Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Misericordia f Spanish, Roman Mythology
Means "compassion" in Latin, ultimately from miser "poor, wretched" and cor "heart". In Roman mythology Misericordia was the personification of mercy, pity and compassion, equivalent to the Greek goddess Eleos... [more]
Mist f Norse Mythology, Icelandic
From Old Norse mistr meaning "cloud, mist".... [more]
Miðgarðsormr m Norse Mythology
Means "world serpent". This is another name for Jörmungandr, the son of Loki and Angrboða... [more]
Mjǫll f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "fresh, powdery snow" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology, Mjǫll was the daughter of king Snær.
Mjǫðvitnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from mjǫðr ("honey, mead") and vitnir (poetic word for "wolf"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Mnesarchos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from the Greek adjective μνήσιος (mnesios) meaning "of memory", which is ultimately derived from the Greek verb μνημονεύω (mnemoneuo) meaning "to call to mind, to remember, to think of", itself ultimately derived from the Greek verb μνάομαι (mnaomai) meaning "to remember, to be mindful of"... [more]
Mnesarchus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Mnesarchos. This name was borne by an ancient Greek tyrant of Chalcis from the 4th century BC as well as by a character in Greek mythology.
Mnesimache f Greek Mythology
Derived from μνησῐ- (mnēsi-) meaning "reminding" and μαχη (mache) meaning "battle".
Mnesos m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective μνήσιος (mnesios) meaning "of memory", which is ultimately derived from the Greek verb μνημονεύω (mnemoneuo) meaning "to call to mind, to remember, to think of", itself ultimately derived from the Greek verb μνάομαι (mnaomai) meaning "to remember, to be mindful of".... [more]
Mnestra f Greek Mythology
Perhaps derived from Greek μνηστρια (mnestria) "courter, wooer". In Greek legend she was a princess of Thessalia (in northern Greece) who was loved by the god Poseidon... [more]
Mnesus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Mnesos. In Greek mythology, Mnesus was a Paeonian warrior killed by Achilles.
Modron f Welsh Mythology
From Matrona, the name of a Gaulish mother goddess, which derives from the Indo-European root *mater meaning "mother". In Welsh legend she was the mother of Mabon the Enchanter; the pair's names, Modron and Mabon, derive from roots meaning "mother" and "son", "with the suffix on typically found in divine or semi-divine names." Several scholars point to her as the origin of Morgan le Fay; she may also serve as the prototype of the Lady of the Lake.
Moirae f Greek Mythology
The meaning of this name can be translated to "fates". THE MOIRAI (Moirae) were the three goddesses of fate who personified the inescapable destiny of man. They assigned to every person his or her fate or share in the scheme of things... [more]
Mokh-naana f Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Vainakh goddess of wind.
Molpadia f Greek Mythology
Means "divine song" from Greek μολπή (molpê) "song" and διά (dia) "divine, heavenly" (related to Διος (Dios) "of Zeus"). In Greek mythology, this was the name of an Amazon.
Molpia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μόλπη meaning "melody".
Molyz-yerdi m Caucasian Mythology
This is the name of the Vainakh god of war who brought the Chechen and Ingush people to victory.
Moneiba f Spanish (Canarian, Rare), Guanche Mythology
From Guanche *mənəy-ibba meaning literally "smoky glow". This was the name of a goddess worshipped by women on the island of Hierro (present-day Canary Islands, Spain), which was inhabited by a people known as the Bimbache.
Mongfind f Irish Mythology
Older form of Mongfhionn, derived from Irish mong "hair" and fionn "white; bright". ... [more]
Montu m Egyptian Mythology
Means "nomad". ... [more]
Morea f Greek Mythology
Morea is the name of an Hamadryad from ancient Greek mythology. Her name means "mulberry bush".
Moria f Greek Mythology
Meant "sacred olive tree" in Greek, referring to a type of olive tree in ancient Greece that was believed to have "been propagated from the original olive which Athena herself had caused to spring up on the Acropolis"; uprooting a sacred moria was an offense punishable by dispossession and banishment.... [more]
Moros m Greek Mythology
From the Greek word Μόρος, "doom, fate", Moros is the being of impending doom in Greek Mythology, he drives mortals to their deadly fate. ... [more]
Morta f Roman Mythology
In Roman mythology, Morta was the goddess of death. She is responsible for the pain and/or death that occur in a half-wake, half-sleep time frame. Her father is the god of darkness and her mother is the goddess of night... [more]
Mosirkara-kamuy m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) responsible for creating the Earth at the behest of (Kandakoro Kamuy).
Móðguðr f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Móðgunnr. In Norse mythology this is the name of the warden of the bridge Gjallarbrú ("bridge over Gjöll", the river closest to Helheim; "to travel the Gjallarbrú" was used by Sturla Thórdarson as a euphemism for "to die"), which must be crossed on the way to Helheim... [more]
Móði m Norse Mythology
Probably related to Old Norse móðr "excitement, wrath, anger". In Norse mythology, Modi and Magni are sons of Thor who will inherit their father's hammer after Ragnarǫk ("final destiny of the gods").
Móðsognir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly means "tired one" or "powerless one". In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf.
Móðvitnir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from móðr "mind; wrath; courage") and vitnir ("wolf"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Mousaios m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective Μουσαῖος (Mousaios) or Μούσειος (Mouseios) meaning "of the Muse(s)", which is ultimately derived from the Greek noun Μοῦσα (Mousa) meaning "Muse" as well as "music, song".
Mousika f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun μουσικά (mousika) meaning "music", which is closely related to the Greek noun μουσική (mousike) meaning "any of the Muses' arts" (especially music and lyrical poetry set to music)... [more]
Mozh f Caucasian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Mozh was the evil sister of the sun and moon in Vainakh mythology. She ate all her relatives and constantly chases the sun and moon, an eclipse occurring when she catches up to them... [more]
Mriduka f Hinduism
MEANING : delicate woman, Gentle lady, soft, Name of an Apsara
Mridukop m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Telugu, Tamil, Bengali
MEANING : mild in anger, of gentle nature. Here मृदु means soft, gentle + कोप means wrath, anger
Mridukopa f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Hinduism
MEANING : mild in anger, of gentle nature. Here मृदु means soft, gentle + कोपा means wrath,
Mriduna f Indian, Sanskrit, Tamil, Hinduism, Hindi, Bengali, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Nepali, Sinhalese, Gujarati
MEANING : gentle lady, soft, moderate ... [more]
Mridvika f Hinduism
MEANING : a vine, a bunch of red grapes... [more]
Mu'ak f Judeo-Christian Legend
This is the name given to the wife of Salah in the Book of Jubilees.
Much m Folklore
In the tales about the famous heroic outlaw Robin Hood, Much the Miller's Son was one of his Merry Men. In his case, Much is a nickname which he received because his abilities were apparently so unimpressive that it caused his parents to continually refer to him as "our son, though he's not much", which was ultimately shortened to Much.
Muhlo m Croatian (Rare), Slavic Mythology
An old Croatian name of unknown meaning.... [more]
Mukhar m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Tamil, Hinduism, Telugu, Nepali
MEANING : talkative, verbose, loquacious, garrulous ,leader, principal
Mukhara f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Indian, Marathi, Malayalam
MEANING : talkative, verbose, loquacious, garrulous, chief, leader
Mulac m New World Mythology
Mayan mythological name representing the North and the colour white. One of the Bacabs, gods representing North, South, East, and West. Associated with: Cauac, Kan, and Ix.
Mundilfari m Norse Mythology
a Jotun or giant who is the father of the goddess Sol and the god Mani.
Muninn m Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse munr "mind" (see also Munimund). In Norse mythology, Muninn is the name of one of Odin's two ravens. Muninn signifies Memory and each day, he and Huginn (the other raven) fly over all the nine worlds known in Norse mythology in order to gather news and information for Odin.
Mura f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Sinhalese, Nepali, Tamil
MEANING : a kind of fragrant plant, fragrance, ( It was the name of mother of Emperor Chandragupta & wife of King Suryagupta)... [more]
Murcia f Roman Mythology
Originally an epithet to the goddess Venus and connected to the word myrtus "myrtle tree", later connected to the Latin word murcus "lazy, inactive" and interpreted as goddess of laziness by Christian writers.
Musaeus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Mousaios. This name was borne by three Greek poets and by an officer of the Seleucid king Antiochus III the Great (2nd century BC).
Musagetes m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Μουσαγέτης (Mousagetes) meaning "leader of the Muses". This was an epithet of the god Apollo as leader of the nine Muses, also applied to Hercules.
Musica f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Mousika. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the Horae.
Mut f Egyptian Mythology
Means "mother".... [more]
Mẫu Thoải f Far Eastern Mythology
Vietnamese water goddess whose name is derived from mẫu meaning "mother" and thoải meaning "gentle, rolling".
Mẫu Thượng Ngàn f Far Eastern Mythology
Another name of the Vietnamese princess of the forest Lâm cung thánh mẫu. It is derived from mẫu meaning "mother", thượng meaning "upmost, higher" and ngàn a poetic term for "forest".
Mutunus m Roman Mythology
A phallic marriage deity, in some respects equated with Priapus.
Mycale f Greek Mythology
Mother o Orius, was famous for her incantations, which she had often used to conjure down the shining twin-horns of the unwilling moon, one of the Lapiths.
Mycene f Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown. It may be derived from μύκης (mycēs) meaning "mushroom".
Mygdon m Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown, perhaps related to μύγδαλο (mýgdalo) meaning "almond".
Mylin f Norse Mythology
Norse name meaning "luminary", taken from an epithet for the sun-goddess Sol.
Mylitta f Near Eastern Mythology (Hellenized)
From an Assyrian epithet of the goddess Ishtar meaning "the mediatrix, midwife" (from mu'allidtu). It was recorded by the Greek historian Herodotus, who wrote in the 5th century BC: "The Assyrians call Aphrodite Mylitta, the Arabians Alilat, and the Persians Mitra."
Myrina f Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek ìõñïí (myron) meaning "myrrh". In Greek mythology, Myrina was the Queen of the Amazons.
Myrmex m & f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun μύρμηξ (myrmex) meaning "ant". This name was predominantly bestowed upon men.
Myrtilos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek name, presumably derived Greek μύρτος (myrtos) "myrtle". In Greek mythology this name belonged to a son of Hermes and charioteer to Oenomaus.
Mysia f Biblical, Greek Mythology
From the name of a region in Asia Minor mentioned in Acts in the New Testament. It allegedly meant "land of beech trees". This was also an epithet of the Greek goddesses Demeter and Artemis.
Mytilene f Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown.
Na'ashjé'íí Asdzáá f New World Mythology
A benevolent Navajo deity whose name comes from naʼashjéʼii meaning "spider" and asdzáán meaning "woman".
Nad m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism
MEANING : a river (if thought of as a male), thunderer (as cloud), roarer, neigher(as a horse), bellower... [more]
Nadan m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism
MEANING : sounding, roaring ... [more]
Nageswari f Hinduism
Goddess name in India.
Nagini f Literature, Mythology
In mythology, the Nagas and Naginis are the respectively masculine and feminine serpent people of various Asian cultures. Descriptions of the Nagas vary from culture to culture; in some, they are depicted as giant black snakes, and in others they are said to bear the lower half of a serpent and the upper half of a human... [more]
Naglfar m Norse Mythology
Means "ship of the dead", derived from nagl ("dead person") and far ("ship; passage on a ship"). In Norse mythology this is the name of a ship helmed by Hymir (or Loki, depending on the text), which will put to sea at Ragnarǫk and take the inhabitants of Múpellsheimr to fight the gods... [more]
Naglfari m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of nagl ("dead person") and fara ("to move, to travel"). In Norse mythology this is the name of Nótt's first husband, with whom she had two sons, both named Auðr.
Nahan m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism
MEANING : binding, tying round, fetter, bolt, bond... [more]
Nahasr m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Indian
MEANING : putting on, crotchet, fetter, bond, girding round... [more]
Nahundi m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Nahundi was the god of the sun, but also the god of justice and law1. His name - spelled Nahiti in earlier times2 - was apparently the same as the word for 'sun' in Elamite3, although the literal meaning of that word is said to be "creator of the day"4... [more]
Naimittik m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Nepali, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati, Assamese, Indian (Sikh)
MEANING - Occassional, special, accidental, Fortune-teller
Náinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from ("dead person"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Naïs f French, Occitan, Greek Mythology
In France, this is used as a short form of Anaïs. It coincides with the French form of Nais, the name of a naiad from Greek Mythology... [more]
Nais f Greek Mythology
Means "river nymph", derived from Greek naiein "to flow".
Nakisawame f Japanese Mythology
The name of the Japanese goddess of spring water. Her name is derived from 泣 (naki) meaning "to weep", 啼 (naki) meaning "to wail, cry" or 哭 (naki) meaning "to cry, wail", 沢 (sawa) meaning "mountain stream, swamp, marsh" and 女 (me) meaning "woman".
Nakula m Hinduism
Sanskrit, name of the twin brother, the youngest of the 5 brothers born by king Pandu as recorded in the Mahabharata, younger brothers to Arjuna, great heroes in their own right, Nakula was tall and handsome, Sahadeva spoke eloquently and possessed great filial piety.
Nál f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "needle". In Norse mythology this is the name of a sorceress and another name for Laufey.
Náli m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly a male version of Nál, or derived from nagl ("dead person"). In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf, who may originally have been a demon of the dead.
Nalin m Hinduism
Means lotus. The lotus, a beautiful flower that flourishes in muddy waters, is symbolic of enlightenment found in difficult situations.
Nammu f Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology, she was a primeval goddess, corresponding to Tiamat in Babylonian mythology. She gave birth to An and Ki and the first gods, and with An she bore Enki... [more]
Nancy f New World Mythology
from NAHUATL Nantzin, means my lovely mother, refference to Earth mother Tonantzin godess
Nannaia f Near Eastern Mythology
Nannaia was a Parthian moon goddess.
Nanshe f Near Eastern Mythology
Etymology uncertain; derived in part from Sumerian še "grain". This was the name of a Sumerian goddess of prophecy, justice, fertility, and fishing.
Nantosuelta f Celtic Mythology
In Celtic mythology, Nantosuelta is the goddess of nature, the earth, fire and fertility. Nantosuelta is often associated with water and depicted as being surrounded by water. The goddess's name literally translates as "of winding stream" or "sun-drenched valley", from the Proto-Indo-European root *swel- "swelter", found in Indo-European words denoting "sun".
Napir m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Napir was the god of the moon.1 Some sources state that the meaning of his name is "(the) shining one"2, but this is questionable - it is more likely that it is derived from Elamite nap or napir meaning "god" (see Napirisha).3... [more]
Napirisha m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This is the epithet of the god Humban1 and he was almost exclusively known by this name in later times2... [more]
Nár m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from ("dead person"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Narasimha m Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada
Means "man-lion", derived from Sanskrit नर (nára) meaning "man, person" combined with सिंह (siṃhá) meaning "lion". In Hindu belief, this is a lion-headed avatar of the deity Vishnu.
Narayani f Hinduism, Indian, Malayalam, Tamil, Hindi, Bengali, Nepali
Feminine form of Narayana. This is an epithet of the Hindu goddesses Lakshmi and Durga.
Narcaeus m Greek Mythology
A son of Dionysus and Narcaea, established a sanctuary of Athena Narcaea in Elis, and also introduced there the worship of Dionysus. (Paus. v. 16. § 5.)
Narfi m Icelandic (Rare), Norse Mythology
Icelandic form and Norse variant of Narvi.
Nari m Norse Mythology
Nari is one of the sons of Loki and Sigyn. At the end of the epic poem "Lokasenna" Nari is said to be the brother of Narvi (also written as Narfi), while Sturlusson's Prose Edda uses Narvi as another name for Nari and names Váli as his brother.
Naria f Celtic Mythology
Naria was a Gallo-Roman goddess worshiped in western Switzerland. While her functions have been lost to time, it can be deduced from the sole image of her that she may have been a goddess of good luck and blessings, as her image was done in the generic style of Fortuna, the Roman goddess of luck... [more]
Nariman m Persian Mythology, Persian, Georgian (Rare), Kazakh, Kumyk, Lezgin, Tatar
From the Avestan name Nairemanah which meant "manly mind" or "heroic minded", derived Avestan from nairiia meaning "heroic, manly" and manah meaning "mind, thought".... [more]
Narius m Greek Mythology, Biblical
Derived from Greek(neros) meaning "water". In Greek and Roman myth this was the name of a god of the sea. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
Narsimhan m Tamil, Hinduism
The hindu Mythology shows that the hindu god of vishnu took ten forms to destroy evil on earth. one of the form was narsimha which means part human-part lion
Narundi f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Narundi was the goddess of victory and thus we can consider her to be a war goddess.1 It is uncertain what the meaning of her name was in the Elamite language... [more]
Narvi m Norse Mythology
Narvi is one of the sons of Loki and Sigyn. At the end of the epic poem "Lokasenna" Narvi is said to be the brother of Nari, while in Snorri Sturlusson's Prose Edda Narvi is another name for Nari.
Nástrǫnd m Norse Mythology
Means "shore of death" or "corpse shore". In Norse mythology this is the name of the afterlife for people guilty of murder, adultery and oath-breaking. It is a hall far from the sun with its gate facing north, poison dripping from its roof, and snakes curled in it... [more]
Naubolus m Greek Mythology
Derived from ναῦς (naûs) meaning "boat" and βόλος (bólos) meaning "a cast of a net".
Nauplius m Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Nauplius was the name of two characters, one descended from the other.
Nausithous m Greek Mythology
Derived from ναῦς (naûs) meaning “ship” and θοός (thoós) meaning "quick, swift".
Neachtan m Irish, Irish Mythology
The name of the Irish god of water, cognate to Neptune.
Neaira f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "new rising" from Greek νέος (neos) meaning "new, fresh" as well as "young, youthful" and αἴρω (airo) "lift, raise up". In Greek mythology this name belonged to a nymph of Thrinakia, a mythical island, who was loved by the sun god Helios... [more]
Neandros m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from Greek νέος (neos) meaning "young, youthful" as well as "new, fresh". The second element is derived from Greek ανδρος (andros) meaning "of a man"... [more]
Necessitas f Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Ancient roman form of Ananke the goddess of necessity.
Ne'elatama'uk f Judeo-Christian Legend
This is the name of the wife of Ham according to the Book of Jubilees.
Neelkanth m Hinduism
BLUE THROAT
Ne'eltama'uk f Judeo-Christian Legend
In the Book of Jubilees, this name is used for the wife of Shem. It is likely from ancient Babylonian.
Nefja f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Female form of Næfr. This is the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology.
Negafook m New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Negafook is a god of weather systems, particularly wintry cold ones.
Nehalennia f Germanic Mythology, German (Modern, Rare), Dutch (Modern, Rare)
Name of a Gaulish goddess of commerce worshipped in what is now the Netherlands, whose worship was prevalent when the Romans arrived to the area. She is believed to be a goddess of the sea, divination, and the Otherworld... [more]
Nehebkau m Egyptian Mythology
Means "(one who) brings together".... [more]
Nehmetawy f Egyptian Mythology
From the nḥm.t-ˁw3ỉ; meaning "She who embraces those in need", the name of a minor Ancient Egyptian goddess, the wife of Nehebu-kau or, occasionally, Thoth.
Neilus m Greek Mythology
Means "river valley". From the Greek neilos (νεῖλος) 'river valley'. In Greek mythology he is the eponym god of the river Nile in Egypt, the son of Titans Oceanus and Tethys, and father of Memphis, Chione, Anippe, Caliadne, and Polyxo.
Neit m Irish Mythology, Celtic Mythology
Neit likely came from the Proto-Celtic *nei-t-, meaning “impassioned” or “fighting.”... [more]
Nemain f Irish Mythology
In Irish Mythology, Nemain is the fairy spirit of the frenzied havoc of war, and possibly an aspect of Morrigan. Nemain can mean "venomous" relating it to the Proto-Celtic "nemi" meaning "dose of poison," or the Old Irish "nem" or "neimi" meaning "poison."
Nemamiah m Judeo-Christian Legend
Nemamiah is considered the angel of just causes
Nemea f Greek Mythology
The name of a naiad of the springs of the town of Nemea in Argolis, and a daughter of Asopos. Her name is taken from that place. Alternatively, Nemea may have been another name for Pandeia, a daughter of Zeus and Selene.
Nemetona f Celtic Mythology
Meaning "sacred area", from the Celtic 'nemeto', itself from 'nemeton', a term designating Gaulish religious spaces. ... [more]
Neophron m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
The first element of this name is derived from Greek νέος (neos) meaning "young, youthful" as well as "new, fresh". The second element is derived from either the Greek noun φρόνις (phronis) meaning "prudence, wisdom" or the Greek verb φρονέω (phroneo) meaning "to think" as well as "to be minded"... [more]
Nephalion m Greek Mythology
Most likely derived from the Greek adjective νηφάλιος (nephalios), which literally means "without wine, holding no wine, unmixed with wine". It refers to abstinence from intoxicating wine (i.e. physical sobriety), so a more figurative meaning of the word would be "sober, clear-headed, temperate"... [more]
Neptunine f Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Neptune used by Roman poet Catullus (64. 28) to refer to the Greek nymph Thetis, because she was a granddaughter of Poseidon, the Greek Neptune.
Nergal m Near Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
In Mesopotamian mythology he is a deity of Akkad, Assyria, and Babylonia, with the main seat of his cult at Cutha, represented by the mound of Tell-Ibrahim. He is the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and is sometimes associated with Shamash... [more]
Nerina f Greek Mythology
One of the daughter of Nereus. Means "sea nymph", "nereid", or "mermaid".
Neringa f Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
From Lithuanian legends about Neringa and Naglis. The exact origin and meaning of the name are uncertain, however some scholars believe that it is derived from Old Prussian neria "to dive (like a swimmer)."... [more]
Nerites m Greek Mythology
The god of shellfish and the charioteer of the sea. He is the only son out of the fifty Nereides, is described as being boyishly handsome and was also dearly loved by the sea creatures. In mythology, he rejected Aphrodite's invitation to Olympus, preferring his life at sea, resulting in him turning into a shellfish by a scorned Aphrodite... [more]
Nerrivik f New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
The Inuit goddess of the sea and sea animals.
Nerþuz f Ancient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Reconstructed Ancient Germanic name derived from ner ("power of life"). This is the name of a Germanic earth goddess. It is also an older form of the Old Norse (masculine) name Njǫrðr.
Nesaie f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek νησαῖος (nêsaios) meaning "insular, of an island", itself a derivative of νῆσος (nêsos) "island". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the fifty Nereids.
Neso f Greek Mythology, Astronomy
Derived from Greek νῆσος (nêsos) meaning "island". In Greek mythology this name was borne by one of the Nereids. A moon of Neptune bears this name in her honour.
Nessus m Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Nessus (Ancient Greek: Νέσσος) was a famous centaur who was killed by Heracles, and whose tainted blood in turn killed Heracles. He was the son of Centauros. He fought in the battle with the Lapiths and became a ferryman on the river Euenos... [more]
Nestoria f Greek Mythology, Medieval French, Medieval
Feminine version of Nestor. A rare example of a Greek mythological name (which was not otherwise the name of a saint) used in the early Middle Ages.
Ngeshtin-ana f Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology she is a minor goddess of wine and colde seasons known as the 'heavenly grape-vine', who is also considered a divine poet and interpreter of dreams. She is the daughter of Enki and Ninhursag, sister of Dumuzid, and consort of Ningisida.
Niab f Irish Mythology
An older form of Niamh.
Niarzina f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. It is uncertain what the meaning of her name was in the Elamite language, though the second part of her name may have been derived from Elamite sina or zini meaning "(the) lady".1 It is said that Niarzina, along with the goddesses Narundi and Shiashum, was a sister of the 'great goddess', namely Kiririsha2... [more]
Niben f Abenaki, Algonquian, New World Mythology
The Abenaki word for "summer." Niben was also a figure in Abenaki myth who represented the summer season.
Nicaea f Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nikaia. Bearers of this name include the noblewomen Nicaea of Macedon (4th century BC) and Nicaea of Corinth (3rd century BC). The latter became Queen of Macedon through her second marriage, which was with Demetrius II of Macedon.... [more]
Nicippe f Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nikippe. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology.
Nicnevin f Celtic Mythology, Folklore
From the Scottish surname Neachneohain meaning "daughter(s) of the divine". ... [more]
Nicothoë f Greek Mythology
An epithet of the Harpy Aello meaning "victory-speedy".
Nicté f Yucatec Maya, New World Mythology, Spanish (Latin American)
Means "mayflower" in Yucatec Maya.
Nihaka f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Gujarati, Assamese, Punjabi, Nepali
"whirlwind"; coming down, storm, Gangetic alligator
Nikaia f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Nikaios. In Greek mythology, Nikaia or Nicaea was a Naiad of the springs or fountain of Nikaia, a Greek colony in Bithynia (Asia Minor).
Nikkal-wa-ib f Near Eastern Mythology
The ancient Middle Eastern goddess of orchards, whose name is derived the Akkadian / West Semitic "´Ilat ´Inbi", meaning "Goddess of Fruit". Alternatively, it may mean "Great Lady and Fruitful".
Ninatta f Hurrian Mythology
In Hurrian mythology, Ninatta is one of the handmaids of the goddess Šauška.
Ningikuga f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of the pure reed" in Sumerian.... [more]
Nini f Sanskrit, Telugu, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Indian, Hinduism, Bengali, Gujarati, Nepali, Punjabi
MEANING - to lead, carry or bring towards, to offer as sacrifice, to spend ( as time) , to pour down, to incline
Ninmah f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "great queen" in Sumerian. Another name of Ninhursag. ... [more]
Ninniane f Literature, Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Celtic origin (perhaps related to Ninian). This is the name of the Lady of the Lake in the Old French Vulgate 'Lancelot' and the continuation to the Vulgate 'Merlin', known as the 'Suite du Merlin'... [more]
Ninsi'anna f & m Sumerian Mythology
Ancient Sumerian god or goddess of Venus. The name means "divine lady, illumination of heaven" or "divine lady of the redness of heaven".
Nintu f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of birth" in Sumerian. Another name of Ninhursag
Nintur f Sumerian Mythology
The name of the Sumerian mother goddess, derived from nin meaning "lady, queen" and tur meaning "hut", with allusions to the word šà-tùr meaning "womb".
Nípingr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown; possibly related to hnipinn ("drooping; downcast"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Nipun m Hinduism
Skilled in all that he attempts
Nireus m Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown.
Nirma f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Nepali, Punjabi, Telugu, Tamil
MEANING - measure, value, equivalent, to build, fabricate, create,to make
Nirmatri f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali, Bengali, Punjabi, Assamese
MEANING - Maker, Producer, Creator, authress
Nirṛti f Hinduism
Means "absence of". Nirṛti is the Hindu goddess of deathly hidden realms, sorrows, death and corruption and one of the dikpāla (guardians of the directions), representing the southwest.
Nirrti f Hinduism
The name of the Hindu goddess of deathly hidden realms and sorrows as well as the southwest direction. Her name is derived from nirhti meaning "absence of".
Nisien m Welsh Mythology
Nisien is a figure in Welsh mythology, the son of Penarddun and Euroswydd and twin brother of Efnysien.
Nisroch m Biblical Hebrew, Greek Mythology, Ancient Aramaic
Nisroch is the Assyrian god of agriculture, in whose temple king Sennacherib was worshipping when he was assassinated by his own sons in revenge for the destruction of Babylon. (2 Kings 19:37; Isa. 37:38)... [more]
Nitai f & m Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism
Means "a most merciful god".
Nitasha f Hinduism, Indian, Marathi, Hindi, Gujarati, Assamese, Bengali, Punjabi, Nepali, Indian (Christian)
MEANING - gained or obtained hope. Here नीत means gained + आशा means hope.
Níðhöggr m Norse Mythology
Means "malice striker". In Norse mythology this is the name of the dragon who lives in the pool Hvergelmir and gnaws at the roots of Yggdrasil... [more]
Niði m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse name meaning "dark one" from Old Norse nið meaning "new moon". This is also the name of a dwarf in Norse Mythology.
Niðr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "ancestor; kinsman". In Norse mythology this is one of the sons of Jarl and Erna.
Nitish m Hinduism
This is hindu name referring god Krishna. It was referred as Kamsa Samhari Nitisaha. Nice and powerful name.... [more]
Nix m Germanic Mythology
This is the name of masculine shapeshifting water spirits in Germanic mythology, who apparently derive their name from Proto-Germanic nikwus or nikwis(i) "wash". See also Nixe for the female counterpart(s).
Nix f Greek Mythology
Variant spelling of Nyx.
Nixe f Germanic Mythology
This is the name of feminine shapeshifting water spirits in Germanic mythology, who apparently derive their name from Proto-Germanic nikwus or nikwis(i) "wash". See also Nix for the male counterpart(s).
Nixie f Germanic Mythology
Variant form of Nixe.
Niyaan m Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Marathi, Indian, Tamil, Assamese
MEANING : path, access,coming or arrival... [more]
Niyaz f & m Persian, Persian Mythology, Kyrgyz
Derived from the Persian noun نیاز (niyaz) meaning "need, necessity, requirement" as well as "desire, wish". In Zoroastrianism, Niyaz is the name of a demon.... [more]
Noctiluca f Roman Mythology, Literature
From Latin noctilūca meaning "something that shines by night" - thus also "moon" and "lantern" - from nox "night" and luceo "to shine". It may be an epithet of the Roman goddess Juno... [more]
Nomia f Greek Mythology
From the name of the teen girl in The Revenge Of The Gods whose name was "Nomia".
Nomion m Greek Mythology
Most likely derived from the Greek noun νόμος (nomos) meaning "usage, custom, law, ordinance" (also see Eunomia). However, a derivation from the Greek noun νομός (nomos) meaning "place of pasturage" as well as "dwelling place" is also quite possible... [more]
Nootaikok m New World Mythology, Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Nootaikok was a god who presided over icebergs and glaciers.
Norcia f Folklore
Norcia is a female leprechaun in Tuscan folklore. Her name is a corruption of the Etruscan goddess Nortia.
Nore m & f Swedish, Norwegian (Rare), Norse Mythology
Younger form of Nóri, an Old Norse name meaning "north" (derived from norðr). In Norse mythology, Nore (sometimes Nor or Nóri) is said to be the founder of Norway... [more]
Noreia f Celtic Mythology, German (Modern, Rare), Galician (Modern, Rare)
Noreia used to be considered the epithet of an unidentified pre-Roman mother goddess who left her name in inscriptions throughout the Roman province Noricum (present-day Austria and Slovenia). Current theories suggest, however, that she might have been a Roman "creation" to gain the loyalty of the Norici (ever since Vespasian's time, she was associated with the goddess Isis and referred to as Isisi-Noreia)... [more]
Nóri m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Old Norse variant of Nórr or derived from Old Norse nóri "small person". Nóri is the name of a dwarf mentioned in the Poetic Edda.
Nórr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse norðr "north". In Norse mythology Nórr (also called Nór or Nori) was the son of Þorri, and the founder of Norway.
Norr m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Variant of Nórr. In Norse mythology Norr is the husband of Hadda.
Norðri m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Nórr. In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf who supports the vaults of heaven (formed from Ymir's skull) to the north.
Nortia f Etruscan Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nurtia. This was the name of the Etruscan goddess of fate and fortune. Her attribute is a large nail and at the beginning of the New Year a nail was driven into a wall in her sanctuary... [more]
Nosloum m Baltic Mythology
The name of a Lithuanian god or mythical being recorded in writings by Jesuit monks dating back to the era between 1580 and 1620.... [more]
Nótt f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Means "night" in Old Norse. She was the personification of the night in Norse mythology.
Nox m & f English (Rare), Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin nox "night", Nox is the Roman equivalent of Greek Nyx. As an English name, it is a variant of Knox.
Nüba f Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From a combination of the characters 女 (nü, meaning “female, woman”) and 魃 (ba, meaning “drought spirit”). This is the name of a mythological figure mentioned in the Shanhaijing (山海经), or Classic of Mountains and Seas... [more]
Nuit f English (British), Egyptian Mythology
Nuit is the Ancient Egyptian goddess of the heavens, with her name meaning "sky." Originally she was only the goddess of the night sky, but gradually she came to represent the sky in general. Nuit also protects people in the afterlife... [more]
Nujalik f Inuit Mythology
In Inuit mythology, Nujalik is the goddess of hunting on land. She is the opposite of the goddess of sea, Sedna.
Nuliajuk f Inuit Mythology
Inuit goddess of the sea and sea animals, also known as Sedna.
Numbernip m Germanic Mythology
Congenial English translation of the German name Rübezahl.
Numeria f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin numerus meaning "number". In Roman mythology, Numeria is the goddess who grants young children the ability to count.
Nun-baršegunu f Sumerian Mythology
Means "lady whose body is the flecked barley". This was an alternative name of the Sumerian deity Nidaba, the goddess of grain and writing.
Nundina f Roman Mythology
Nundina presides over the dies lustricus, the purification day when the child was given a name (praenomen). This occurred on the eighth day for girls and the ninth day for boys, a difference Plutarch explains by noting that "it is a fact that the female grows up, and attains maturity and perfection before the male." Until the umbilical cord fell off, typically on the seventh day, the baby was regarded as "more like a plant than an animal," as Plutarch expresses it... [more]
Nữ-oa f Far Eastern Mythology
Vietnamese form of Nuwa.
Nuribotoke m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 塗 (nuri) meaning "paint" combined with 仏 (botoke) meaning "Buddha". ... [more]
Nuriel m Hebrew, Judeo-Christian Legend
Apparently means either "light of God" (compare Arabic Nur) or "fire of God" in Hebrew. This is the name of an angel in the Zohar, a Kabbalistic text.
Nurtia f Etruscan Mythology
Etruscan form of Nortia.
Nusa-kor-kamuy m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of the dead who occasionally serves as a messenger to the other Kamuy.
Nut f Egyptian Mythology
Means "sky".... [more]
Nuta f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Punjabi, Bengali, Nepali, Gujarati
"praised"; "commended "
Nutana f Hinduism
MEANING : New, modern, fresh... [more]
Nüwa f Far Eastern Mythology
The mother goddess in Chinese mythology. Her name is derived from 女 (nu) meaning "female, woman" and 媧 (wa), of uncertain origin which may simply refer to the goddess herself.
Nuying f Far Eastern Mythology
Means "maiden bloom". In Chinese folk religion, she and her twin sister, Ehuang, are goddesses or spirits of the Xiang River.
Nyai Loro Kidul f Far Eastern Mythology
The name of an Indonesia sea goddess, also known as Queen of the Southern Sea. Her name is derived from the honorific nyai, loro meaning "two", and kidul meaning "south, southern"... [more]
Nyas m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Nepali, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam
MEANING: putting down or in, placing, applying, impressing, drawing, painting, putting away, ... [more]
Nycteïs f Greek Mythology
Means "daughter of night" in Ancient Greek.
Nycteus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Νυκτεύς (Nykteus), which was derived from Greek νύξ nyx meaning "night". In Greek mythology, Nycteus was the name of a king of Thebes.
Nyctimene f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek νύξ (nyx) meaning "night" and μενω (meno) "to last, to withstand". A daughter of Epopeus, king of Lesbos, or, according to others, of Nycteus. Pursued and dishonored by her amorous father, she hid herself in the shade of forests, where she was metamorphosed by Athena into an owl.
Nyctimus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nyktimos. In Greek mythology, this is the name of the youngest of the fifty sons of king Lycaon of Arcadia.
Nýi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Nýr. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Nyktimos m Greek Mythology
Either a monothematic name that is derived from the Greek noun νύξ (nyx) meaning "night", or a theophoric dithematic name that is derived from the name of the Greek goddess Nyx combined with the Greek verb τιμάω (timao) meaning "to honour, to esteem, to revere".... [more]
Nympha f Roman Mythology, Ancient Greek (Latinized), German (Bessarabian)
Latinized form of the Greek name Νυμφη (Nymphe) meaning "bride". Nymphe was one of the twelve Horae, Greek goddesses of the hours, who presided over the "bath-hour". In the New Testament, Saint Paul mentions either Nympha or Nymphas in one of his epistles... [more]
Nýr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "new; young". This is the name of a dwarf (also called Nár) in Norse mythology.
Nýráðr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from nýr ("new, fresh") and ráð ("advice, counsel, decision"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Nyrcia f Etruscan Mythology
The Etruscan goddess of fate and chance, who changes the inevitable and rewrites the past and future.
Nysa f Greek Mythology
Possibly from an archaic Greek word meaning "tree". In Greek mythology Nysa was a daughter of Aristaeus, who was believed to have brought up the infant god Dionysus, and from whom one of the many towns of the name of Nysa was believed to have derived its name.
Ob m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Bengali, Marathi
Name : Ob ओब... [more]
Oba f Yoruba, African Mythology
Means "king, ruler" in Yoruba. It can refer to Obaluaye, a spirit associated with infectious disease and healing.
Obatala m African Mythology
In the religion of the Yoruba people, Obàtálá is the creator of human bodies, which were supposedly brought to life by Olorun's breath. Obàtálá is also the owner of all ori or heads... [more]
Ochimos m Greek Mythology
Probably derived from the Greek verb ὀχέω (ocheo) meaning "to bear, to carry, to hold fast, to sustain", which is closely related to the Greek verb ἔχω (echo) meaning "to have, to hold, to possess"... [more]
Ochimus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ochimos. In Greek mythology, Ochimus was the eldest of the Heliadae and lived on the island of Rhodes, of which he was also the king.
Ochopintre m Georgian Mythology
Combination of ოჭო (ocho) which is related to the name of the god Bochi and პინტრე (pintre) which is related to the Greek god Pan... [more]
Ocridion m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Okridion. In Greek mythology, Ocridion is the name of a mortal man who was engaged to Cydippe before she was stolen from him by her uncle Cercaphus.
Ocypete f Greek Mythology
Means "swift wing". This is the name of a Harpy in Greek mythology, also known as Ocypode and Ocythoe.
Ocypode f Greek Mythology
Means "swift foot". This is another name of the harpy Ocypete in Greek mythology.
Ocyrhoe f Greek Mythology
Derived from ὠκῠ́ς (ōkús) meaning "quick, swift" and rheos (ῥέος) meaning "stream".
Ocythoe f Greek Mythology
Means "swift runner". This is another name for the harpy Ocypete.
Od Ana f Mythology
Turkic and Mongolian goddess of fire and marriage, derived from od meaning "fire" and ana meaning "mother".
Odani f Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Bengali, Hinduism
Name: Odani ओदनी... [more]
Odav m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, Bengali, Marathi, Nepali, Sinhalese
MEANING - "mode which consists of five notes only"... [more]
Odika f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil
MEANING - wild rice... [more]
Odma m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Sinhalese
Odm /Odma ओद्म means- moistening, act of wetting. ... [more]
Oduduwa m African Mythology
Oduduwa, Olofin Adimula, Emperor and First Suzerain of the Yoruba, was the Oba of Ile-Ife. His name is generally ascribed to the ancestral dynasty of Yorubaland due to the fact that he is held by the Yoruba to have been the ancestor of their numerous crowned kings... [more]
Oeneus m Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology he was a Calydonian king. He sent his son, the hero Meleager, out to find heroes to kill the Calydonian Boar, which was ravaging Calydon because Oeneus had forgotten to honor Artemis at the harvest ceremonies... [more]
Oenoe f Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek feminine name meaning "winy".
Oenopion m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Oinopion. In Greek mythology, Oenopion was a king of the island of Chios.
Oeonus m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "omen, portent".
Ogan m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Bengali (Hindu), Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil
MEANING :assembled, united, standing alone
Ogh m Indian, Sanskrit, Nepali, Hinduism, Telugu, Kannada, Punjabi, Gujarati
Means "flood" in Hindi.
Ogha f Hinduism
Name: Ogha ओघा... [more]
Oghavaan m Hinduism
Name - Oghavaan ओघवान्... [more]
Oghavat m Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism, Hindi, Nepali
Oghavat ओघवत् means - having a strong stream ... [more]
Ogun m African Mythology
The god of thunder in Yoruba mythology.
Oha f Sanskrit, Indian, Tamil, Telugu, Sinhalese, Hindi, Punjabi, Kannada, Hinduism, Nepali, Bengali
Name : Ohaa / Oha ओहा... [more]
Oifa f Celtic Mythology
Oifa was the sister of Ove in Celtic mythology. Pronounced IY-fah
Óinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from óa-sk ("to be frightened"). In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf and a kenning for "snake".
Oinopion m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek adjective οἰνωπός (oinopos) meaning "wine-coloured, wine-dark" as well as "wine-coloured in complexion" or "ruddy-complexioned". The word is ultimately derived from the Greek noun οινος (oinos) meaning "wine"... [more]
Oinotros m Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek οἶνος (oinos) meaning "wine" and τρέπω (trepo) "to turn (towards a thing)", perhaps meaning "addicted to wine". In Greek mythology this was borne by a son of Lycaon who went to Italy and became the eponymous king of Oenotria.
Oizys f Greek Mythology
Means "misery, woe, or distress." Oizys was the spirit of misery and woe, distress and suffering. She was one of the malevolent children of Nyx.
Ojas m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Assamese, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bengali, Malayalam
MEANING - bodily strength, vital energy, splendoustrength, manifestation, appearance, vitality, power,
Ojasi f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali
MEANING;: vigorous , Splendourous , Shine
Ojayit m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Bengali, Nepali, Sinhalese
MEANING : courageous behavior, stout heartedness
Ojmana f Indian, Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali, Sinhalese, Gujarati, Malayalam, Kannada
Name: Ojmana ओज्मना... [more]
Okaja f Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Hinduism, Tamil, Nepali, Sinhalese, Gujarati, Bengali
Name: Okaja ओकजा... [more]
Okeoma m & f African Mythology
Okeoma meaning good gift from God
Okinagatarashi f Japanese Mythology
In Japanese mythology, this was Empress Jingu's name before she took the throne. Her name is derived from the honorific o, meaning "breath", meaning "long, long time, everlasting, increasing", , refering to the obi on a kimono, or "belt, band", meaning "equal, match, comparison" and meaning "to sell".
Okridion m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ὀκρίδες (okrides), which is the plural form of Greek ὄκρις (okris) meaning "peak, point" (which is often in reference to a mountain top). Also compare the Greek adjective ὀκριοειδής (okrioeides) meaning "rugged, jagged".
Okyrhoe f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
OKYRHOE (Ocyrhoe) was a Naiad-nymph of the Aegean island of Samos. She was pursued by the god Apollon and when she tried to flee from the island, he turned the boat to stone and the sailor into a pilot-fish... [more]
Olodumare m & f African Mythology
The "creator" manifestation of Olorun
Olofi m & f African Mythology
A manifestation of Olorun which acts as the conduit between Orun (Heaven) and Ayé (Earth).