior".
Ölvir m Icelandic (Rare)
Icelandic form of Olve.
Ǫlvir m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Olve.
Pharaildis f Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Derived from the Germanic elements fara "journey" and hild "battle". This was the name of an 8th-century saint from Ghent, Belgium.
Potsʉnakwahipʉ m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "male bison back" in Comanche, derived from potsʉ "male bison" and kwahi "back (body part)". This name was borne by a 19th-century war chief of the Penateka Comanche, also called Buffalo Hump.
Ptolemais f Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Ptolemaios (see Ptolemy).
Ptolemy m History
From the Greek name Πτολεμαῖος (Ptolemaios), derived from Greek πολεμήϊος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive, warlike". Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendants of Ptolemy I Soter, one of the generals of Alexander the Great. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer.
Raganhildis f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Reinhild.
Raghnaid f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ragnhild.
Ragnhild f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ragnhildr, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and hildr "battle".
Ragnhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ragnhild.
Ratimir m Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rati meaning "war, battle" and miru meaning "peace, world".
Ratko m Croatian, Serbian
Diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element rati meaning "war, battle".
Ratomir m Serbian
Serbian form of Ratimir.
Reinhild f German
From a Germanic name that was composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hild "battle".
Robert m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).... [more]
Romilda f Italian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
Rumhilt f Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of Romilda.
Savaş m Turkish
Means "war" in Turkish.
Shulmanu m Semitic Mythology
Possibly cognate with the Western Semitic god Shalim. Shulmanu was an Eastern Semitic (Mesopotamian) god associated with battle.
Sieghild f German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hild "battle".
Sigihild f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Sieghild.
Skanda m Hinduism
Means "hopping, spurting, spilling" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of the god of war, also known as Kartikeya or Murugan. He is worshipped especially by the Tamils in southern India.
Snorre m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Snorri.
Svanhild f Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Scandinavian cognate of Swanhild. In the Norse legend the Völsungasaga she is the daughter of Sigurd and Gudrun.
Svanhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Svanhild.
Swanahilda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Swanhild.
Swanhild f German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
Takehiko m Japanese
From Japanese (take) meaning "military, martial" or (take) meaning "bamboo" combined with (hiko) meaning "boy, prince". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Tasunka m Indigenous American, Sioux (Anglicized)
From Lakota Tȟašuŋke meaning "his horse", derived from šuŋg "horse". This forms the first part of the name of Tasunka Witko (1840-1877), translated as Crazy Horse, a Lakota war leader.
Tezcatlipoca m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "smoking mirror" in Nahuatl, derived from tezcatl "mirror" and pōctli "smoke". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was one of the chief gods, associated with the night sky, winds, war, and the north. Like his rival Quetzalcoatl, he was a creator god.
Thor m Norse Mythology, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. In Norse mythology Thor is a god of storms, thunder, war and strength, a son of Odin. He is portrayed as red-bearded, short-tempered, armed with a powerful hammer called Mjölnir, and wearing an enchanted belt called Megingjörð that doubles his strength. During Ragnarök, the final battle at the end of the world, it is foretold that Thor will slay the monstrous sea serpent Jörmungandr but be fatally poisoned by its venom.
Torhild f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórhildr, which meant "Thor's battle" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with hildr "battle".
Torild f Norwegian
Variant of Torhild.
Tyr m Norse Mythology
From Týr, the Old Norse form of the name of the Germanic god Tiwaz, related to Indo-European *Dyews (see Zeus). In Norse mythology he was a god associated with war and justice, by some accounts a son of Odin. While the gods bound the great wolf Fenrir, Tyr placated the beast by placing his right hand in its mouth. After the binding was successful, Fenrir bit off Tyr's hand. At the time of the end of the world, Ragnarök, it is foretold that Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
Vahagn m Armenian Mythology, Armenian
From Avestan Verethragna meaning "breaking of defense, victory". In Armenian mythology this was the name of the heroic god of war.
Veerle f Dutch
Dutch form of Pharaildis.
Verethragna m Persian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of Bahram.
Vígdís f Old Norse
Derived from the Old Norse elements víg "war" and dís "goddess".
Vigdís f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Vígdís.
Vigdis f Norwegian
Norwegian form of Vígdís.
Vilde f Norwegian
Short form of Alvilde.
Villads m Danish
Danish form of Willihad.
Viveka f Swedish
Swedish form of Wiebke.
Walter m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
Werner m German, Dutch
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army". A famous bearer was the German physicist Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976).
Wibo m Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive of Wiebe.
Wiebe m Frisian, Dutch
Medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element wig meaning "war".
Wiebke f Frisian, German
Feminine form of Wiebe.
Wigand m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element wig meaning "war".
Wigberht m Anglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of Wybert. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
Wigbrand m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and brand "sword".
Wigburg f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and burg "fortress".
Wighard m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of Wigheard.
Wigheard m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
Wigmar m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form (possibly) of Guiomar.
Wigmund m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Wymond.
Wigstan m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Wystan.
Willihad m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hadu "battle, combat". This was the name of an 8th-century saint active in Frisia and Saxony.
Wybert m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
Wymond m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
Wyot m Medieval English
Middle English form of Wigheard.
Wystan m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman Conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
Xiomara f Spanish
Possibly a Spanish form of Guiomar.
Yuda m Indonesian
Means "war" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit युद्ध (yuddha).
Zelda 2 f English
Short form of Griselda. This is the name of a princess in the Legend of Zelda video games, debuting in 1986. According to creator Shigeru Miyamoto she was named after the American socialite Zelda Fitzgerald (1900-1948).