Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in mythology and religion.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Batara Guru m Indonesian Mythology
From Indonesian batara meaning "god, deity", ultimately from Sanskrit भट्टार (bhattara), and guru meaning "teacher", ultimately from Sanskrit गुरु (guru)... [more]
Batara Sambu m Indonesian Mythology
From Indonesian batara meaning "god, deity" and sambu of uncertain meaning, possibly from Sanskrit शंभु (śambhu) meaning "sage, venerable man". In Javanese mythology, he is the god of teachers and a son of Batara Guru.
Baterez m Caucasian Mythology
East Circassian (Kabardian) form of Batradz.
Bathala m Philippine Mythology
Means "god, deity" in Tagalog, derived from Sanskrit भट्टार (bhaṭṭāra) meaning "holy, honourable, venerable" (through a transmission from Malay betara). In native Tagalog mythology, Bathala is the deity who created the universe... [more]
Baði m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Diminutive of names containing the element bǫð "battle". In Norse mythology this is the name of a Jotunn.
Batia f Greek Mythology
The name of a naiad of the town of Sparta in Lakedaimonia who married an early Spartan king, Oibalos. Her name is possibly derived from the word βατεο (bateo) meaning "covering".
Batradz m Ossetian, Caucasian Mythology
Alternate transcription of Batraz.
Baucis f Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Derived from Greek βαυκος (baukos) meaning "prudish". In Greek mythology, Baucis and Philemon were an elderly couple who showed great hospitality to the god Zeus. Baucis was also the name of a Greek poet contemporaneous with Sappho and Erinna whose work is now lost, apostrophized in Erinna's 'Distaff'.
Baudihillia f Germanic Mythology
A minor Germanic goddess known from inscriptions in Northern England.
Baugi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Baugr. This was the name of a jotunn in Norse mythology.
Beanstan m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
The father of Breca in the epic Beowulf.
Bebryce f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βεβρύκη (Bebryke). In Greek legend Bebryke or Bebryce, otherwise called Βρύκη (Bryke) or Bryce, was one of the Danaids. The Bebryces, a mythical tribe of people living in Bithynia (a region of Asia Minor also known as Bebrycia), were said to be named for Bebryce (or else for a hero named Bebryx or Bebrycus).
Bec f Irish Mythology (?)
Allegedly an older form of Irish beag "small".... [more]
Bécuma f Irish Mythology
Means "troubled lady", from Old Irish "woman" and a second element, perhaps chuma, meaning "grief, sorrow, wound". In Irish legend she was a woman who "dwelt in the Land of Promise and had an affair with Gaiar, a son of Manannán mac Lir, the sea-god... [more]
Bedukhæ f Ossetian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Bedukhæ is a character in the Nart epics and a beautiful Nart woman who falls in love with Sosruko.
Beecram m Indian, Hinduism
Variant transcription of Bikram (Hindi: विक्रम)?
Beejal m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali, Bengali, Punjabi, Assamese
"Seedy" ; "furnished with seed or grains"
Beira f Literature, Celtic Mythology
Anglicized form of Bheur or Bhuer perhaps meaning "cutting, sharp, shrill" in Scottish Gaelic, from Cailleach Bheur "sharp old wife", the name of the Scottish personification of winter, a reference to wintry winds... [more]
Belatucadros m Celtic Mythology
Often translated as "fair shining one" or "fair slayer", derived in part from Celtic *bel(l)- "strong, powerful" or *belo- "bright" (cf. Belenus)... [more]
Belena f Ancient Celtic, German, Danish, Celtic Mythology
Latinized feminine form of Belenus. Belena was the wife of the Gaulish solar god Belenus and the goddess of the sun and the beginning summer.
Beleth m Judeo-Christian Legend
In demonology, Beleth also spelled Bilet, Bileth, Byleth and Bilith is a mighty and terrible king of Hell, who has eighty-five legions of demons under his command.
Belet-ili f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of the gods" or "mother of the gods" in Akkadian. It is another name for Ninhursag.
Belet-seri f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of an underworld goddess who was tasked with recording information about the dead entering the afterlife. The first part of her name comes from beltu meaning "lady, mistress" and the second part may come from sartu meaning "crime, lies" or sertu meaning "morning", "bar (part of a lock)" or "punishment".
Beli m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse belja "to roar". This is the name of a jotunn in Norse mythology.
Belisama f Celtic Mythology
Belisama was a goddess worshipped in ancient Gaul and Britain, associated with lakes and rivers, fire, crafts and light, who was identified with Minerva in the interpretatio romana... [more]
Bellerophon m Greek Mythology
Alternate form of Bellerophontes. In Greek mythology this was the name of a hero known for taming the winged horse Pegasus and slaying the monster Chimera.
Bellerophontes m Greek Mythology
Possibly means "slayer of the demon Belleros", from the name Belleros and -φόντης (-phontes) "killer of", which is related to φόνος (phonos) "murder, slaughter" (compare Ἀργειφόντης (Argeiphontes) "slayer of Argus", an epithet of Hermes)... [more]
Belphegor m Judeo-Christian Legend
From Ba'al Pe'or, the name of a Semitic god mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, meaning "Ba'al of Mount Pe'or" or "lord of the opening". In Christian demonology this is the name of a demon that represents the deadly sin of sloth.
Belus m Greek Mythology
King of Egypt and brother of Aegyptus and Danaus in Greek Mythology.
Benthesicyme f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek βενθος (benthos) meaning "depth of the sea" and κύμα (kyma) "waves, swells". She was a goddess of waves, a nymph of Ethiopia, the daughter of Poseidon and wife of an Ethiopian king.
Benzaiten f Japanese Mythology
The name of a Japanese goddess, often considered to be the Japanese form of Saraswati. Her name is derived from 弁 (ben) meaning "dialect, discrimination, petal", 才 (zai) meaning "ability, talent" or 財 (zai) meaning "property, riches, wealth" and 天 (ten) meaning "the sky, heavens".
Berezko f Basque Mythology
The natural form of Aide as oppose to Aideko, the supernatural form
Bergelmir m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from berg "rock, cliff, highlands" and galmr "shouting one". This is the name of Ymir's grandson, the ancestor of the frost giants.
Beri-bera m Georgian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Beri-Bera was an agricultural god of fertility, harvests, and animals. He is worshiped in eastern Georgia with a festival held at the end of the year.
Beržas m Lithuanian, Folklore, Popular Culture
Derived from the Lithuanian noun beržas meaning "birch tree". In Lithuanian folklore and popular culture, Beržas is the name of one of the three sons of the titular character of the folk tale Eglė žalčių karalienė, which translates to English as Eglė, the Queen of Serpents.
Bestla f Norse Mythology, Astronomy
Bestla is a giantess in Norse Mythology. She is married to Borr and mother of Odin, Vili and ... [more]
Bétéide f Irish Mythology
Means "wanton lady" in Irish Gaelic, from "woman" and téide "wantonness" (see Téide). In Irish legend she is a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann, daughter of the goddess Flidais and sister of the witch-like Bé Chuille.
Bethlehem f & m Judeo-Christian Legend, English (American, Rare), Biblical, Ethiopian (Rare), English (British)
From the two Hebrew words bayta "house" and lachem "bread". Bethlehem is the name of a Palestinian city. In the Bible, it is the place where Jesus was born.
Betkil m Georgian (Rare), Georgian Mythology, Folklore
Meaning unknown. It is possibly of Svan origin, since Betkil is the name of a tragic protagonist from a Svan folk song.... [more]
Beyla f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Younger form of the reconstructed Proto-Norse name Baunila. In Norse mythology, Beyla is a servant of Freyr with her husband Bryggvir.
Bezlea f Baltic Mythology (Latinized)
The name of an alleged Lithuanian goddess of the evening.... [more]
Bhadra f Hinduism
Etymology unknown. This is the name of a Hindu goddess of the hunt and hunting, companion of the goddess Durga.
Bhatta f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Malayalam
Name : Bhatta भट्टा... [more]
Bhavin m Hinduism
"one who is expressive; Bhaav = expression, also sometimes used to mean emotion, in many Indian languages"... [more]
Bia f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek Βία (bia) "power, force, might". In Greek mythology, Bia is the personification of force, anger and raw energy.
Bienor m Greek Mythology
Variant of Bianor. This is the name of several characters from Greek mythology, one of which is a centaur.
Biflindi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse bifa "story" and lind "lime-tree" or bif "movement; air; water" and lind. This is another name for Odin.
Bifliði m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Combination of bif 'movement', 'air', 'water' and liði 'one who goes', 'one who fares'. Bifliði is a name for Óðinn.
Bifur m Germanic Mythology, Literature
The name of a dwarf in The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.... [more]
Bifurr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from German biber or bever both meaning "beaver", or an Old Norse name meaning "the quaking one". In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf.
Bijal f Hinduism
bijal means the richel,sine.... [more]
Bil f & m Norse Mythology, Old Swedish, Norwegian, Medieval English
Means "instant" in Old Norse. In Norse Mythology, Bil and her brother Hjúki follow Máni across the heavens.
Bíldr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse bíldr, a knife for blood-letting. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Billingr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse billingr "twin" or from Ancient Germanic bhi- "two-, double-" and -ingr, a suffix denoting "belonging to" or "descended from". In Norse mythology this is the name of both a dwarf and a giant, the latter of whom is the father of a girl Odin wants to seduce.
Bilqis f Judeo-Christian Legend, Arabic (?), Pakistani (?)
Arabic name for the queen of Sheba, a biblical figure.... [more]
Bilrǫst m Norse Mythology
Means "fleetingly glimpsed rainbow", derived from Old Norse bil ("moment"). This is the original name for the Bifrǫst.
Bisal m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Hinduism, Kannada, Odia
Name - Bisal बिसल... [more]
Bithnanaia f Near Eastern Mythology
Bithnanaia was a Parthian goddess, the daughter of Konon.
Bjǫlr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Younger form of Belwar. In Norse mythology this was the name of a jǫtunn.
Bjǫrt f Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Female form of Bjartr. This is the name of one of Menglǫð's maids in Norse mythology.
Blapþvari m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "babbling pole; staff". This is the name of a Jotunn in Norse mythology.
Blóðughadda f Norse Mythology
Means "the one with the bloody hair". The bloody hair is supposedly referring to red sea foam. In Norse mythology, Blóðughadda was the daughter of Ægir and Rán.
Blǫvurr m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Related to Norwegian blava "to shine". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Boann f Irish Mythology
Goddess of the river Boyne.
Bochi m Georgian Mythology
Probably from Mingrelian ბოჩი (bochi) meaning "(male) goat, sheep". In Georgian mythology this was the name of a patron god of cattle.
Bodb m Irish Mythology
In Irish mythology, Bodb Derg was a son of Eochaid Garb or the Dagda, and the Dagda's successor as King of the Tuatha Dé Danann.
Boddi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Possibly a variant of Baði. Related to Icelandic budda "money-bag" and Norwegian boddi "newborn pet". In Norse mythology Boddi is one of the sons of Karl and Snør.
Bodhana f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Tamil, Indian, Hindi, Bengali, Malayalam
MEANING : intellect, Knowledge, enlighening, causing to awake or expand
Bodhani f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Bengali, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali, Sinhalese
MEANING : intellect , Knowledge, Teaching, exciting
Bǫfarr m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Meaning unknown; possibly related to Bófi. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Bofur m Literature, Germanic Mythology
A character created by J.R.R. Tolkien in 'The Hobbit'. Bofur is a Dwarf in Thorin's Company who is related to Bifur and Bombur... [more]
Bolina f Greek Mythology
Bolina was the nymph of the town of Bolina of Greece.
Bǫlþorn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Old Norse combination of bǫl 'bale', 'misfortune'; 'sin'; 'arrow' and þorn 'thorn, spike, thorn-bush'. Bǫlþorn is a jǫtunn, He is the father of Bestla.
Bǫlverkr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Old Norse name meaning "evil-doer, malefactor" with the combination of bǫl "misfortune", "evil", "bale" and verk "work, piece of work, business, deed". Bǫlverkr is another name for Óðinn who is a character in Norse Mythology.
Bombur m Literature, Germanic Mythology
A Dwarf in J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Hobbit." A relative of Bifur and Bofur, and the fattest of the Dwarves in Thorin's company.... [more]
Bǫmburr m Norse Mythology
Related to bimbult ("bumpy; uneasy"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Bóndi m Old Danish, Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Variant of Bóandi. This is the name of one of Karl and Snør's sons in Norse mythology.
Borbeth f Germanic Mythology
"Sister goddess" of Embeth and Wilbeth and one of "The Three Bethen" or "Three Virgins", a group of allegedly pre-Christian goddesses who later became "unofficial" saints.... [more]
Borkhuarali m Ossetian Mythology
This is the name of the Ossetian god of cereals and grain and the son of Khorældar. He was killed by Batraz, causing the Narts to fall to famine.
Borr m Norse Mythology
Possibly means "son" in Old Norse. Borr is a deity in Norse Mythology. He is married to Bestla, father of Odin, Vili and , and son of Búri.
Borvo m Celtic Mythology
In Lusitanian and Celtic polytheism, Borvo was a healing deity associated with bubbling spring water.
Borysthenis f Greek Mythology
Etymology unknown, probably derived from the masculine name Borysthenes.
Boukolion m Greek Mythology
Diminutive form of Boukolos, as this name contains the Greek diminutive suffix -ιων (-ion).
Boukolos m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek βουκόλος (boukolos) meaning "cowherd, herdsman", which is ultimately derived from Greek βοῦς (bous) meaning "cow, ox, bull". Also compare the Greek verb βουκολέω (boukoleo) meaning "to tend cattle".
Brana f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse brattr "steep". This is the name of a jotunn in Norse mythology.
Brandingi m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Brandgengi. This is the name of a Jotunn in Norse mythology.
Brandubh m Irish Mythology
Means "black raven" in Irish. In Irish legend this was a board game played by the heroes and gods. It was also the name of a king of Leinster (whom the 'Annals of Ulster' say died in 604); he was a good friend of Mongán of the Dál nAraidi but coveted Mongán's wife, Dubh Lacha... [more]
Breca m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Breca (sometimes spelled Breoca) was a Bronding who, according to the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, was Beowulf’s childhood friend.
Breiðr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "broad; wide". This is the name of one of Karl and Snør's sons in Norse mythology.
Breksta f Baltic Mythology (Latinized)
An alleged Lithuanian goddess.... [more]
Bremusa f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βρεμουσα (Bremousa), which allegedly meant "raging woman" from Greek βρέμω (bremo) "to roar, shout, rage". This was the name of one of the twelve Amazon warriors who followed Penthesilea into the Trojan War.
Breoca m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Alternate spelling of Breca, a character from Beowulf.
Bricta f Celtic Mythology
Bricta or Brixta was a Gaulish goddess who was a consort of Luxovius. It has, however, been suggested that if "Bricta is a title incorporating Bríg, it may actually be a title assigned to Sirona rather than a separate goddess"... [more]
Brigantia f Celtic Mythology
Derived from Celtic *brigant- "high" or *briga- "might, power". This was the name of an important Brythonic goddess. She is almost certainly the same deity as Bridget, the Irish goddess.
Brihaspati m & f Hinduism, Indian, Bengali, Hindi
From Sanskrit बृहस्पति (bṛhaspati) meaning "Jupiter (the planet)" or "Thursday". This is the name of a Hindu deity of piety and religious devotion who is often identified with the planet Jupiter.
Brimir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse brim ("surf, surge"). This is another name for Ymir in Norse mythology.
Briseus m Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek βρίθω (britho) or (vritho), which can mean "to be laden with, to abound" as well as "to be heavy". In Greek mythology, Briseus was the father of Briseis.
Britomartis f Greek Mythology
Possibly means "sweet maiden", from Cretan βριτύ (britu) "sweet" or "blessing" (Attic glyku) and martis "maiden" (Attic parthenos). This was an epithet of a Cretan goddess of mountains and hunting who was sometimes identified with Artemis.
Brixia f Celtic Mythology
Contracted form of Brigantia.
Brizo f Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek goddess who was known as the protector of mariners, sailors, and fishermen as well as a prophet specializing in the interpretation of dreams.... [more]
Bronte f Greek Mythology
From Ancient Greek βροντή ‎(brontḗ) meaning "thunder". She is the Greek goddess of thunder and the sister of Astrape. She was one of the Cyclops, who forged Zeus' thunderbolts/lightning bolts.
Bruin m Dutch (Rare), English (Rare, ?), Folklore
Dutch form of Bruno. It coincides with the Dutch word for "brown". This was also the name of the bear in medieval fables of Reynard the Fox.
Brúni m Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Variant of Brúnn. This is the name of a dwarf and another name for Odin in Norse mythology.
Bucolion m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Boukolion. This was the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a king of Arcadia.
Bucolus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Boukolos. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being the son of Hippocoon, a king of Sparta.
Buddhish m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Gujarati, Assamese, Nepali
"lord of wisdom " ; "lord of intelligence ". Here बुद्धि means wisdom + ईश means lord
Budeia f Greek Mythology
Means "oxen-yoker" in Greek. It is the name of a daughter of Lycus in Greek mythology.
Buga f Croatian (Rare), Slavic Mythology
From the verb bugariti meaning ‘'to sing'’.... [more]
Búri m Norse Mythology
Of uncertain meaning. Búri was the first god in Norse mythology. He is the father of Borr and grandfather of Odin, Vili and .
Buri m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from burr (a poetical word for "son"). This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Burinn m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Buri. This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
Burr m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse burr meaning "son". Burr is a giant in the Northern mythology. He is the son of Búri and the father of Óðinn, Vili and ... [more]
Buðli m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from boð ("bid, offer"). In Norse mythology Buðli is a Swedish king and the father of Brynhildr.
Byblis f Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Byblis was the daughter of Miletus, who fell in love with her twin brother Caunus.
Byggvir m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "seed corn". In Norse mythology Byggvir is a servant of Freyr and the husband of Beyla.
Býleistr m Norse Mythology
Means "bee-lightning" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology he is Loki's brother.
Bylgja f Faroese, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Feminine name taken from the Old Norse word bylgja meaning "billow, wave". In Norse Mythology, Bylgja was one of the nine daughters of the sea deities Ægir and Rán.
Byzas m Greek Mythology
Derived from Thracian búzas "he-goat, buck" (similar to Indo-European bhugo "buck" and Greek bous "ox, cow"); since Thracian was not a Hellenic language, one could probably call Byzas a hellenization of sorts... [more]
Cabeiro f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant of Cabiro, the Latinized form of Kabeiro. This was the name of a nymph in Greek mythology.
Cabrakan m Mayan Mythology
Means "earthquake" in Mayan. Cabrakan was the god of mountains and earthquakes.
Cadhan m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Gaelic byname meaning "barnacle goose". In Irish legend Cadhan was a hero who slayed a monster with the help of his hound.
Cadwy m Welsh Mythology
From Old Welsh cad "battle" combined with the suffix wy. This was borne by the son of Geraint in Arthurian legend.
Cadyryeith m Welsh Mythology
This name appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
Caeculus m Roman Mythology
Derived from the Latin adjective caecus meaning "blind" combined with the Latin masculine diminutive suffix -ulus. Also compare the related name Caecilius.... [more]
Caelifer m Roman Mythology
From a poetic Latin epithet of the Greek god Atlas which meant "supporting the heavens", from caelum "heaven" and ferre "to bear, to carry, to bring"... [more]
Caelus m Roman Mythology
The name of the god of the sky in Roman mythology. Meaning "sky" or "the heavens." Origin of the English word "celestial"
Caeneus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kaineus. This was the name of several characters from Greek mythology, one of which was a hero of the legendary Lapith people of Thessaly... [more]
Caenis f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Roman
Latinized form of Kainis. In Greek mythology, Caenis was a woman who was raped by the god Poseidon. Afterwards, he promised her that he would grant her a single wish... [more]
Caerus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kairos. In Greek mythology, Caerus was the personification of opportunity, luck and favorable moments.
Caieta f Roman Mythology
The name of Aeneas's wet-nurse in the Aeneid.... [more]
Caílte m Irish, Irish Mythology
Older form of Caoilte, possibly derived from Irish caol meaning "slender". In Irish legend Caílte was a warrior of the Fianna and their foremost poet... [more]
Cairenn f Irish Mythology
In medieval Irish legends, this name was borne by the mother of Niall of the Nine Hostages, a concubine of King Eochu (or Eochaid). She was treated harshly by his jealous wife Queen Mongfind, but later rescued by her son.
Caiva f Celtic Mythology, Germanic Mythology
Caiva was a goddess who was worshipped in Gerolstein in present-day Germany. It has been speculated that she might have been a mother goddess.
Cakulha m New World Mythology
One of the Mayan gods of lightning.
Calais m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κάλαϊς (Kalais), which meant "turquoise" or "chrysolite" (being the name of "a precious stone of a greenish blue"). In Greek myth Calais and his twin brother Zetes, together known as the Boreads (being sons of Boreas, god of the north wind), were Argonauts.
Calchas m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κάλχας (Kalchas), which is perhaps derived from Greek χαλκός (chalkos) "bronze". Calchas was a seer featured in Homer's 'Iliad', famous for correctly predicting many events of the Trojan War... [more]
Caliadne f Greek Mythology
Means "beautiful and holy". From the Greek kalos (καλή) 'beautiful' and adnos (αδνος) 'holy'. In Greek mythology she is a naiad of the river Nile in Egypt, a daughter of the god of the Nile, Neilus... [more]
Callianassa f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kallianassa. In Greek mythology, this is the name of one of the Nereids.
Callidice f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Καλλιδίκη (Kallidike), which is derived from Greek καλλος (kallos) "beauty" combined with Greek δικη (dike) meaning "justice, judgement" as well as "custom, usage"... [more]
Callithoe f Greek Mythology
Derived from kαλλι (kalli) meaning "beautiful" and θοή (thoe) meaning "swift".
Callithyia f Greek Mythology
Derived from kαλλι meaning "beautiful" and likely θυία (thuia) referring to the Juniperus foetidissima plant or θύον (thuon) meaning "cypress-pine".
Calmana f Judeo-Christian Legend, Literature
Latinized form of Kalmana, the name of Cain's wife and twin sister in Judeo-Christian legend (e.g., found in the (first Greek redaction of the) 'Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius', written in Syriac in the late 7th century)... [more]
Camael m Judeo-Christian Legend
Apparently means "he who sees God" in Hebrew. This is the name of an angel who is often listed as being one of the seven archangels.
Camazotz m Mayan Mythology
Camazotz represented bats in Mayan mythology. Bats were considered symbols of rebirth and the underworld.
Camena f Roman Mythology
Goddess who enables the child to sing.
Camulos m Celtic Mythology, Gaulish
Derived from Gaulish *camulos "champion; servant". Camulos was an important god of early Great Britain and Gaul, especially among the Belgae and the Remi, who the Romans equated with Mars.
Canace f Greek Mythology
Daughter of Aeolus and Enarete, and lover of Poseidon. In another, more famous version Canace was a lover not of Poseidon, but of her own brother Macareus... [more]
Candelifera f Roman Mythology
The cyclical place of the goddess Candelifera, "She who bears the candle," is uncertain. It is sometimes thought that she provides an artificial light for labor that occurs at night. A long labor was considered likely for first-time mothers, so at least a part of the birthing process would occur at night... [more]
Caneque f & m New World Mythology
A Mayan name meaning roughly, 'mischievous forest spirit.' Appears in local mythology.
Canethus m Greek Mythology
Etymology uncertain, but it may be linked to κανθός (kanthos) meaning "eyelid, corner of the eye".
Cangjie m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
In Chinese mythology, Cangjie was a retainer of the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan) who invented written Chinese characters. According to legend, his invention caused ghosts to cry in the night and the sky to rain millet... [more]
Canthus m Greek Mythology
Derived from κανθός (kanthos) meaning "eyelid, corner of the eye".
Capaneus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Καπανεύς (Kapaneus), which is possibly derived from Greek καπάνη (kapanē) meaning "chariot". It could also have been derived from Greek κάπη (kapē) meaning "crib, manger" or even from Greek κᾶπος (kapos), which can mean "plot of land, garden" as well as "breath"... [more]
Capricornus m Roman Mythology, Astronomy
Means "goat" in Latin. The name of one of the constellations of the zodiac.
Carmanor m Greek Mythology
Greek demi-god of the harvest
Carmenta f Roman Mythology
From Latin carmen "song, verse, enchantment, religious formula", from canere "to sing" (the notion is of chanting or reciting verses of magical power). In Roman legend Carmenta was a goddess of prophecy and childbirth, the mother of Evander by Mercury... [more]
Carna f Roman Mythology
The goddess who makes strong muscles, and defends the internal organs from witches or strigae.
Carpo f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Astronomy
Latinized form of Greek Καρπώ (Karpô), which is derived from Greek καρπόω (karpoô) "to bear fruit; to reap or enjoy fruit". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Horae or Seasons; Carpo was the goddess of autumn and of the harvest, that is, the fruits of summer... [more]
Carystus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Karystos. In Greek mythology, Carystus is the name of a rural demi-god that is native to the Greek island of Euboia. He also lent his name to the ancient Euboian city-state of Carystus.
Castalia f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κασταλία (Kastalia), which is of uncertain origin, possibly related to Greek καθαρός (katharos) meaning "clean, spotless, pure" or κασσύω (kassuô) "to stitch"... [more]
Castiel m English, Judeo-Christian Legend, Popular Culture
Means "shield of God" in Hebrew via El theophory in the Bible, which is the practice of embedding the name of a god or a deity in, usually, a proper name. Castiel is sometimes considered a variant of Cassiel... [more]
Caswallon m Welsh Mythology
Welsh form of Cassivellaunus. According to Welsh myth, he was a son of Beli Mawr.
Catius m Roman Mythology
God invoked for sharpening the minds of children as they develop intellectually
Catreus m Greek Mythology
Means "down-flowing" in Ancient Greek. In Greek mythology, this was a king of Crete and a son of Minos and Pasiphaë.
Caturix m Gaulish, Celtic Mythology
Derived from Gaulish catu meaning "battle" combined with Gaulish rix meaning "king".... [more]
Cauac m New World Mythology
A name found in Mayan mythology and representing the South.
Cecrops m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κέκροψ (Kékrops), which is probably derived from Greek κέκραγμα (kekragma) meaning "scream, cry" combined with Greek οψ (ops) meaning "voice"... [more]
Cedalion m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κηδαλίων (Kedalion), of which the meaning is not entirely certain. It could have been derived from Greek κηδαλιζω (kedalizô) meaning "purifying, cleansing"... [more]
Céladon m Literature, Greek Mythology (Gallicized)
French form of Celadon. This was the name of a character in the French pastoral novel 'L'Astrée' by Honoré d'Urfé, published between 1607 and 1627.
Celadon m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κελάδων (Keladôn), derived from κέλαδος (kelados) which meant "a noise as of rushing waters; loud noise, din, clamour". This was the name of a stream in Elis.
Celemon f Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. It occurs briefly in 'Culhwch and Olwen' belonging to a lady at King Arthur's court, the daughter of Sir Kay.
Celeus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κελεός (Keleos), which is derived from Greek κελεύω (keleuō) which can mean "to command, to order" as well as "to urge (on), to drive on". In Greek mythology, Celeus was the king of Eleusis.
Celeustanor m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Keleustanor. In Greek mythology, this is the name of a son of Heracles, whom he had with Iphis, the daughter of king Thespius of Thespiae in Boeotia.
Celidonius m Judeo-Christian Legend
Probably a Latinized form of the Greek Χελιδόνιος (Chelidonios), which was derived from χελιδών (chelidon) "a swallow". In Christian tradition this name is sometimes ascribed to the unnamed "man born blind" whose sight Jesus miraculously heals (in the Gospel of John 9:1-12), and the form Celedonius belonged to an early saint, martyred c.300.
Cendroseta f Folklore
Provençal form of Cinderella.
Cenerentola f Folklore
Italian form of Cinderella, derived from Italian cenere meaning "cinder".
Cenicienta f Folklore
Spanish form of Cinderella.
Cephiso f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κηφισώ (Kephiso), which is the feminine form of Kephisos.... [more]
Cephisus m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Kephisos. This is the name of an ancient Greek river god.
Cerdo f Greek Mythology
Means "profit, gain" in Greek. In Greek mythology, Cerdo was the nymph-wife of King Phoroneus of Argos and mother of Apis and Niobe.
Cessair f Irish, Irish Mythology
Allegedly means "affliction, sorrow". According to Irish legend Cessair was a granddaughter of Noah who died in the great flood. The name also belonged to a Gaulish princess who married the Irish high king Úgaine Mór in the 5th or 6th century BC.
Cethlenn f Irish Mythology
Possibly means "crooked tooth". In Irish myth she was the wife of Balor of the Evil Eye, king of the Fomorians and by him the mother of Ethniu (or Eithne, Ethlenn).... [more]
Ceto f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κητώ (Kētō), which meant "sea-monster" (supposedly the source of the word κῆτος (kētos) "any sea-monster or huge fish; sometimes the whale, but often the tunny-fish")... [more]
Ceyx m Greek Mythology (Rare)
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology, Ceyx was the husband of Alcyone. After he was killed in a shipwreck, his wife threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers.
Chac m New World Mythology
The Mayan god of Agriculture, Fertility, and Rain. He is also associated with east and the colour yellow.
Chaeron m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chairon. This name was borne by Chaeron of Pellene, a wrestler and tyrant from Pellene who lived in the 4th century BC.
Chairon m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek χαίρω (chairo) meaning "to be glad, to rejoice".
Chak m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Nepali, Sinhalese, Tamil
MEANING - to shine, satiate, to resist... [more]
Chakas m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Tamil, Marathi
MEANING : Shining, make bright, cause to shine
Chakor m Hinduism
MEANING : Greek partridge these are fabled to subsist on moonbeams... [more]
Chakorak m Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi
MEANING : Greek partridge
Chakori f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Nepali, Sinhalese, Marathi, Gujarati
MEANING : female Greek Partridge ( fabled to subsist on moonbeams )... [more]
Chalciope f Greek Mythology
Derived from χᾰλκός (khalkos) meaning "copper" and οψ (ops) meaning "voice".
Chalcis f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Means "copper, bronze" in Greek. It is the name currently used in English to refer to a town on the Greek island of Euboea, called Χαλκίδα (Chalkida) in modern Greek, and the Ancient Greek name of the same town... [more]
Chalcodon m Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek masculine name meaning "like bronze".
Chalcomedusa f Greek Mythology
Mother of Laertes. Her name, chalcos ("copper") and medousa ("guardian" or "protectress"), identifies her as the protector of Bronze Age metal-working technology.
Chaldene f Astronomy, Greek Mythology
One of Jupiter's moons, named for a character in Greek mythology whose name is variously given as Chaldene, Caldene, Calchedonia, or Chalcea.
Champila f Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Kannada
MEANING - a river ... [more]
Chamyne f Greek Mythology
Epithet of Demeter 1 which is derived from Greek χαμα "earth".
Chandrat m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism
MEANING : it was the name of an ancient physician
Chang m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Punjabi
MEANING : Handsome, understanding, being judge of... [more]
Chang'e f Chinese Mythology
From Chinese 嫦娥 (Cháng'é) meaning "beautiful Chang", an altered form of the deity's original name 姮娥 (Héng'é) to avoid the taboo of sharing a homophonous name character with 2nd-century BC Emperor Wen of Han (personal name Liu Heng (劉恆))... [more]
Changqin m Far Eastern Mythology, Chinese Mythology
From a combination of the characters 长 (cháng, meaning “long”) and 琴 (qín, referring to the guqin or Chinese zither). This is the name of a mythological figure found in the Shanhaijing (山海经), or Classic of Mountains and Seas... [more]
Changxian m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 常(cháng, meaning “always” or “frequent”) and 先 (xiān, meaning “first”). Changxian was one of the prominent retainers serving the Yellow Emperor (Xuanyuan) along with Fenghou and Limu... [more]
Chaos m & f Greek Mythology (Latinized), English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "gaping void," ultimately from the Greek khaos "abyss, that which gapes wide open, is vast and empty." In Hesiod's 'Theogeny,' Chaos is the primeval emptiness of the Universe, who gave birth to Gaea (Mother Earth), Tartarus (embodiment of the underworld), Eros (god of love), Erebus (embodiment of silence), and Nyx (embodiment of night).
Chariclo f Greek Mythology
Means "graceful spinner" in Greek. It is the name of two nymphs in Greek mythology.
Charmidas m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Aeolic and Doric Greek form of Charmides, because it contains ίδας (idas), which is the Aeolic and Doric Greek form of the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides).... [more]
Charmos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from either the Greek noun χάρμα (charma) meaning "joy, delight" or the related Greek noun χάρμη (charme) meaning "joy of battle, eagerness for combat".
Charmus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Charmos. A known bearer of this name was the Athenian polemarch Charmus of Kolyttus (6th century BC).
Charvak m Sanskrit, Hindi, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Telugu, Bengali, Malayalam, Kannada, Marathi
MEANING : One who speaks nicely or sweetly, a philosopher
Charvangi f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Nepali
MEANING : beautiful-bodied, charming lady. It is joining of चारु + अङ्गी .Here चारु means beautiful, lovely + अङ्गी means bodied, limbs
Charybdis f Greek Mythology
The name of a sea monster believed to live under a small rock on one side of a narrow channel. Opposite her was Scylla, another sea monster, that lived inside a much larger rock... [more]
Ch'aska f Incan Mythology, Quechua
In Incan mythology, Ch'aska ("Venus") or Ch'aska Quyllur ("Venus star") was the goddess of dawn and twilight, the planet Venus, flowers, maidens, and sex. She protected virgin girls. This name is of a separate etmology, with the Quechua ch'aska referring to what they thought was the brightest star but was the planet Venus... [more]
Chaxiraxi f Spanish (Canarian), Guanche Mythology
Means "she who sustains the firmament" in the Guanche language (source: Dr. Ignacio Reyes García). This is the name of the mother goddess in Guanche mythology. After the conquest of the Canary Islands and their subsequent Christianization, Chaxiraxi became identified with the Virgin of Candelaria, an alleged appearance of the Virgin Mary on the island of Tenerife.
Chayuga f Spanish (Canarian, Archaic), Guanche Mythology
From Guanche *ta-jiwəg-ah, meaning "flowering". This was the name of a goddess venerated in Tenerife.
Chelidon f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow" (as in, the bird).... [more]
Chelone f Greek Mythology
Chelone was a nymph or a mortal woman who was changed into a tortoise by the gods. She was transformed by Hermes for refusing to attend the wedding of Hera and Zeus.... [more]
Chepi f & m Algonquin, New World Mythology
Many baby name sites and books list this name as meaning "fairy" in Algonquin but that is incorrect. It more accurately means "ghost", and it was another name for Hobomock, the manito ('spirit') of death-- a destructive, often evil being... [more]
Cherin m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
The name of a legendary king of the Britons in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae. It is likely related to Irish Ciarán.
Cherti m Egyptian Mythology
A later name for the Egyptian ferryman of the dead, Aken, and the one which is suspected to have influenced the development of the Greek ferryman of the dead, Charon.
Chevi f Sanskrit, Hindi, Hinduism, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu
MEANING : Name of a raagini (in music), female personification of music
Chhata f Sanskrit, Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi
Name: Chhata छटा ... [more]
Chhek m Sanskrit, Hindi, Telugu, Hinduism, Indian
MEANING : "clever", shrewd, domesticated, bee
Chheka f Sanskrit, Indian, Hinduism, Tamil, Marathi, Telugu, Hindi
MEANING : "clever", shrewd, domesticated
Chía f New World Mythology
Pre-Columbian goddess of the moon.... [more]
Chicomecōātl f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl chicome meaning "seven" and coatl "snake". This was the name of an Aztec goddess of food, drink, harvest, maize and famine.
Chicōmexōchitl f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl chicome meaning "seven" and xochitl "flower". This was an epithet of the Aztec mother goddess Tonantzin.
Chīmalmā f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "shield hand" in Nahuatl, derived in part from chīmalli "shield". In Aztec legend this was the name of the mother of the Toltec god Quetzalcoatl.
Chimera f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Derived from the Ancient Greek word Χίμαιρα meaning "she-goat". In Greek Mythology, this was the name of a legendary fire-breathing beast which consisted of three animals merged into one, usually depicted as a lion with a goat's head on its back and a tail capped with a snake's head, and is the enemy of the hero Bellerophon.
Chintan m Hinduism, Indian
Indian-Sankskrit... [more]
Chione f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Chion.... [more]
Chiron m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Derived from Greek kheir meaning "hand" (also "skilled with the hands", related to kheirourgos "surgeon"). In Greek mythology he was the eldest and wisest of the centaurs, who educated and trained many of the great heroes... [more]
Chiyou m Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
The name of a mythological tribal chieftain who famously opposed the Yellow Emperor. Various sources describe him as a horned humanoid with four eyes, six arms, and hoofed feet, with 81 brothers-in-arms... [more]
Chonghua m Chinese, Chinese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
From the characters 重 (chóng, meaning “double”, “layered”) and 华 (huá, meaning “flower”, “luxuriance”). This was the supposed personal name of Emperor Shun, one of the Five Emperors said to have ruled in the early days of Chinese civilization... [more]
Chors m Slavic Mythology
The moon god in Slavic Mythology.
Chosk m Sanskrit, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Hinduism, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Marathi, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujarati
MEANING - an Indus horse, a horse of particular & good breed... [more]
Chromion m Greek Mythology
Diminutive form of Chromios, as this name contains the Greek diminutive suffix -ιων (-ion). In Greek mythology, Chromion was an Achaean who was killed by Eurypylus during the Trojan War.
Chromios m Greek Mythology
Most likely derived from Greek χρῶμα (chroma) meaning "colour", which is a word that originally referred to the colour of one's skin (i.e. complexion). Another possibility for the meaning of this name is a derivation from the Greek noun χρόμη (chrome) meaning "neigh, neighing" (as in, the cry of a horse).
Chromius m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chromios. This is the name of several characters in Greek mythology, one of them being a son of king Priam.
Chronos m Greek Mythology
Means "time" in Greek. In Greek mythology the god Chronos was the personification of time.... [more]
Chrysaor m Greek Mythology
Meaning "he who has a golden sword" from Greek χρυσός, "golden" and ἄορ, "sword". In Greek mythology Chrysaor was the brother of Pegasus who sprung from the severed neck of Medusa.
Chryse f Greek Mythology
Means "golden."
Chrysippus m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chrysippos. In history, this name was most notably borne by Chrysippus of Soli, a Stoic philosopher from the 3rd century BC. In Greek mythology, this was the name of a divine hero with a very tragic story.
Chrysopeleia f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
In Greek mythology, Chrysopeleia was a hamadryad nymph.... [more]
Chrysopelia f Greek Mythology
The name of an Hamadryad nymph who married Arkas, the eponymous King of Arkadia. Her name is derived from the elements χρυσός (khrysos) meaning "gold, golden" and πελεία (peleia) meaning "dove", a common name element associated with female seers.
Chrysosandalaimopotichthonia f Greek Mythology
Epithet of Hecate meaning "(goddess) of the lower world wearing golden sandals and drinking blood", from Greek chrysos "gold", sandalon "sandal", haima "blood", poton "that which one drinks" and chthonios "in the earth".
Chrysothemis f & m Greek Mythology
Derived from the Greek noun χρυσός (chrysos) meaning "gold" combined with the Greek noun θέμις (themis) meaning "law of nature, divinely ordained justice, that which is laid down" (see Themis).... [more]
Chthonia f Greek Mythology
Means "of the earth, in the earth" in Greek (a derivative of the (mostly poetic) word khthon "land, earth, soil"). This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter.
Chthonophyle f Greek Mythology
Derived from χθών (khthon) meaning "ground, earth, soil" and φυλή (phulḗ) meaning "tribe".
Chumong m Korean Mythology
Variant transcription of Jumong.
Ciarnait f Irish Mythology
Feminine form of Ciarán.
Cigfa f Celtic Mythology, Welsh Mythology
Cigfa is a minor character in Welsh mythology. Her full name was Cigfa ferch Gwyn Glohoyw.
Cihuacōātl f Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Derived from Nahuatl cihuātl meaning "woman, lady" and coatl "snake". This was the name of an Aztec fertility goddess.
Cikap-kamuy m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of land and owls, often depicted as (to nobody's surprise) a great owl.
Cinaedion f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κιναιδιον (Kinaidion), which meant "(Eurasian) Wryneck", a type of small grey-brown woodpecker (traditionally associated with passionate and restless love as well as witchcraft, i.e., used by witches in a charm to recover unfaithful lovers)... [more]
Cinxia f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of conception. She functions within the belt (cingulum) that the bride wears to symbolize that her husband is "belted and bound" (cinctus vinctusque) to her. It was tied with the knot of Hercules, intended to be intricate and difficult to untie... [more]